capnwilliam

Where be the Cannon???

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So mates, if this be the Armory and the section about guns, why no topics about the REAL pirate guns: the ship's cannon, aye? :P

Jim

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well technically....once the cannon is on board the ship...its now called a gun....and vice versa.....but im bein picky.....

BRING OUT THE GUNS!!!! ;)

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We shot this Cannon last week end at Ojai.. Fun it is to wield such a powerful gun..

I'm just learning about them myself.

IMG_1937.jpg

Edited by oderlesseye

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well technically....once the cannon is on board the ship...its now called a gun....and vice versa.....but im bein picky.....

BRING OUT THE GUNS!!!! ;)

Point well taken. Madodgge. I was just trying to be certain that they realized that it WAS the big guns I was referring to.

Jim

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We shot this Cannon last week end at Ojai.. Fun it is to wield such a powerful gun..

I'm just learning about them myself.

IMG_1937.jpg

Beats muskets and pistols by a nautical mile, Odorless! ;)

I'm going to start posting some serious ship's gun stuff. My cannon crew is getting back in practice, and this will be a good thing for all of us. ;)

Jim

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spent 14 years corproling a full battery of 6 and 12 pounders....a cival war era...Bat G 2nd Ill Light Artillary.....even had a few originals the the actual Bat G used in conflicts...a cival war decendant of the Bat G.....

damn i miss shootin em...got to shoot em live a few times also.....whoooo hooo!!!

post more pics.please.....i'm lookin up a few night shots we took years ago.....

is it gittin hot in here??? :lol:

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One of the neatest cannon experiences I have had is the privelege of firing an original 7 inch Brooke rifled cannon at the Confederate Naval Museum in Columbus, Ga. It uses 5 pounds of powder per shot as a blank load. Normal live load was about 15 pounds, variable according to projectile weight. Quite an earth shaker !!!

>>>> Cascabel

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Now that takes me back. Awwww... Do my eyes deceive me or do I see #2 man and #3 man running away? God, I miss the worm. #2 is by far the best position on that gun. #1 looks like a vet, still standing but leaning back just enough =). Some say #4 has the most fun (lanyard) but I say NAY! tis the loading, worming, and dry sponge that was the most fun (and the most work out).

And for you dirty pirates, #2 gives a left arm work out (to balance you out, wink-wink).

Just out of curiosity, would that by chance be one of the Richmond Howitzers guns?

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Eye got to yank the lanyard on this shot and was naughwt "running away"

Eye was turning counterclock wise as I pulled on the Lanyard...

The Cannon is civil war era..wot type..I know naughwt...

Here is a better shot of it with Grey Dog ...

IMG_1892.jpg

Edited by oderlesseye

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The Cannon is civil war era..wot type..I know naughwt...

That is a full scale reproduction M-1841 six pounder cannon on a US Civil War Carriage. We fire 1/2 pound of Black Powder per blank charge. The organizer for the Ojai Pirate Fair contacted our Master Gunner (Who owns the gun) to get a relatively large cannon at the fair. It's way out of period (like 120 years) for GAOP. We are in the process of getting the barrel (all 1,000 pounds of it) on to a period naval carriage so it will look a lot better than the current presentation, but of course the barrel will always be out of period.

-Greydog

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Is that a cannon in your pants or are you just happy to see us!

sorry I just couldn't resist! :lol:

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Eye got to yank the lanyard on this shot and was naughwt "running away"

Eye was turning counterclock wise as I pulled on the Lanyard...

The Cannon is civil war era..wot type..I know naughwt...

Here is a better shot of it with Grey Dog ...

Yaaaar then you DID have fun =). 3 and 4 are switched from what I'm used to. Your spot would have been standing around doing nothing after the charge been primed. So I thought to myself, "Hey! He's scared of the bang". Hehehe glad to see that's not the case. The guy on the right corner of that shot (where you can only see his arse) would have been the lanyard man.

Those things are a blast, aren't they?!

Hey Graydog, was that a Yaaaaar! picture or were you searching for a breeze =)

Edited by Thequartermaster

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I knew we had some cannoneers on here after all! ;)

Wormer's my favorite position, when I'm not being gun captain. My crew's 1815 era, though. We don't understand all this CW "No. 2" stuff! ;)

Jim

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though i too loved to worm...dont know why just got into it...we also took great joy in ramming the round home....with a slighty wet...slightly sludgie dry sponge on the other end of the ram....and took bets on how filthy we could make the poor corporal with the resulting spray who's job it was to hold the thumb stall.....he would call for "RAM"...then duck his head...for he knew it was commin!!!!

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I've been on many a gun crew, and worked every gun position... I can't say I favour any one over the other...

Here's some images...

P7220367.jpg

1750s french field piece, with a very motley gun crew.

P7220361.jpg

Firing said piece. (this was a multi time period event, notice the ACW crew in the background)

P8160013a.jpg

Firing one of Master Hawkyns guns at a past Pennsic.

P8150004.jpg

More Pennsic guns.

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One of the neatest cannon experiences I have had is the privelege of firing an original 7 inch Brooke rifled cannon at the Confederate Naval Museum in Columbus, Ga. It uses 5 pounds of powder per shot as a blank load. Normal live load was about 15 pounds, variable according to projectile weight. Quite an earth shaker !!!

>>>> Cascabel

WOW! We normally fire a six pounder with about an 8 ounce blank load, but a couple of weeks ago we fired an 18 pounder with 2 pounds of powder. I was worming, and the concussion literally blew my hat off my head!

Five pounds? Love to try it! FIFTEEN pounds + projectile? Don't even want to think about it! ;)

Jim

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I've been on many a gun crew, and worked every gun position... I can't say I favour any one over the other...

Here's some images...

P7220367.jpg

1750s french field piece, with a very motley gun crew.

P7220361.jpg

Firing said piece. (this was a multi time period event, notice the ACW crew in the background)

P8160013a.jpg

Firing one of Master Hawkyns guns at a past Pennsic.

P8150004.jpg

More Pennsic guns.

Firing a medley of cannon from various eras all at once: my idea of heaven! ;)

Jim

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While not as big as some of the pieces here, we have a jolly good time firing ours at Pirate and Renaissance faires. No ball though :-(

cannons.jpg

Edited by Capt Thighbiter

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'Day, te ye Dorian.

Thanks for posting a couple of pics of my pieces. The red one is Voice, an early 17th century piece, the blue one is Cricket, a 15th century piece. I also have Morning Glory, a mortar, and Nightingale, a swivel on a wheeled carriage. Pics to come of them as I can.

Strange to see Voice here this mornin g, for as we speak, she sits in the yard having fresh paint put to her, in preparation for the Imperial Acadamy of Gunnery, an SCA event just north of Allentown, PA, this weekend.

http://www.eisental.eastkingdom.org/events/gunnery/

Pay not so much attention to the class list, that is the list of non gunnery topics. I am teaching cannon safety and matchlock drill, and others will teach on other subjects.

Hawkyns

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I knew we had some cannoneers on here after all! ;)

Wormer's my favorite position, when I'm not being gun captain. My crew's 1815 era, though. We don't understand all this CW "No. 2" stuff! ;)

Jim

Well, I'm sure every group is slightly different and some probably don't use the numbers. If memory serves me correctly, I'll go down the list (just for fun)

1. Looking down the barrel, stands on the right side of the gun at barrel's end.

Before Fire: Ramming the charge with ram end of the wet sponge.

After Fire: Wet sponge for sloppy awesomesauce. (extinguish embers and quick clean)

2. Looking down the barrel, stands on the left side of the gun at barrel's end.

Before Fire: Loading the charge (Ding Dong) after a hand delivery from the powder monkey. Yes powder monkey was indeed the correct term. To my knowledge, never given a number, but if I had to.. I would say #5 man who just stands by the ammo cart all day… boooooring (perfect job for the noobies).

After Fire: Worm (cleaning out the Ding Dong wrapper) and dry sponge to clean out the sloppy awesomesauce.

3. Looking down the barrel, stands on the left side of the gun's rear.

Before Fire: Priming wire. This is the guy with the long brass pin with a ring at the end. Slams this down the wire to puncture the charge and open up the ding dong (delicious).

After Fire: Vent pick to clean out any crap that could cause a fowling or misfire. Usually helps #4 insert and hold the primer. (Only until #4 has the lanyard snug, otherwise the primer wants to pop out while #4 walks back to firing postion).

4. Looking down the barrel, stands on the right side of the gun's rear

Before Fire: Hooks the lanyard to the primer. Yaaaaa, that's about it.

After Fire: Stands there until Before Fire: Lazy buggers!

5/Powder Monkey: Stands by the ammo crate and runs powder

Before Fire: RUN MONKEY RUN!

After Fire: RUN MONKEY RUN!

6/7/8: No reenactors needed but in Civil War they would prime the actual ammunition. Many rounds would have punch holes which had numbers on them. This is to open the round to allow fire in and ignite a fuse. The charge would then explode (say at 200 yards) instead of relying on a direct hit. Pretty nifty.

Gun Sergeant: At gun's rear but slap in the middle. These guys also generally make fun of us (in good sport) and act as a bridge between officers and peons (I mean privates/corporals). They also crack wise at the officers, bringing us peons great joy.

Before Fire: Aims and elevates the gun barrel.

After Fire: Looking pretty with those 3+ stripes. Also, making fun of us and cracking wise.

Tips:

When #4 and using the lanyard, place the handle between your knee and hip on your leg. Instead of yanking the lanyard, keep your feet in the same place but turn left. Sometimes we'll yank the lanyard but loosen the tension and sometimes the lanyard hook will bounce out of the primmer hoop. Embarrassing.

Everyone should use gloves at all time. Welder gloves are perfect, except for #4 where deerskin help with the delicate nature of the job.

Why so much Brass everywhere? It doesn't make sparks unlike steel or iron, hence a much safer experience. You don't want that priming wire setting off a charge, now would

you?

Perks of artillery.

When you get that sloppy powder/water mix on your clothes, it turns GREEN! Bringing character to your gear. Also, used primers pinned to your hat also give you more character.

Yaaaar I love to write long posts and I hope you mates like reading them =)

Everyone, feel free to message me or post with questions. A trip down memory lane =)

Edited by Thequartermaster

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Eye got to yank the lanyard on this shot and was naughwt "running away"

Eye was turning counterclock wise as I pulled on the Lanyard...

The Cannon is civil war era..wot type..I know naughwt...

Here is a better shot of it with Grey Dog ...

IMG_1892.jpg

That cannon was so SWEET!

Especially the aftermath choirs of car alarms sounding off from across the other side of the lake - fricken beautiful!

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IMG_0791.jpg

A two pound swivel gun aft on the Californian

IMG_0780.jpg

Theses were in the battle against the Surprise as well

IMG_0766.jpg

The HMS Suprise giving us a volley broadside

OMG that was a fun day!

Edited by oderlesseye

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Mates, I'm looking for a good picture or diagram of a Linstock. Between work, home and friends I would like to attempt to make one. Nothing fancy, but sturdy. I know that there are a few sites where I can buy one, but what's the fun in that?

Any help would be greatly appreciated.

Davey

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We made one with:

3/4" oak dowl

3/8" copper tubing ( the bendy kind)

3/4 to 3/8 reducing coupling, copper, the sweat fit type.

file a groove in the 3/8 end of the red coupling to fit the OD of the 3/8 tubing, so it lays 90 deg from the axis of the coupling. bend the tubing carefully into a J, dont kink it. Solder in place. Attached to the dowel with a few brass screws.

Viola! Linstock for about 10 bucks.

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I just want to add that i envy NO ONE on a ship gun =). That picture looks very uncomfortable especially after hour two of firing.

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