kass

Golden Age of Piracy Patterns

60 posts in this topic

Lovely, lovely. I believe you have sold yourself another pattern; I shall place my order this weekend.

Now.... how about breeches? <_<

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I can hardly wait for the Renaissance Cruise January 2007. To be standing on the flying bridge in full regalia, should make a striking sight, indeed. :) :(

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Jack, if you don't send me pictures, I'm gonna cry!!! :ph34r:

Jim,

Breeches will come. Still working out the bugs in the pattern.

Kass

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Could you just give us a hint at the titles of what

these are going to be???????

Thanks

Greg

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Hee hee hee hee hee hee! My numbering system is designed to keep you in the poor house, Greg! B):huh:B)

Seriously, when I plan a new line, I number all the potential patterns before I start working on anything. So they are in an order that really only becomes clear when you see them all. For example, RH703 is a 1720s Frock Coat, which comes in the lineup behind the 1680s and 1700s models.

707, 708, 709, and 711 are already available. They're women's patterns (the Bodiced Gown, Mantua, Hunting Outfit, and Stays, respectively).

I forget what 710 was... Oh yes. It's a Great Coat pattern. The Brandenburg is the early, Oriental-style overcoat. RH710 is the later style with the narrow waist and huge skirts to match the frock coats.

And 713 is the last but not least. It's an accessories pattern for men and women, incorporating all the little bits that are too small for their own pattern.

How's that?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Kass

I've e-mailed asking if you could please add the slops pattern to my order. Kill two birds with one stone as it were. B)

I'm getting stoked about this!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I absolutely can do that, Maria! Thanks for the order.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Now available:

Waistcoatswaistcoatscoversm.gif

Sailor's Jacketscommonmansjacketcoversm.gif

Breeches and Slopsslopscoversm.gif

All based on extant garments and information from the Admiralty Slop Contracts.

Soon to come... garments!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Personally, I can't see how one can justify $25 each for these patterns.

Yours, Mike

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

You hit the nail on the head, Maria. These patterns are top notch and incredibly accurate. It's a testament to Kass' painstaking research. :)

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

You don't have to buy em', but they are a bargain nonetheless.

GoF

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Cost wise, these patterns are a bargain as GOF and MJ and the others have said. I've been tailoring historical garments for over twenty years now and have tried all most every pattern out on the market for various time frames and Kass's are simply put, the best to work with... Not only that but she is the best to work with as well... she has a chat list where she is more than happy to answer questions regarding all her patterns and help the sewer along with their projects... don't find that with most other pattern makers... very rare indeed...

I've seen nightmare patterns available at twice the cost which I have just ended up tossing in the trash.

I can and have sewn garments from books such as Waugh's Cut of Men's Clothes... the 1690s coat seems as if it were made just for me... but others don't even come close to fitting my size, so I know the time needed to enlarge and fit such patterns. Kass has saved us the trouble there. I have also sewn from period garments by "taking patterns" from original pieces... It is tough work and time consuming as well... all this Kass has, once again done for us...

And she has had hands on experience with many originals from the time frames she makes patterns from... NOT many pattern makers can actually make that claim... if you really study period clothing... most patterns are just glorified costume interpretations... Kass's patterns will produce period correct, working clothing! NOT Costumes!

In the long run... $25 is a mere drop in the bucket and well worth the investment...

In my opinion... if you are going to make something, make it right from the start or in the long run you'll be paying three times the price because you will constantly be tweaking it over and over and over and over....

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Do you have some kind of suggestions/guidelines for modifying your patterns to fit sizes outside the range you include in the package? That's the one problem I always run into whenever considering buying patterns - the fact that patterns for my size are rarely available from anyone, and generally are NEVER available in historical garb.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

The only individual I know of on this forum who does "painstaking" research is Foxe (IMHO). There are several other notable exceptions, but I have to point out that items like the slops contracts were published on "The Pirate Brethren" forum months ago by D. Rickman. Let's give credit when it's due.

Given the wide variety of resources (Waugh, Maclellan, Web Gallery, internet searches, archaeological specimens, V&A, etc, etc), how is it one reaches the conclusion that slops weren't worn or "in fashion" from 1680 to 1730?!?

It only took me a few hours to find a 1720 picture of a Dutch seaman wearing the loose skirt like knee breeches (aka "slops"). Feel free to post the pic on your website GoF, but please give me credit.

As for period correct patterns, go to the source- the best is "The Costumer's Manifesto". I used patterns from several specimens in the V&A museum dating from the early 1700's for the basis of my coat.

Yours, Mike

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
As for period correct patterns, go to the source- the best is "The Costumer's Manifesto". I used patterns from several specimens in the V&A museum dating from the early 1700's for the basis of my coat.

Yours, Mike

Wow! Mike, other than the two patterns from the V&A in Waugh's book, I would love to see the ones you mention, would you please share the links to these patterns!!

Thanks,

Hector

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

In that regard you'll probably want to purchase Kass's pattern(s), the period "patterns" aren't much except for an experienced tailor.

GoF has some images on his page-

http://www.gentlemenoffortune.com/Justaucorps.htm

Some more interesting info here-

http://www.theweebsite.com/18cgarb/1700.html

Yours, Mike

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I tried in vain to find Picart Sailor image without luck. Since you found it in 20 minutes, could you post a link?

Greg aka GoF

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

GoF,

Sorry if you have mistaken my comments, your research is impressive.

Please check your e-mail at comment@gentlemenoffortune.com, I sent you a copy of the pic several days ago.

Yours, Mike

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
If your skill level is high enough to take a 6x8" drawing and turn it into a wearable coat, then you probably don't need Kass' or anyone elses pattern.

Yes but I do have over twenty years experience with constructing period correct reproductions of original garments...(gee I started tailoring in 1972) I have already made at least half of the garments in Waugh's already...(gee GOF...got mine for under $40. evil grin...and my Florence M. Montgomery at 40.00 even broader evil grin)

And Kass's pattern, are still worth the price since I no longer have to go through the extra time or effort of enlarging said 6 x 8" drawing, grading it to size and then still correcting the fit (when or if necessary)... since they are extremely well researched, including using original garments, they are the perfect addition to any LHistorian's collection...

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Ok.. I got my Waugh for $20... and Montgomery for $45.... Probably my two favorite books.

I made my short jacket from Waughs outlines combined with period pictures.

It was a bitch, and took forever but I am pretty proud of it. Some of my buttonholes are frankensteinish.... but its more sailor made than tailor made.

Nonetheless, I bought Kass short jacket pattern to make another and to see how her interpretation/research was compaired to mine.

Hats off to Mad Mike though, because I think he has been taking the road less traveled (that is making/modifying his own patterns) too.

Greg

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
But if there is a site on the net that provides more info on GAoP pirate clothes, I'll eat my tricorne.

Define site... does a yahoo mail list count? :huh:

If your skill level is high enough to take a 6x8" drawing and turn it into a wearable coat, then you probably don't need Kass' or anyone elses pattern.

That's exactly how I made my coat. But Waugh's book doesn't give enough details on finishing things imho. If I can ever scrounge up $25 I'll buy the coat pattern just to have it for a reference.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Ok.. I got my Waugh for $20... and Montgomery for $45.... Probably my two favorite books.

:lol: and Montgomery's is a major investment, not that I would part with mine... last I saw, one sold on ebay for just under $500.00 ....whew... :)

And Blackjohn, point well taken about Waugh's, Kass even tells you what kind of stitches were used... and wait until she gets back from her next trip to England.... wow! :lol:

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
I made my short jacket from Waughs outlines combined with period pictures.

It was a bitch, and took forever but I am pretty proud of it. Some of my buttonholes are frankensteinish.... but its more sailor made than tailor made.

Honestly Greg,

You did a terrific job on that jacket...

sewing tip... you can take it or leave it... buttonholes are one of those things that improve the more you do them.... well since no one has the time to do nothing but buttonholes... try doing a few on scrap first before you start on your garment... gets you into the swing of things so to speak....

just my two cents...

Hector

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I had read that about button holes... so I "practiced" a bunch. Probably 20 button holes on pocket flap etc and my sucess rate was about 40%.

The short jacket pales in comparison to a justaucorps for button holes (which you well know), so I need to get to the top of my button hole game before I take the plunge.

Greg

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!


Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.


Sign In Now