LadyBarbossa

Tea!

4 posts in this topic

Alright... I admit... I'm a big tea person! And as much as I fancy some of the coffee drinks, too, like cappecinos, mocha latte's, etc... I do enjoy a good tea, too.

Now, I bought my mom some of the special Downton Abbey teas, and I've had friends give me tea blends, too. So my curious question is.. has anyone come across any mention anywhere of blended teas during the 17th and 18th century? Like a green tea with cloves and cinnamon or black tea with mulling spices or white tea with strawberries and rose hips.

My other curiosity is how specialized tea was during that time and how much of it was worth to a pirate when they took a prize full of tea, spices, fabrics, and other trade items.

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Tea was a colonial delicacy, so it was precious when being looted. Tea and coffee had a high value.

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I always enjoy looking in to history of everyday items we now use and see. So I hope this can be a little helpful :)

Both tea and coffee were luxury delicasies during this era for the most part, but people drank them. At this time both were got from the East, coffee from regions like town of Mocha in Arabia since its culvivation in America was only starting, and tea from eastern Asia. So they would have been expensive and so valued, but if pirates had no one to sell them perhaps they would have trown tea and coffee alike overboard. I remember that possibly an Indian Ocean pirate pirate Condent in 1720 or so left behind tons of spices after dividing loot with his crew in Madagascar propably as he had no one who could have taken them or just because other parts of the loot were satisfying enough.

Or captured coffee and tea could be drank even while pirates preferred stronger drinks. I mean it would make sense to take use of the cargo. Of course certain equipment was needed, but some at least had what was needed for making tea. There was a teapot found from pirate Sam Bellamy's whipwreck Whydah, but it might have been more used by its former captain Lawrence Prince, who on the other hand was former privateer and sea rover too before becaming a slaver and a merchant.

teapot.jpg

Some books say how pirate Bart Roberts drank only tea. or tea with added rum in it, but I am not aware if this is actually true. At least his teetotaler reputation may be an exaggeration or later made up after assumptions based on his aversion towards drunkenness of his crew.

However for historical sense it seems likely that the drink (tea) was not awfully "edited" yet by Europeans or colonials. Looking wikipedia about English tea culture at least it seems that sugar was added and around 1720s or so milk, but not very much else. I think this wikipedia article is decent. https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Tea_in_the_United_Kingdom#History

On the other hand I remember that cocoa was drank with pepper and Vanilla around or a little before this time. Adding e.g. cinnamon to tea wouldn't have been much different.

Edited by Swashbuckler 1700

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It was worth more to sell the drink, 

 

 

LW

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