Littleneckhalfshell

Restocking a modern flintlock to look more period

9 posts in this topic

sometimes ideas just pop into my head and one of them just did......

I have two Traditions PA Pellet Flintlocks with nylon stocks, I use them for muzzle loader deer season here in NY.

My thought was to try to make them look more period by constructing a new wooden stock for one of them.

Back in the day (I constructed a Numrich Arms flintlock kit where the stock was roughed out and you had to do the finer details and it didn't turn out too bad, nothing professional or worth any awards but it looked good to me.

i have many woodworking tools available to me, I have aged cherry wood in larger sizes, plus access to some walnut.

Since the Traditions is NOT a long rifle, but more of a standard modern hunting rifle length, and a Octagon barrel, what

might be a good period weapon to try to make a semi period attempt at?

Also have a flintlock pistol that is Rev/war period and thought of maybe changing the wood on that too.

Anyway, been kind of quiet here on the Pub, so I thought I would throw this idea into the hopper and see what turns up

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

You used to be able to get pre-inletted stocks from Dixie Gun Works, and probably still can. They were available pre-shaped, with just the octagonal barrel channel cut, and you had to take care of the rest. Probably can also be found at other suppliers, like Track of the Wolf. Try googling pre- or semi- inletted muzzle loader stocks.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I was thinking of starting from scratch, as most of the roughed out stocks available seem to be of the 'revolutionary' period style.

I was looking to get something more in line with something from the late 17th century, say 1660-1690 ? if there is a style for that

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Blank stocks in cherry, maple, or walnut:

http://www.trackofthewolf.com/List/Item.aspx/889/1

You'd be most likely wanting the full-stock walnut, for a European pistol.

These folks buy their components from India, and assemble them in their shop in Canada:

http://www.loyalistarms.ca/pistolshandguns.html

Maybe they'd sell you some of the components you'll need - butt caps, ramrod pipes, etc.....

Edited by BCarp

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

As far as making a modern Traditions gun into a 17th century pattern, not much about these guns are even close to the time period at all. You can get close with an early 19th century Hawken type though. I have searched the image bases for 17th century specimens for my Wheelock project and have not found any that have full-length octagon barrels or carbine length barrels in full octagon, which is what the modern barrel length would be considered in the 17th century. A full or half-stock Hawken type is your best best for something close to a historical time period/accurate weapon.

Bo

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

since there is not much traffic going on at the Pub, I will further pursue this subject. My Traditions has two things going for it in my opinion, it is a Flintlock and it has a shorter (Carbine) barrel in full octagon. I know that I am not going to fool a firearms expert, but most of the 'public' doesn't know a percussion lock from a flintlock. I don't expect the gun to be used for 'strict' reenactment situations, but there are a lot of Pirate events out there that allow for a wider variation of 'styles'? :huh: Now since I don't have the gelt to buy a correct period piece, and since I do have some woodworking skills, I thought that it might be a worthy endeavor to 'simulate' a period gun with the lock and barrel of the traditions gun. I have searched and found the following two seem to be different enough looking and period to the end of the 17th Century (1690) to suit my intentions

Dutchlate17thcenturynavelcarbine.png

LongJaeger.png

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

First, I appreciate that you want to do a project with the woodworking skills, and I can only say for the work and effort you are likely better off spending the time on a new rifle.

I have a Traditions kentucky with a 2 piece stock that I built from a kit. it was $225 when I bought the kit and I bought it as an entry level way of participating in a Morgan's Riflemen group impression. I've gone back and forth over restocking it with a one piece stock in a nice chunk of walnut, just to make it more "correct looking". After considering the cost/effort to replace the stock, I then considered replacing the lock, turning the octogon barrel down on the forward end, and the other hardware necessary, i decided long term it was better, and more cost effective to just build a new rifle.

In the end, I accepted my traditions rifle for what it is, a non authentic, but accurate shooting, reliable flinter and I am spending my efforts elsewhere. it will be used as a loaner for those starting out with nothing.

I have also seen used examples that are much closer to what I envision in the $400-$500 range which is what you will have in it when you are done anyway (if not more).

mP

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

This is a picture of the gun I am looking at restocking, NO COST involved! just time and some wood I already have. Not sure if those responding have a correct idea of what I am talking about

ScreenShot2014-07-22at93155AM.png

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Yes. I have two CVA Mountain Stalkers in caplock, one wood and one plastic, so I know just what you have to work with. If this is something you just wanna do then go for it, but it will never be "period" to 1690 no matter what you do to it, just the way it is. It will be what you want it to be, an "old-time-looking" gun to use at events. Good luck with it and have fun, I am finishing an Early Va. rifle now.

Bo

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!


Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.


Sign In Now