William Brand

On this day in history...

484 posts in this topic

July 9 - 

On this day in 1722, the Boston News Letter published a list of those captured by Edward Low after he sank ships of the fleet, and abandoned the Rebecca. 

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July 14 - 

On this day in 1698, the Darien scheme began with five ships, bearing about 1,200 people, and departed Leith for the Isthmus of Panama.

And on this day in 1702, Christopher Codrington, governor-general of the English Leeward Islands, lead 1,200 militiamen and privateers in a descent upon the shared island of St. Kitts, expelling its French Settlers.  

Also on this day in 1714, the Battle of Aland occurred wherein the Russian fleet overpowered the larger Swedish fleet.

And on this day in 1769, the expedition led by Gaspar de Portola established a base in California and set out to find the Port of Monterey.

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July 16 - 

On this day in 1661, the first banknotes in Europe were issued by the Bank of Stockholm, altering the way that money is distributed in a very new way.

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July 17 - 

On this day in 1596, At 10:30AM,  Dutch explorer Willem Barents arrived at Novaya Zemlya, an archipelago in the Arctic Sea.

Also on this day in 1603, Sir Walter Raleigh was arrested by forces of King James.

And on this day in 1690, Adam Baldridge arrived at Island of St. Marie in Madagascar where he built a fort and began trading with pirates.

And also on this day in 1696, a proclamation for the arrest of Henry Every was issued by the Lords Justices.

And if that weren't enough, on this day in 1696, an Irish Proclamation was put forth promising a reward for the apprehension of a pirate named Henry Every.

And finally, on this day in 1726, Captain William Fly of Jamaica and the ship Elizabeth was hanged at Boston.  His career as a pirate lasted just one month.

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July 19 - 

On this day in 1545, the Tudor warship, Mary Rose, sunk in Portsmouth Harbor at Hampshire, England. 

Also on this day in 1702, Philemon Ewer, the English shipbuilder is born.  He is responsible for the rebuild of the first ship built in North America back in 1696.  He also built the HMS Salisbury, which served as the location for the famous experiments on scurvy in 1747, by James Lind.

And on this day in 1723, Charles Harris and 25 pirates were hanged in Newport, Rhode Island.  Joseph Libbey, who was abducted the previous year along with Philip Ashton, was among them.  All were all former members of Edward Low’s crew.

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August 1 -
 
On this day in 1700, Culliford was arrested, and taken to the Marshalsea prison. He was tried for piracy of the Great Mohammed in 1698 and his pardon was ruled invalid. He was saved from hanging, because he was needed in Samuel Burgess' trial. Following the trial, Culliford disappeared from record, and rumor has it that he next served on a naval ship after which he disappears from the records like another famous pirate Henry Every.
Also on this day in 1708, Woodes Rogers’ expedition to capture a Manila galleon departed from Britain.
And on this day in 1721, Bartholomew Roberts captured two large ships at Point Cestos, now River Cess in Liberia. One of these was the frigate Onslow, transporting soldiers bound for Cape Coast (Cabo Corso) Castle. A number of the soldiers wished to join the pirates and were eventually accepted, but as landlubbers were given only a quarter share. The Onslow was converted to become the fourth Royal Fortune.
And also on this day in 1722, George Shelvocke returned from his round-the-world, privateering adventure.

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September 18 - 

On this day in 1687, the Irish made a Declaration promising a pardon to pirates who surrender themselves to Sir Robert Holmes.

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September 26 -

On this day in 1580, Frances Drake completed circumnavigation of the world, sailing into Plymouth aboard the Golden Hind.

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June 12 -

On this day in 1653, the First Anglo-Dutch War took place at the Battle of the Gabbard/ Battle at North Foreland. The English fleet beat the Dutch.
 

And on this day in 1665, New Amsterdam legally became British and was renamed New York after English Duke of York and England installed a municipal government.
 

Also on this day in 1667, Michiel de Ruyter destroyed the English fleet.
 

And on this day in 1704 in Glocester the following was reported. "Yesterday Major Sewall passed by this place with the Larrimore Galley, and Shallop Trial, standing for Salem, and having little wind, set our men ashore on the Eastern Point, giving of them notice that William Jones, and Peter Roach, two of the Pirates had mistook their way, and were still left upon the Cape, with strict charge to search for them, which our Towns People performed very industriously. Being strangers and destitute of all Succours they surrendered themselves this Afternoon, and were sent to Salem Prison."
 

Also on this day in 1735, Bern was roused to publish her first decree, warning her people of the Oberland against the trip to Carolina. It is a document altogether different from the Zurich decrees, in that it attempted to use persuasion rather than force. The Amtleute were to explain to those desirous of seeking their fortunes in Carolina, that the printed accounts on the subject were misleading, that the sea-journey was a long one, the change of air, the strange food, the lack of fresh water, occasioned sickness and death among Swiss people, pirates on the sea sold them into slavery, and arriving in Carolina as paupers, they were obliged to sell them selves into servitude. Those who in spite of these warnings were determined to go, should not have been prohibited from doing so, nor would they sacrifice the government s good-will, except those who possessed means valued at over five hundred pounds, who should be compelled to give up their citizenship and land-right. Emigration was not to be prohibited, but made distasteful, and the country was to be guarded against loss, as when persons of the homeless class were put into the places of those citizens who had left the district.
 

And finally on this day in 1772, Marion du Fresne was killed at Tacoury's Cove, Bay of Islands, New Zealand, by local Māori.

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June 13 -

On this day in 1665, English forces beat the Dutch fleet at the Battle of Lowestoft, off Suffolk, England.

And on this day in 1774, Rhode Island became the first colony to prohibit the importation of slaves.

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June 15 -

On this day in 1643, Abel Tasman returned to Batavia after discovering Tasmania.

And on this day in 1741, Captain Bering left Petropavlovsk, sailing to America.

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June 16 - 

 

On this day in 1671, Russian cossack pirates Stenka Razin and his brother Frol Razin were captured at Kaganlyk, his last fortress, and carried to Moscow, where, after bring tortured, Stenka was quartered alive at Lobnoye Mesto.

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On 6/16/2019 at 0:54 PM, William Brand said:

June 16 - 

 

On this day in 1671, Russian cossack pirates Stenka Razin and his brother Frol Razin were captured at Kaganlyk, his last fortress, and carried to Moscow, where, after bring tortured, Stenka was quartered alive at Lobnoye Mesto.

 

Literally my two favorite historical subjects - Piracy and Cossacks!!!

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June 17 - 

 

On this day in 1579, Sir Francis Drake landed on the coast of California at Drakes Bay and named it "New Albion".

 

On this day in 1704, Major Sewall appeared at Boston with a strong guard and brought pirates and gold that he had seized, and gave His Excellency a full Account of his procedure in seizing them. The prisoners were committed to Goal for trial and the Gold was delivered to the Treasurer and committee appointed to receive the same. The service of Major Sewall and Company was very well accepted and rewarded by the Governour. 

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June 18 - 

 

On this day in 1629, a sea battle at Dungeness occurred wherein Piet Heyn beat the Dunkirkers, commerce raiders in the service of the Spanish Monarchy.

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June 19 - 

 

On this day in 1704, the trial against John Quelch for piracy, robbery, and murder opened in Boston. 

 

And the Boston Newsletter reported the following on this day in 1704.

 

"Storms of Wind, with which it Pleased Almighty God to Afflict the greatest Part of this our Kingdom on Friday and Saturday the Twenty-sixth and Twenty-seventh days of November last." The domestic news relates largely to the seizure of Quelch's band of prates. There are also reports of hostile movements of the French and Indians.

 

"Rhode-Island…On the 19. Instant arrived Moses Butterworth in a Sloop from Barbadoes, 22. days passage, came out in Company with the Blackmail man of War, going in pursuit of the Country Briganteen, sent out from Barbadoes, some time before on a Cruise, having 50. of the man of War's men on board her, who instead of Returning, turn'd Pirate, and took an English Ship bound from London to Antigua, robb'd her and let her go : The news being brought from Antigua to Barbadoes, they immediately sent the Blackwall after her."

 

And on this day in 1719, Captain Howell Davis (or Hywel) (or Davies) was ambushed and killed.  He was a Welsh pirate. His piratical career lasted just 11 months, from 11 July 1718 to 19 June 1719. His ships were the Cadogan, Buck, Saint James, and Rover. Davis captured 15 known English and French ships.

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June 20 - 

 

The preparations took some years; there were other (political) affairs who took attention. In December 1577 Drake was ready. With the support of the queen and high officials many rich investors had financed the ships, crews and provisions; the queen put 1.000 pounds in. The fleet (one large ship, Pelican, later re-named Golden Hind, and four smaller ones, c. 160 seamen and a dozen of what they then called “gentlemen adventurers”, in casu “angry, young men” who also had invested in the enterprise) set sail on December 13, 1577 to reach the Strait of Magellan June 20, 1578. There two ships had to be sunk and one captain, Th. Doughty, to be hanged (some say he was beheaded). One ship perished during the passage in the Strait, and a fourth one found it much better to turn around and sail home. That left Golden Hind finding her own lonely way.

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June 21 - 

 

On this day in 1720, Bartholomew Roberts arrived in Trepassey, Newfoundland.

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June 22 - 

 

On this day in 1679, the Duke of Monmouth defeated Scottish Covenanters at Bothwell Bridge.

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June 24 -

On this day in 1675, King Philip's War in North America began when Native Peoples attacked colonists at Swansea, Plymouth colony.

And on this day in 1669, the French warship 'Therese' sank off Heraklion after an accidental explosion of the powder magazine.

Also in 1683, Nicholas Van Hoorn died. Nicholas Van Hoorn was engaged with Laurens de Graaf and Michel de Grammont in the capture of Vera Cruz in 1683. The division of the spoil led to a duel between Hoorn and de Graaf, which was fought on the shores of the bay of San Sacrifield, 8–10 km from Vera Cruz. Van Hoorn was seriously wounded in his arm. After he had returned to his ship, the extreme heat, combined with the absence of surgical aid and his passion for drink, soon ended his life. He was buried at Isla Mujeres on June 24th.

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June 28 -

On this day in 1726, Atkinson brings Captain Fly and other pirates to Great Brewster were they are put under guard to await trial. Atkinson was outnumbered five to one when he sighted some fishing boats and called for their assistance, tricking Fly to go forward with a glass, leaving his weapons behind. See citation.

"The men who had not taken on with Fly, were, Atkinson, Capt. Fulker's mate, and two youths belonging to him ; the carpenter and gunner belonging to Capt. Green; six of Capt. Gale's men, and the aforesaid Benbrooke, who belonged to Capt. Harris, with three of the men out of the schooner. Atkinson, seeing the prisoners and forced men were five to one of the pirates, thought of delivering himself from the bondage he was in : and as by good luck several other fishing vessels hove in sight,right ahead of the snow, he called to Capt. Fly, and told him he spied several other vessels ahead, desiring he would come forward and bring his glass. Fly did so, and leaving his arms on the quarter deck, set on the windlass to see if he could make out what they were. Atkinson, who had concerted his measures with one Walker and the above mentioned Benbrooke, secured the arms on the quarter deck, and gave them a signal to seize Fly; which they did, with very little trouble, and afterwards made themselves masters of the other three pirates and the snow, the rest of the prisoners, not knowing any thing of, or what the design might be, remaining altogether inactive, and brought the snow and pirates to Great Brewster, where a guard was put on board, June 28, 1726."

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June 30 - 

 

On this date in 1704, John Quelch and his crew were hanged on a Boston wharf for piracy. One of his crew, Miller, had been a member of Every's crew when they captured the Gang-i-Sawai.  

 

Also on this same day, Thomas Green, commander of the English merchantman Worcester, was arrested for piracy in the Indian Ocean. Although there was no solid evidence for the charges, Scotland convicted and executed him.

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July  1-3 

 

In 1702 it was reported in a newspaper 'Post-Boy' that between July 1st & 3rd Captain Ward, formerly a master under Captain Kidd, was brought in aboard the frigate, Greyhound to be committed as a prisoner to the Marshalsea.  It was said that he had purchased a considerable estate in Carolina, 'thinking to have settled there'.

 

July 2 - 

 

On this day in 1701, William Penn assured the BOT (Board of Trade), "We are all quiet, in health, and the country improves, not by piracy or forbidden trade, but honest labour and sobriety."  He remarked, "There is much to do to improve the morals of the people, and the capacity of these parts of the world to trade."  However, there was no simple solution like an imposing Royal Navy presence, more stringent laws, or other threats of coercion.  The answer was not to restrict liberties but to respond to the colonial concerns that had driven them in the pirate market.  Pen  concluded that some sort of formalization of the empire through coordinated activity was necessary.  Piracy would end only when when the colonies and the crown shared mutual economic interests.  He insisted, "It is trade must make America valuable to England, and if the industry of the inhabitants be not encouraged and well conducted, the Colonys must either sincke or become a great charge to the Crown to support them.  I take the boldness to affirm, here lies the clinch of the business."  From 'Pirate Nests and the Rise of the British Empire, 1570-1740"

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July 3 - 

 

On this day in 1721, William Kennedy was convicted of piracy and sentenced to hang.

 

And on this day in 1724, forced men took back their vessel and took William Fly and others prisoner. Fly and two other pirates would later hang in Boston, Massachusetts.

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July 4 - 

 

On this day in 1724, Francis Spriggs and the Delight captured a sloop near Saint Kitts. During that capture, the crew were tortured by Spriggs and his crew hoisted prisoners as high as the main or top sails and dropped them against the deck.

 

On this day in 1726, Captain Fly and other pirates captured by Walker and Benbrooke, were brought to their trial before the Honourable William Dumnier, Esq. Lieutenant Governor and commander in chief of the province of Massachusetts Bay, President of the Special Court of Admiralty, at the court-house of Boston, assisted by 18 gentlemen of the council; before whom they were found guilty of murder and piracy condemned to be executed, and accordingly were executed the 12th of July. Fly was ordered to be hanged in chains at the entrance of the harbour of Boston. Thus ended the short reign of an obdurate wretch, who only wanted skill and power to be as infamous as any who scoured the seas. The names of the three pirates, executed with him, w T ere, Samuel Cole, George Condick, and Henry Greenvil. 

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