William Brand

On this day in history...

457 posts in this topic

February 4 -



A deposition given by Henry Bolton on this day in 1700 about his interactions with William Kidd.



Being required by the Right hono'ble the Commission'rs for Executing the office of High Admiral of England, Ireland etc. to informe their Lord'ps of the place of my nativity, manner of Living for some time in the West Indies, and particularly of my meeting and Transactions with Capt. Kidd, I presume to make the following Answer, being the best and fullest I can make at present having neither my Books or papers in this Kingdome.



That I was born in Worcestershire about the yeare 1672 and in the year 1697 was Deputed by the Commissioners of his Maj'ties Customes for the Leeward Islands to be Collector for the Island of Antigua.



That in the year 1698 following I quitted that Imployment and followed Merchandizing about the said Leeward Islands.



That in February 1698/9 I sailed from Antigua in the Sloop St. Antonie, Samuel Wood Master, on a Trading Voyage amongst the Dutch and Spaniards. The Markett at Curacoa (a Dutch Island) not answering my Ends I went to Rio De la Hacha, and there sold my Cargoe, and Loaded my Sloope with Stock Fish [and] Wood on Freight for Curacoa aforesaid, which I there Landed and departed for the Island of Porto Rico with intention to Trade with the Inhabitants of that Island, having a Cargo on Board for that purpose.



That in that Voyage in the Moneth of Aprill 1699 being becalmed to the N.N.E. of the Island Mona the Men belonging to the Sloop discovered a Sail E. and B.S. from Mona which the Pilote of the Sloope supposed to be a Guarda Costa, a small vessell fitted out by the Spanish Governors to clear the Coast of Foreign Traders. A few houres after Wee discovered a Cannoa, which drawing near the Sloope, Wee hailed the said Cannoa. They answered from Whitehall. Wee demanded who Commanded their Shipp. They Replyed Capt. Kidd. Then he that stired the Cannoa was desired to come on Board. After he came he told me his name was John Ware, and that he was Master of Capt. Kidd's Ship, requesting that I would goe on Board in the Cannoa to see Capt. Kidd which accordingly I did. When I came there Captain Kidd askt me to sell him my Sloope in regard his Ship was disabled and could not well proceed the voyage he intended for New Yorke, and finding me unwilling he then askt if I could not procure him a Vessell. I answered possibly I might at Curacao, upon which he desired me to use my Endeavors there to get him a Sloope, and procure him some Buyers or Chapmen for his Calicos and Muslings, And that he would consider me for my paynes.



That thereupon I departed from Capt. Kidd and went for Curacao where I applyed my selfe to Mr John Stonehouse and Mr Walter Gribble (Acquaintance of Captain Kidd) who promised to send A Sloope to him. I also Endeavored to procure him some Buyers for the Muslings and Callicos.



That after doing my Errand and business at Curacao I ordered the Master of the Sloope to shape his Course for the West End of Porto Rico, But the Wind proving Northerly Wee fell in with the East end of Savona and plyed to Winward for Mona in order to meet Captain Kidd, which I there did according to Appointm't and with him a Dutch Sloope, Jean Vander Bist Master, and a French Turtler, the Master's name I have forgot; Captain Kidd waited at Mona for the Curacao vessells But the Wind being about No. and from thence to NNE they could not possibly Fetch Mona, So Captain Kidd's patience being tyred gott his ship under Saile and intended to Weather point Esperdo, the Eastermost part of Hispaniola, but the Deficiencies of his Ship being so great he bore away for the West end of Savona, and there Anchored. a Day or two afterwards came into Our Company the Brigandin Mary Gold, George Lorriston Master, and the Elenora, John Duncan Master. Then Cap't Kidd weighed Anchor with the sloop Spey, John Vander Bist Master, and Brigandine Mary Gold, sailed for the River Higuey in the Island Hispaniola where Arriving he moored his ship across the River to the Stumps of Trees or Rocks on shoar.



That there Capt. Kidd disposed of wine, part of his Cargoe, to severall that came on Board to him And that at the same time I sold him the Sloope St. Antonio.



That Capt. Kidd tooke severall Goods out of his ship, and put them on Board the Sloope I sould him and left his owne ship in the River Higuey and desired me to doe him all the service I could in selling and disposeing of the Goods left on Board of the said ship for Account of the Owners of the Adventure Galley.



That Captain Kidd told me that my Lord Bellomont and my Lord of Orford and himselfe were some of the Adventure Galleys owners and to the best of my Remembrance Sir John Somers.



That Capt. Kidd shewed me a Commission under the Great Seale signed at the Topp William Rex and another Commission signed by the Lords of the Admiralty, the purport of neither of which I can remember, onely Capt. Kidd sayd his Commissions impowred him to take pirates and the subjects of the French King.



That Capt. Kidd at his going to New Yorke promised to return himselfe or send some other persons in two Moneths time to bring Necessaryes for refitting his said ship the Adventure Prize and also a Condemnation for the said ship and Goods and to indempnifye all persons that should purchase any of the said Goods, alledging that the said ship was a lawfull prize being taken with a French passe which Captain Kidd shewed me, and actually in the time of War with France.



That after the Departure of Capt. Kidd the Seamen shiped by him in the said ship did plunder and convert to their owne uses the best and most choicest of the goods of the said ships Cargoe, which did not come to my Knowledge till they had been near Five Weeks on board the said ship, and indeed it was out of my power to prevent them had I discovered it sooner being only myselfe and Negro Boy, And they were Eighteen in numbers.



That the said Seamen belonging to the said ship as afores'd when they found I was not ignorant of their villanies openly declared they would not stay longer on board the said ship, but being terrified with the thoughts of Capt Kidds returning, they Joyned all (saving the Boatswaine) and came on the Quarter Deck and said I might remain in the ship and be damned for they would stay no longer. The Man that thus affronted me I shoved on the main Deck and ordered the rest to go on the Main Deck likewise and told them they had engaged themselves to Capt. Kidd to stay on board the ship as long as I should be there, And that I was resolved to stay till the two Months in which Capt. Kidd promised to return were expired unless some Extraordinary Accident intervened: I also charged them with stealing out of the Ships Hould severall Bales of Goods And that if they went from the Ship before Capt. Kidd's Arrivall I was oblidged as his Friend and in my owne Justification to write to all Governm'ts in those parts to have them secured; this calmed them for two or three dayes.



That the said Seamen did again Joyne and draw up a Paper directed to me setting forth their Resolution of leaving the Ship and signed with their names within a Circle commonly called a Round Robin, so gott on board A Sloope and went for the Island Curacao leaving the Ship to me and three more.



That after the departure of the said Seamen I stayd about a Week in the ship and would have stayed longer had not a Friend of myne sent a Sloope Express from Curacao to informe me the Spaniards of the Citty of St. Domingo were arming out a Brigandine to come and take us, which induced me to leave the said ship Adventure Prize in the said River Higuey and went to the Island Curacao in order to protest ag't the Seamen as aforesaid and to get what satisfaction the Law would allow, For at that time they had most of them three or Four hundred pounds a Man. But the said Seamen had gained their Ends so farr in the Governm't that the Governor would not admitt me to stay in Curacao tho' at the same time John Ware Master of Capt. Kidd's ship and the said seamen were there openly protected; I do not charge this on the Govern'r[13] (who is since dead) For I should be very sorry to disturbe the Ashes of so good a Gentleman as I believe he was, but on some of his Councill that did not desire I should face them.



That I have not received of the produce of the Goods Capt. Kidd left upwards of three hundred and Eighty peices of Eight, all the rest is in Debts outstanding which is much less than my Charges.



This is the full that presents to my Memory in Answer to their Lord'ps Demands February 4th, 1700.


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February 5 -



On this day in 1721, John Clipperton, sailing aboard his ship the 'Success', met up with George Shelvoke and forty surviving members of his crew at Coiba Island. With about 120 men between them, they joined forces.



Also on this day in 1722, the HMS Swallow, commanded by Captain Chaloner Ogle, came upon the three pirate ships, the Royal Fortune, the Ranger and the Little Ranger careening at Cape Lopez. The Swallow veered away to avoid a shoal, making the pirates think that she was a fleeing merchant ship. The Ranger, commanded by James Skyrme, departed in pursuit. Once out of earshot of the other pirates, the Swallow opened her gun ports and opened fire. Ten pirates were killed and Skyrme had his leg taken off by a cannonball, but refused to leave the deck. Eventually, the Ranger was forced to strike her colors and the surviving crew were captured.



Roger Ball. one of Roberts’ men in the ship Royal Fortune, upon being captured by HMS Swallow , tried to blow up the ship with Morris and Main. Being damp the keg had detonated with only enough force to smash a hole in the ship’s side through which he was thrown. Ball was picked up by the Swallow’s boat and resisted all attempts to dress his wounds, and although in terrible pain, he refused to be touched. "Why," he said, "John Morris fired a pistol into the powder, and if he had not done it, I would." Ball then became delirious during the night. He raved at the top of his voice about Roberts’ bravery and cunning. He was whipped the next morning on the forecastle for his insolences. He wrenched at the grating and was lashed more violently for his resistance. He remained through the day lay "in a private corner, with a look as sullen as winter", eating nothing, silent, brooding in the darkness. Eventually he lapsed into a coma and was gone.



February 6 -



On this day in 1802, Congress empowered President Jefferson to arm United States ships in order to protect themselves against Tripolitan pirates.



And on this day in 1832, a U.S. ship destroyed a Sumatran village in retaliation for piracy.


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February 10 -



Jan Abels was one of the first leaders of the Seabeggars in 1568. He was active with three vessels, manned by 40 people, in the Ems River. On this day in 1569, with a small boat and a crew of 25, Abels took a ship from Delfzijl, Friesland, laden with cheese and goods. He left the goods belonging to Hamburg merchants alone and sold the cheese belonging to the Spanish. He went on to seize a larger vessel and used her for further piracies, and continued to seize merchantmen from Amsterdam selecting the goods belonging to Spanish Netherlanders to sell.



Thomas Armstrong, one of Roberts' men, said to have been forced into piracy after deserting HMS Swallow at Cape Three Points, West-Africa in April of 1721. When Roberts on the morning of the 10th of February 1722 was surprised by a ship making slow headway against a offshore wind, it was Armstrong who rushed to tell him he recognized his old ship and knew her well. Armstrong told the pirate chief she "sailed best upon a wind and therefore, if they designed to leave her, they should go before it", which meant that the naval vessel was at her best when going into the wind, but sluggish when her sails were filled from behind. There were too few sober pirates to fight the powerful Swallow, Roberts pondered, that is why he would let the man-of-war come deep into the bay against the wind and then, at the last moment, his Royal Fortune would sail directly past her. However, writes Defoe: "coming close to the Man of War, they received her fire, and hoisted his black flag, and returned it, shooting away from her, with all the sail he could pack; and had he took Armstrong's advice, to have gone before the wind, he had probably escaped. But keeping his tacks down, either by the wind shifting, or ill steerage, or both, he was taken a-back with his sails; and the Swallow came a second time very nigh to him".



Robert's Royal Fortune was doomed and so was her crew. With Roberts' death the men surrendered. Armstrong was taken to HMS Weymouth to be executed in accordance with naval regulations. "There was nobody to press him to an acknowledgement of the crime he died for, nor of sorrowing in particular for it, which would have been exemplary." So after long hours of lamenting and bewailing his sins in general faced a noose dangling over a yard arm, secured to a capstan where some navymen waited for the order to wind up the rope. Desired the spectators to join in with him singing 2 or 3 last verses of psalm 140, which the sailors willingly did. The firing of a gun disturbed this peaceful moment and "the Deserter then was tric'd up by the Neck at the fore Yard Arm".



After a successful career as a pirate off the Iberian Peninsula, Captain Gow decided to return to the Orkney Islands. He was running low on supplies, and the authorities were on his trail. Arriving in early 1725, he adopted the name Mr. Smith for himself, and renamed his vessel the George, and passed as a wealthy trader, even courting a Miss Gordon. He was eventually recognized by a merchant passing through the islands, and his true identity was revealed. According to other accounts, some of his prisoners escaped there and notified the authorities. Rather than surrender, Gow and his men successfully raided the Hall of Clestrain on February 10, 1725, but when they attempted to attack another remote mansion, they ran aground on the Calf of Eday, where they were captured.


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February 11 -



Captain Croc, aka Krok, was one of the pirates known as a Seabeggar. He's remembered for cutting off the nose and ears of a priest before murdering him cruelly. The prince of Orange had him arrested and beheaded on this day in 1573.



William Funell was Dampier’s steward and was promoted to the position of midshipsman aboard the 200-ton St. George in 1703 (others had it Funell was sailing master). Funell was involved in a privateering expedition during the War of Succession, but attacking French vessels was a delicate question at the time. St. George was joined by Cinque Ports, and this was the voyage where Alexander Selkirk decided to stay behind at Juan Fernández Island. Funell helped attack a well-armed 400-ton French vessel, “fought broadside and broadside for more than six hours”, but St. George took heavy casualties, with nine men killed and many badly wounded. Funell supported a mutiny led by Edward Morgan and set off in a prize brigantine on this day in 1705. “If I spoke a word they would dash my brains out,” said Dampier. Funell arrived in patria eighteen months earlier (August 1706) than Dampier did, after having been jailed in Ambon (in the Dutch Moluccas) for four months. Funell was thought to be clever in imitating Dampier’s successes with his own journals and chose to write his own 'A Voyage Round the World', published by Knapton, London, in 1707, which book was denounced by Dampier as a “chimerical relation”. Most of Funell's charges in his writings against Dampier were unproven and fueled in part by malice and self-preservation.




February 12 -


Duchesne was a filibuster from France from 1681 through 1689. He was in command of a ship that sailed from Saint Domingue to sack Tampico in the Gulf of Mexico in 1683. Duschesne was also in the fleet of Joseph Bannister in 1684. On this day in 1685, he served in command of Bannister’s 36-gun Golden Fleece, because Bannister was not supposed to sail under French colors. In September 1685 he was able to escape the Spanish flotilla that had hunted down Bréha and nearly ended De Graaf’s pirate career.


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February 25 -

On this day in 1687, the Irish Order promises a reward and pardon for the discovery and apprehension of pirates.

February 26 -

While not a pirate, Sir Richard Haddock and interesting man of the sea. He was grandson of Captain Richard Haddock, who died April 20, 1660, and son of Mr. Haddock, who resided at Lee, where he was buried. The admiral erected a monument for the former : the latter has a grave-stone, with brass plates, oh which are engraved representations of himself and his three wives, ten sons ; and under the last wife eleven daughters. Thus numerous were the brothers and sisters of Sir Richard Haddock, who, being an able and gallant officer, and reaching the advanced age of 85 years, obtained very considerable posts of trust and profit. He was knighted before 1678, at which time he was returned a member of parliament for Aldborough, in Suffolk ; and in l685 he represented Shoreham, in Sussex. Sir Richard was appointed comptroller of the navy, one of the commissioners for victualling, and an admiral. He died February 26, 1713, and was buried with his ancestors, in the family vault at Lee. He was father of admiral Nicliolas Haddock.

Also on this day in 1717, Frederick William I of Prussia-Brandenburg and Frederick IV of Denmark signed an alliance which cemented the fate of thousands over the next 200 years.

Brandenburg-Prussia, as with most of Western Europe, had been embroiled in the war of Spanish Succession. Now that the conflict had ended, the German state turned east, to find in horror Sweden remained a large, looming threat. Western Pomerania was a most valuable strip of reality the Prussians couldn’t afford Sweden to have. Though they also had a formidable army on par with the Danish, the Danes had lost the Great Northern War…in a matter of months. A Swedish Invasion of Prussia, under any circumstance would be a violent and bloody affair. The Delta of The Oder also had fertile soils which would boost Prussian productivity.

Denmark wasn’t too happy with Sweden’s ego either. At least they had left the war status quo antebellum and not lost too many men to Sweden’s efficient military.

Both countries yearned for a time to strike Sweden in the gut. King in Prussia and Electorate of Brandenburg Frederick William I decided that it would be best if the two countries allied with one another in order to combat Sweden when she came.

And on this day in 1718, numerous pirates surrendered to Pearse at Nassau. Pearse received them throughout the next two days as a steady stream of boats arrived ashore. The first boatloads included Hornigold, Williams. Burgess, Lesley, and Nichols, as well as Bellmay's old quartermaster, Richard Noland and Hornigolds guartermaster, John Martin. The list grew to some 209 pirates seeking pardon, including Thomas Terrill, John Cockram, Daniel Sillwell, Leigh Ashworth, Samuel Moody and Charles Vane.

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February 27 -

On this day in 1698, the East Company received several letters describing the harsh policies of pirates that encountered resistance. Merchant Captains that did not immediately surrender all goods were often tortured to the last farthing for resisting.

And on this day in 1703, the privateer ship Charles took one of nine Portuguese ships during a month of captures.

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Februrary 28 -



Rayner, Captain. Although there is no evidence that Rayner ever sailed the Carolina coast, he did sail with Captain Kidd. In a letter dated "Philadelphia, February 28, 1701", William Penn wrote to the Lords of Trade in England, mentioning that several of Kidd's men had settled as planters in Carolina with Rayner as their captain.


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February 29 -

On this day in 1720, Edward England, aka Jasper Seagar, or Edw. Seegar, with no less than 250 men aboard, “attempted a Dutch ship near Cape Town. Came up with the Black Flag flying.” Royal James “was not beaten off until his foremast was within one foot of the Dutchmen’s ensign staff, when her chase guns raked him and made him withdraw.”

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March 1 -



While not pirate related, this little bit of history certainly demonstrates the fears and superstitions of the period, because on this day in 1692 the notorious Salem Witch hunts began.



Also on this day in 1796, the VOC (Dutch East India Company) was nationalized by the new Batavian Republic. Its charter was renewed several times, but allowed to expire on 31 December 1799.


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Have you come up with a calendar yet for each day of the year? I'd happily buy such a novelty!

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March 15 -



On this day in 1493, Christopher Columbus returned to Spain after his 1st New World voyage.


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June 6 -
 
On this day in 1719, Bartholomew Roberts turned to piracy after Howel Davis captured the slaver he worked aboard.
 
And on this day in 1995, the idea behind International Talk Like a Pirate Day was born. International Talk Like a Pirate Day (ITLAPD, September 19) is a parodic holiday created by John Baur (Ol' Chumbucket) and Mark Summers (Cap'n Slappy), of Albany, Oregon, U.S., who proclaimed September 19 each year as the day when everyone in the world should talk like a pirate. For example, an observer of this holiday would greet friends not with "Hello," but with "Ahoy, matey!" The holiday, and its observance, springs from a romanticized view of the Golden Age of Piracy. It has become a holiday for members of the Church of the Flying Spaghetti Monster. According to Summers, the day is the only holiday to come into being as a result of a sports injury. He has stated that during a racquetball game between Summers and Baur, one of them reacted to the pain with an outburst of "Aaarrr!", and the idea was born. That game took place on June 6, 1995, but out of respect for the observance of D-Day, they chose Summers' ex-wife's birthday, as it would be easy for him to remember.

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June 7 - 

On this day in 1692, a massive earthquake devastated the infamous town of Port Royal in Jamaica, killing thousands. The strong tremors, soil liquefaction and a tsunami brought on by the earthquake combined to destroy the entire town and part of Port Royal slid into the sea. More than 2,000 people died.

On this same day in 1692,  "Red Legs" Greaves, a Scottish buccaneer active in the Caribbean and the West Indies during the 1670s, escaped from Port Royal prison during the earthquake which destroyed Port Royal. 

Also on this day in 1740, Alexander Spotswood died of fever at Annapolis, Maryland.

And on this day in 1823, the U. S. schooners of war Greyhound and Beagle left Thompson's Island, under the command of Lieuts. Kearney and Newton, and cruised within the Keys, on the south side of Cuba, as far as Cape Cruz, touching at all the intermediate ports on the island, to intercept pirates. 

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June 8 - 

On this day in 1663, English & Portugese fleets beat the Spanish at the Battle at Amegical.

And on this day in 1690, Siddi general Yadi Sakat, razed the Mazagon Fort in Mumbai.

Also on this day in 1694, English troops landed Brest and attacked, killing 300. 

 

 

June 9 - 

On this day in 1534, Jacques Cartier became the first European to sail into the mouth the of St Lawrence River.

And on this day in 1616, Sir Henry Mainwaring received a pardon for his acts of piracy. He later wrote a treatise on piracy.

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June 10 - 

On this day in 1610, Dutch settlers arrived (from NJ), to colonize Manhattan Island.

Captain Charles Harris joined the notorious pirate Edward Low and he captained the sloop Ranger.  On this day in 1723, they suffered a resounding defeat in a battle with HMS Greyhound, a heavily armed man of war.  The Greyhound had been dispatched under the command of Peter Solgard to hunt down Low and his fleet. Low fled in the Fancy with a skeleton crew and £150,000 in gold on board and headed back to the Azores, leaving Harris and the Ranger behind.  Charles and his crew were captured and hung in Newport.

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June 11 - 

On this day in 1578, England granted Sir Humphrey Gilbert a patent to explore and colonize North America.

And on this day in 1664, Sir Thomas Modyford arrived in Jamaica to assume governorship.

Also on this day in 1594, Philip II recognized the rights and privileges of the local nobles and chieftains in the Philippines, which paved the way to the creation of the Principalía (i.e., elite ruling class of native nobility in Spanish Philippines).

And on this day in 1676, the Battle at Öland took place.  Danish and Dutch fleets under CM Tromp beat Swedish forces.

And finally, on this day in 1725, John Gow was hanged.  According to the Newgate Calendar, John Gow was slow to die. To relieve his pain, some of his friends pulled at his legs, but this just broke the rope, causing him to tumble to the ground, from where he was gathered up and hanged again.  After his death, his body (along with those of his crew) was left in the River Thames. The bodies were then tarred and suspended on the riverbank, as a warning to other would-be pirates.

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June 12 - 

On this day in 1653, the First Anglo-Dutch War took place at the Battle of the Gabbard/ Battle at North Foreland.  The English fleet beat the Dutch.

And on this day in 1665, New Amsterdam legally became British and was renamed New York after English Duke of York and England installed a municipal government.

Also on this day in 1667, Michiel de Ruyter destroyed the English fleet.

And on this day in 1704 in Glocester the following was reported.  "Yesterday Major Sewall passed by this place with the Larrimore Galley, and Shallop Trial, standing for Salem, and having little wind, set our men ashore on the Eastern Point, giving of them notice that William Jones, and Peter Roach, two of the Pirates had mistook their way, and were still left upon the Cape, with strict charge to search for them, which our Towns People performed very industriously. Being strangers and destitute of all Succours they surrendered themselves this Afternoon, and were sent to Salem Prison."

Also on this day in 1735, Bern was roused to publish her first decree, warning her people of the Oberland against the trip to Carolina. It is a document altogether different from the Zurich decrees, in that it attempted to use persuasion rather than force. The Amtleute were to explain to those desirous of seeking their fortunes in Carolina, that the printed accounts on the subject were misleading, that the sea-journey was a long one, the change of air, the strange food, the lack of fresh water, occasioned sickness and death among Swiss people, pirates on the sea sold them into slavery, and arriving in Carolina as paupers, they were obliged to sell them selves into servitude. Those who in spite of these warnings were determined to go, should not have been prohibited from doing so, nor would they sacrifice the government s good-will, except those who possessed means valued at over five hundred pounds, who should be compelled to give up their citizenship and land-right. Emigration was not to be prohibited, but made distasteful, and the country was to be guarded against loss, as when persons of the homeless class were put into the places of those citizens who had left the district. 

And finally on this day in 1772, Marion du Fresne was killed at Tacoury's Cove, Bay of Islands, New Zealand, by local Māori.

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June 13 - 

On this day in 1665, English forces beat the Dutch fleet at the Battle of Lowestoft, off Suffolk, England.

And on this day in 1774, Rhode Island became the first colony to prohibit the importation of slaves.

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June 14 - 

On this day in 1615, Jacques Le Maire sailed to Zuidland, Terra Australis.

And on this day in 1658, the English & French fleet beat Spanish forces at the Battle at Dunes.

And also on this day in 1673, the Battle at Schooneveld took place, wherein Michiel de Ruyter beat the French and English fleet.

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June 15 - 

On this day in 1643, Able Tasman returned to Batavia after discovering Tasmania.

And on this day in 1741, Capt Bering left Petropavlovsk, sailing to America.

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June 16 - 

On this day in 1671, Russian cossack pirates Stenka Razin and his brother Frol Razin were captured at Kaganlyk, his last fortress, and carried to Moscow, where, after bring tortured, Stenka was quartered alive at Lobnoye Mesto. 

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June 17
 
On this day in 1579, Sir Francis Drake landed on the coast of California at Drakes Bay and named it "New Albion".

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  • June 17 - 

    On this day in 1704, Major Sewall appeared at Boston with a strong guard and brought pirates and gold that he had seized, and gave His Excellency a full Account of his procedure in seizing them. The prisoners were committed to Goal for trial and the Gold was delivered to the Treasurer and committee appointed to receive the same. The service of Major Sewall and Company was very well accepted and rewarded by the Governour. 

     

    June 18 - 

    On this day in 1629, a sea battle at Dungeness occurred wherein Piet Heyn beat the Dunkirkers, commerce raiders in the service of the Spanish Monarchy.

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July 6 - 

 

On this day in 1685, Lauren de Graff was seen on Isla de Pinos presiding over a gathering of buccaneers. After his departure, he led yet another raid on Campeche. After a protracted battle, the Spaniards fled the town, leaving the pirates with a city devoid of plunder. The length of the battle and delay in attacking had allowed residents to move goods away. After two months in the town the pirates, failing to secure a ransom, began to burn the town and execute prisoners.

 

And on this day in 1699, Captain William Kidd was arrested at the home of Lord Bellomont.

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July 7 - 

On this day in 1730, Olivier Levasseur was taken to Saint-Denis, Réunion and hanged for piracy at 5 p.m.

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