William Brand

On this day in history...

485 posts in this topic

July 21 -



On this day in 1721, William Kennedy was executed at Execution Dock, Wapping, along with Howell Davis.



And on this day in 1823, the U. S. schooners of war Greyhound and Beagle came to anchor off Cape Cruz, and Lieut.



"Kearney went in his boat to reconnoitre the shore, when he was fired on by a party of pirates who were concealed among the bushes. Fire was also opened from several pieces of cannon erected on a hill, a short distance off. The boat returned, and five or six others were manned from the vessels, and pushed off for the shore, but a very heavy cannonade being kept up by the pirates on the heights, as well as from the boats were compelled to retreat. The two schooners were then warped in, when they discharged several broadsides, and covered the landing of the boats. After a short time the pirates retreated to a hill that was well fortified. A small hamlet, in which the pirates resided was set fire to and destroyed. Three guns, one a four pounder, and two large swivels, with several pistols, cutlasses, and eight large boats, were captured. A cave, about 150 feet deep, was discovered, near where the houses were, and after considerable difficulty, a party of seamen got to the bottom, where was found an immense quantity of plunder, consisting of broadcloths, dry goods, female dresses, saddlery, Many human bones were also in the cave, supposed to have been unfortunate persons who were taken and put to death. A great deal of the articles were brought away and the rest destroyed. About forty pirates escaped to the heights, but many were supposed to have been killed, from the fire of the schooners, as well as from the men who landed. The bushes were so thick that it was impossible to go after them. Several other caves are in the neighborhood, in which it was conjectured they occasion ally take shelter."


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July 22 -



On this day in 1713, Rogers' expedition arrived at Nassau Harbor, surprising and trapping a ship commanded by pirate Charles Vane. Negotiations ensued, but failed, and Vane used a captured French vessel as a fireship in an attempt to ram the naval vessels. The attempt failed, but the naval vessels were forced out of the west end of Nassau harbor, giving Vane's crew an opportunity to raid the town and secure the best local pilot. Vane and his men then escaped in a small sloop via the harbor's narrow east entrance. The pirates had evaded the trap, but Nassau and New Providence Island were left in Rogers' hands.



On this same day and year, a minor engagement took place between Sweden and Russia.




July 23 -



July 23, 1718 - This date was selected for pardon for all acts of piracy committed by surrendering pirates. Some chose the pardon and some didn't.


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July 24 -



On this day in 1534, the colonization of New France began in North America during a period beginning with the exploration of the Saint Lawrence River by Jacques Cartier.




July 25 -



On this day in 1689, France declared war on England. This was just one of many wars of the Golden Age that would create excellent conditions for privateering, smuggling and piracy.



And speaking of wars, on this day in 1722, the Three Years War begins along the Maine and Massachusetts border.



Also on this day in 1729, North Carolina became a royal colony.




July 26 -



1718 July 26: Governor Woodes Rogers arrives in New Providence to rid the colony of pirates.



On this day in 1499, Alonso dhe Ojeda discovered Curacao Island.



On this day in 1519, Francisco Pizzaro received a royal charter for the west coast of South America, and 10 years to the day later he was appointed governor of Peru.



Also on this day in 1579, Francis Drake left San Francisco to cross the Pacific Ocean.



And on this day in 1678, England & Netherlands signed a treaty and sent an ultimatum to France.



July 27 -



On this day in 1549, the ship of Jesuit priest Francis Xavier reached Japan.



Also on this day in 1586, Sir Walter Raleigh brought the first tobacco to England from Virginia.



And on this day in 1661, English Parliament confirmed the Navigation Act.



Then on this day in 1714, the Battle at Hango (Hangut) took place, wherein the Russians beat the Swedish fleet.



Annnnnd on this day in 1720. the second important victory of the Russian Navy took place at the Battle of Grengam.




July 28 -



On this day in 1586, Sir Thomas Harriot introduced potatoes to Europe on his return to England.



Also on this day in 1609, Admiral George Somers settled in Bermuda.



And on this day in 1708, Monarch Amengkurat II [sunan Mas] of Mataram gave himself up to the VOC (Dutch East India Company).


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July 29 -



Stede Bonnet is believed to have been born on this day in 1688, as he was christened at Christ Church parish on 29 July 1688.



Also, on this day in 1609, Samuel de Champlain shoots and kills two Iroquois chiefs at Ticonderoga, New York setting the stage for French-Iroquois conflicts for the next 150 years.



And on this day in 1715, the first of many Spanish treasure galleons sank off the Florida coast during a hurricane.




July 30 -



On this day in 1715, the last of the Spanish Treasure fleet disappeared off St Lucie near the Sebastian inlet, off Florida's treasure coast; only one ship made it to safety. Spanish ships had been returning to Spain from the mines in Terra Firma. The ships were laden with silver, gold, emeralds, tobacco, exotic spices, indigo and exotic fruit. The fleet was struck by an unexpected and deadly hurricane. The ships with their treasure sank to the ocean floor. There were an estimated 1500 survivors who struggled to the shore between what is today Sebastian and Fort Pierce. They set up camp on a barrier island and their existence was a terrible one to say the least. Many buried themselves up to their necks in sand to protect themselves from mosquitoes and no see um's. People have been searching for treasure there ever since.



And on this day 1729, the City of Baltimore was founded.


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August 13 -



On this day in 1608, John Smith's story of Jamestown's first days was submitted for publication.


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August 20 -



On this day in 1720, Adam, a boatswain that sailed Condent, received a share of 2,000 pounds sterling after robbing an Arabian bagala bound from Jeddah to Surat.



"The Pirates shared out their booty at St. Mary's [Madagascar] and then broke up the Company. After a time there came a Snow from Bristol the master of which they paid very liberally to convey a petition from them for pardon to the Governor of Mascarenhas, which he granted on condition they burnt their ship. They agreed to this, burnt the Flying Dragon and about 40 of them went to Mascarenhas."


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August 24 -



1608 - On this day in 1608, the first English convoy landed at Surat, India.



And on this day in 1658, the Battle at Grevelingen saw the defeat of Spanish forces by the English.



And in 1704, the Battle of Malaga, the largest naval battle in the War of the Spanish Succession, created a strategic victory of the Grand Alliance.




August 25 -



1729 August 25: Woodes Rogers arrive in Nassau to begin his second term as Governor of the Bahamas.



On 25 August 1685, Charles Swan separated from his confederates Peter Harris and Edward Davis, and sailed up the coast of Mexico, but met with little success.



And on this day in 1718, hundreds of French colonists arrived in the Louisiana area and New Orleans was founded.


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August 26 -



On this day in 1641, the West India Company conquerored Sao Paulo de Loanda, Angola.



And on this day in 1651, the Battle of Plymouth took place. General-at-Sea George Ayscue of the Commonwealth of England attacked a convoy of the Dutch Republic commanded by Vice-Commodore Michiel de Ruyter. The Dutch were victorious.


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September 14 -

On this day in 1718, Rogers received word that Vane was at Green Turtle Cay near Abaco, about 120 miles (190 km) north of Nassau.[46][47] Some of the pardoned pirates on New Providence took boats to join Vane, and Rogers decided to send two ex-pirate captains, Benjamin Hornigold and John Cockram, with a crew to gather intelligence, and, if possible, to bring Vane to battle.

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September 19 -



International Talk Like a Pirate Day (ITLAPD, September 19) is a parodic holiday created in 1995 by John Baur (Ol' Chumbucket) and Mark Summers (Cap'n Slappy), of Albany, Oregon, U.S., who proclaimed September 19 each year as the day when everyone in the world should talk like a pirate. For example, an observer of this holiday would greet friends not with "Hello," but with "Ahoy, matey!" The holiday, and its observance, springs from a romanticized view of the Golden Age of Piracy. It has become a holiday for members of the Church of the Flying Spaghetti Monster.



"Cap'n Slappy" and "Ol' Chumbucket", the founders of Talk Like a Pirate Day


According to Summers, the day is the only holiday to come into being as a result of a sports injury. He has stated that during a racquetball game between Summers and Baur, one of them reacted to the pain with an outburst of "Aaarrr!", and the idea was born. That game took place on June 6, 1995, but out of respect for the observance of D-Day, they chose Summers' ex-wife's birthday, as it would be easy for him to remember.


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September 20 -



On this day in 1715, pirate Nicholas Wingfield was baptized in Hastings, Sussex, England. He was hung for piracy in 1759 at the London Execution Dock. There were 4 executions on that day. Joseph Halsey for Murder, Nicholas Wingfield for Piracy, Thomas Hide for Piracy, and William Lawrence for Piracy.


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September 28 -


1528 - Spanish fleet sinks in Florida hurricane; about 380 die



September 29 -


61 BC - Pompey the Great celebrates his third triumph for victories over the pirates and the end of the Mithridatic Wars on his 45th birthday.


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September 30 -



On this day in 1659, the fictional character Robinson Crusoe was shipwrecked (according to author Daniel Defoe).


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October 1 -



On this day in 1675, a proclamation for the apprehension of pirate Don Philip Hellen was issued.


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October 4 -



On this day in history, the Danish ship Dannebroge exploded and sank in the Great Northern War during the action of of October 4, 1710



Also on this day in 1744, the first rate HMS Victory was lost in a storm near Salcombe.


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October 5 -



On this day in 1718, John Augur set sail to a neighboring island to secure cows and hogs sufficient to breed them for food at "Providence". Provisions were scarce due to the regular plundering of stock by pirates.


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October 7 -



On this day in 1492, Christopher Columbus missed Florida when he changed course.



And on this day in 1571, the Turkish fleet was defeated by Spanish and Italians in the Battle of Lepanto.


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October 8 -



On this day in 1717, William Rhett of Charleston, South Carolina attacked the Stede Bonnet's pirate ship Royal James. The pirates were defeated and captured. Ignatius Pell, Stede's boatswain, was pardoned after agreeing to testify against his fellow shipmates.


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October 14 -
The ship 'Swan' bearing tobacco, and under command of David Robertson, was forced into an involuntary landing by privateers and wrecked at Lough Swain, or Swinna, in Scotland. He petitioned the Lords of the Treasury for compensation on this day in 1698. They recommend ½ penny a pound to be taken for the tobacco-saved.
Also on this day the following year in 1689, there is this historic note about the purchase of 'saltpetre', or potassium nitrate used in the making of gunpowder.
"Letter from the Officers of Ordnance to the Lords of the Treasury, expressing the opinion that we ought to have a thousand tons of saltpetre in store at least, and having but 300 tons, submitting it to their Lordships whether they had not better contract for 500 tons with the East India Company."

And on this day in 1711, Woodes Rogers’ expedition returned home after circumnavigating the world and capturing a Manila galleon.

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October 15 -



On this day in 1672, the fourth rate frigate, HMS Kent, sank off Cromer.



And on this day 1696, A report from the East India Company's factory at Bombay indicated the serious concern the Company displayed to the disruption of trade being caused by pirates:



“Besides the Gunsway, the Mogul's own ships were robbed last year near Surat, and barbarously used. Abdul Gophoor has had a ship robbed of a great sum of money in the Gulf of Persia, and today we have news from Mocha, of two of the Company's ships being taken. The loss of one of them in which was 60,000 rupees, has almost broke some of the mer­chants in Bombay, as the loss amounts to £75,000. The East India Company lost 80 tons of good new coffee in her. They were taken by two small pirates, of 13 and 14 guns, each with 150 Englishmen as crew".


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October 16 -



On this day in 1707, Defoe, never one to shrink from a chance to question local government, made a commentary on 'pyrates' concerning the local English commercial institutions…



"It would make a sad Chasm on the Exchange of London, if all the pyrates should be taken away from the Merchants there, whether we be understood to speak of your Literal or Allegorical Pyrates; whether I should mean the Clandestine Trade Pyrates, who pyrite upon fair trade at home; the Custom-stealing Pyrates, who pyrite upon the Government; the Owling Pyrates, who rob the Manufacturers , the privateering Pyrates, who rob by Law."


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October 17 -



On this day in 1720, George Shelvocke and his men escaped their marooning at Juan Fernandez Island aboard a makeshift pinnace they had built after the wreck of their ship 'Speedwell'.


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October 19 -



On this day in 1693, Thomas Tew arrived at Madagascar aboard the Amity.



And on this day in 1696, six members of Henry Every's crew were indicted on charges of piracy. One of the witnesses for the defense during the trial was William Dampier. They were exonerated, but later retried on charges of mutiny and theft of the Charles II and found guilty.


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October 21 -



On this day in 1697, the Council of Trade and Plantations in Maryland discussed the conflicting laws of transporting convicts, so that merchants and privateers alike could transport convicts to some colonies, but not others. The problem of trafficking convicts as cargo to various colonies would continue well into the 18th century.



And on this day in 1707, French privateers Claude de Forbin and Rene Duguay-Trouin defeated the English convoy in the Battle of the Lizard, during the War of the Spanish Succession near Lizard Point, Cornwall.


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October 22 -



On this day in 1707, the second rate ship 'HMS Association', the third rate 'Eagle', and the fireship 'Firebrand' were wrecked during the Scilly naval disaster killing well over 800 men.



And on this day in 1720, Calico Jack Rackham, Mary Read, Anne Bonny, and others were captured.



And also on this day in 1728, Woodes Rogers was reappointed as governor of the Bahamas following the publication of a 'General History of the Robberies and Murders of the Most Notorious Pyrates', published under the pseudonym Captain Charles Johnson. The publication had helped Rogers regain the favor of King George I, and the favor of the king's son George the II.


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