Captain Mauvebeard

Tied to me belt

8 posts in this topic

This may seem a stupid question but could anyone tell me how things were usually attached to a belt to allow them to still be used i.e. money purses etc?

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If you're asking in a period correct sense, my impression is that they didn't put a lot of stuff on their belt. In fact, my garb (and most PC garb that I've seen) has a waistcoat covering the belt, even if it's a short sailor's waist coat. So hanging stuff from it would be underneath clothing and awfully inconvenient to get at. (This may be a plus when dealing with thieves, of course. But it would make it that much harder for you to get to as well.)

If you're not asking in a PC sense, I don't know because my belt is always under my waistcoat. :)

The real answer to the PC question is scattered all over the place. However, some topics that may be of interest to you if you want to research it:

What they carried?

Hanging Tankard without offense?

Sword Carriages

Cartridge Boxes?

Belts! (Not as useful as it sounds, other than for proving there were thin belts in use at the time.)

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Many thanks Mission, that's great

:D

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A lot of the little things that might be tied to a belt, were more likely carried in a market wallet, haversack or snapsack. In almost all paintings and engravings of the period, working men and sailors are shown carrying personal items about in one of these carrying 'bags', sometimes on the end of a walking stick.

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Where did they find the Gunnister Man's purse? The one you guys had at FTPI looked like something you would hang from a belt.

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Yes, this is a reconstruction, but, to my mind the purse strings do not appear substanial enough to use to tie to a belt, and are simple drawstrings for closure.

http://www.rls.org.uk/database/record.php?usi=000-000-489-014-C&searchdb=scran&PHPSESSID=o9tvrsl4tkd24hhra9iug06o86&theme=6

http://www.shetland-museum.org.uk/downloads/data/GunnisterMan_Leaflet.pdf

Addendum: herein lies the answer to the good surgeon's query: http://archaeologydataservice.ac.uk/catalogue/adsdata/arch-352-1/dissemination/pdf/vol_086/86_030_042.pdf

The purse was found inside the breeches, as if in a pocket.

Edited by Quartermaster James

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Addendum: herein lies the answer to the good surgeon's query: http://archaeologydataservice.ac.uk/catalogue/adsdata/arch-352-1/dissemination/pdf/vol_086/86_030_042.pdf

The purse was found inside the breeches, as if in a pocket.

What an interesting document! Thank you for finding it and posting it.

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Ha ha ha! Gunnister man hated sewing button-holes too!

"The high round neck is faced inside but has no collar. It buttons to below the waist with twenty buttons, slightly more than 1 in. apart. Below these are another four buttons, the corresponding "holes" being stitched at the ends, but uncut." (Audrey S. Henshall & Stuart Maxwell, "Clothing and Other Articles from a Late 17th-Century Grave at Gunnister, Shetland.", PROCEEDINGS OF THE SOCIETY, 1951-52, p. 32)

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