Jib

What would make you STOP being a pirate???

57 posts in this topic

Have you ever considered, after a particularly brutal event, just hanging up the tricorn, cutlass and the black flag? Stopped being a pirate for a hobby?

It doesn't matter if you are a historical reenactment performer, pirate entertainer, or just really like pirates and enjoy dressing up and playing the part! Do you have a break point or level that could drive you away?

What could make you so disappointed, saddened or angry enough to give up being a pirate?

Have you come close to leaving the hobby? Ever taken time away?

Or is it that important that you could never say farewell?

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Been there-done that all-of-the-above a few times now.

Snobby/arrogant people, arrogant event organizers, ridiculous rules and restrictions, burn-out, and lack of time and funds have all contributed to my past comings and goings. I always come back like a bad penny though. I just love history and playing it out through costume and events combining that with educating the public makes it happen for me, in spite of the things that irk me personally. In the end, I have to remind myself why I do these things: not for me alone, but for the educational aspect. Call it "edutainment" if you will.

I suspect that it would take death to finally take me out of the hobby.

Bo

Edited by Capt. Bo of the WTF co.

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My love of the sea and history brought me to the hobby, so I'll be around for the long haul. This is not to say that I haven't a break from time to time to devote time and energy to other hobbies, life and family, but I keep coming back to it.

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Every time I stop learning, I move on to a new obsession hobby.

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A few more kids might do it, although probably not for good. The closest I have ever come was after a private, full-immersion event for a different time period that I organized. I have never been pushed back so hard: people trying to throw off the dynamic of the event, refusing to participate or stay in character (for a private, invitation-only event, mind you!), or using modern concessions to safety and cleanliness to secure more status or advantage for what amounted to two days of camping. It was so frustrating that I almost sold everything I had on craigslist for $500 - thousands of dollars of stuff - just to be rid of any temptation to go back to any kind fo reenacting at all. My wife was pregnant at the time, it was a hard pregnancy, and I very much resented taking time away from her if the event was just going to devolve into me playing governess to a bunch of adults who should have known better acting like socipathic children. It made me appreciate event organizers a lot more, believe me.

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Went through that last year... A Spiritual conviction brought me about to even cutting off my beard and coming damn close to taking everything in the Pirate cove, putting it on a trailer,and selling it at swap meet for cut rate prices just to rid myself of it all. Frankly Eye enjoy being around people who cosplay pirate, reenacting or Hollywood.. Not having anything to replace the time, energy, eye spend on this hobby ( and the excitement Eye am addicted to ), sorta kept me here. It truly is a Stranglehold I Love.. Hee HEe thats twisted , but hey !

However, Some Jealousy from those who Eye thought were my friends entered the picture and eye get sniped on, is something eye care not for,,,, so the fun wanes quickly.

Eye quit one group that eye loved and was a member of for many years due to Martial issues that eye did not want to hear murmurers about.

All the other reasons have already been sited so eye will not repeat them here.

Edited by oderlesseye

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I've pretty much been retired from it for a little over a year now.

I'm just waiting for the time and energy to get motivated to clear out the pyrate kit and such.

Why? Well the scene around the Pacific Northwest just isn't what I was hoping it to be.

Things around here are pretty much limited to the Kiddy festival, RenFaire redressed as pyrate, costumed dating pool, drunken binge sort of thing.

There's nothing going on around here to compare with the sort of things I've seen through the eyes of the pub.

Maybe it's because we don't have the history out here. Maybe it's just not the right time, people, place, etc.

In retrospect, I'm hard pressed to understand why I stayed with it out here so long.

Something between drunken inertia and hope ever springing eternal.

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Why? Well the scene around the Pacific Northwest just isn't what I was hoping it to be.

Things around here are pretty much limited to the Kiddy festival, RenFaire redressed as pyrate, costumed dating pool, drunken binge sort of thing.

There's nothing going on around here to compare with the sort of things I've seen through the eyes of the pub.

Maybe it's because we don't have the history out here. Maybe it's just not the right time, people, place, etc.

In retrospect, I'm hard pressed to understand why I stayed with it out here so long.

Something between drunken inertia and hope ever springing eternal.

Travel has been key to my love of the hobby. Historical immersion at the events that I've been lucky to attend keeps me coming back. Every time we get together in the Midwest and the East Coast we bemoan the lack of historic draws on the West Coast. There are so many fantastic, scenic venues in the West that could support historic events. I'm surprised that there isn't more 'Spanish Colonial' represented at California events as far North as Drake's Bay.

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I was pretty much out of it when I joined the pub. I'd had enough of negativity, large festivals, bureaucracy and other people. My love of costumes, crafting and enjoyment of the pub has kept me trickling along. :rolleyes:

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You could always join the Mercury crew. We're pretty much free of the internal BS. (Although we tend to focus on period correct outfits - not to the exclusion of fantasy, but it is sort of our raison d'être.)

As for negativity, I find you get whatever you focus on in that regard. There is always negativity in everything, just as there is positivity. Yin and yang and whatnot. So I find I can choose what I want from any environment.

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Ok......I second the motion that you should join the Crew of the Mercury !!!!! I think you made a motion Raphael....or was it a suggestion........QM James you decide.... Yo Ho!

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Well, the only remotely period stuff I've worked on lately has been the Ottoman Empire related stuff. Though I'm considering doing some Norse costuming for a Mead and Meat winter gala.

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Its more a reflection of my life on the coast. With that I never really get tired of playing pirate. Some events are tiring but there is a mental state and it seems to radiate loudly in me.

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After about five or six years of driving long distances to play, it was the expense and logistics that made me and my husband cut back. Ojai closed, and NorCal has become a scene of chaos that, other than time spend on the Aldebaran, was becoming more chore than fun, and costing us upward of $1000 or more—and we always drove. Also, we have horses, and the lady who used to feed them for us while we were away moved to another town. We haven't found anyone we trust to take her place. Also, burnout played a part. So, this year we attended only one event in Brookings, OR, afflieated ourselves eith a new group, The Seacats, while also envolving ourselves in other activites, mostly to do with the SCA or mounted archery. I still love playing a pirate, and we had an absolute blast at the smaller venue of Brookings, so I suspect I'll hang in there a while longer. B)

Jamie....nice to see you're still around. Wish we could connect more than once every two years or so.

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Ahhh... yes... well, money would be the killer for me. I know it killed my attending Rev War reenactments. Not much else could kill my wanting to do Piracy unless there was nothing for me to do at all. But, pretty much money is the murderer of my fun. Just got back from pirating (which I do rarely now) and Lord God Almighty! OUCH! Too much! And I'm talking about gas alone! I camped and brought food, but the gas... lord! Mind ye, mates... NONE of my events - Rev War or Piracy - are nearby. Most events are on average 5-6 hours away! Those of ye who travel a long distance know my pain! I know it's hopeless but I do still keep praying for lower prices in gas. Lower prices means more traveling and events for me.

~Lady B

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I have been a pyrate since I got my first command at about age eight, sailing the waters of Warner's Bayou, the Manatee River and Tampa Bay. An Optimist Pram, ten feet long. Bright canary yellow it was. Sailed one day to Egmont Key when I was eleven, past Anna Maria Sound and out into the Gulf of Mexico, a truly stupid thing to do, in hindsight. When I was older I sailed with a man called Doc Payne (real name, a urologist, which makes it even more, ah, painful.) We did actually board other boats during Yacht Club races to commandeer ice, rum and (occasionally) wenches. I was called Captain Jim in high school, and again in Kentucky, but for different reasons; one as an honorific and one as derision.

But that is not the same as portraying, or playing, if you will, a pyrate as an adult. Explaining this to other adults is sometimes...problematic. The expense and the travel keep me from seeing all my pyrate friends as much as I like. Three kids at my age also play a part. Attending events is sometimes difficult. But does that mean I will ever stop being a Pyrate? No.

Once you have truly embraced the idea of Pyrate with all of the good, the bad and the ugly of the history, the freedom, spirituality and terror of the sea, the rage against societal constraints, the desperation (perhaps you feel it in your job) that would lead one to become a pyrate, you can never completely set it aside. You can do Civil War and quit. Rev war and quit. Either World War and quit. But being a Pyrate will always call to you. Perhaps it is the lack of regimentation, the ability to add a lot of yourself to the role. Perhaps it is that we all chafe a bit at the constraints of society. Whatever it is, it will call to you. It will always be a part of you. While you may quit attending events and sell off your kit, you will never, ever, leave aside that nagging little voice that calls to you.

Edited by Captain Jim

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Yes.. the "attitude" that I have to remind myself of quite often: "No matter where ye goes, Thar ye arrrrr!"

Hee-hee. Life is what we make of the ingredients we find at our disposal. I often lose perspective myself and have to realign the gears occaisionally. It helps me to cover several venues, so I do colonial, pyrate, MO/KS Border War, and American War of Northern Agression B) . I switch focus from one period to another as I find myself waning in interest for whatever reason. Downside of that: It makes things more expensive covering gear and weapons for all those different areas of history.

Bo

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I have been a pyrate since I got my first command at about age eight, sailing the waters of Warner's Bayou, the Manatee River and Tampa Bay. An Optimist Pram, ten feet long. Bright canary yellow it was. Sailed one day to Egmont Key when I was eleven, past Anna Maria Sound and out into the Gulf of Mexico, a truly stupid thing to do, in hindsight. When I was older I sailed with a man called Doc Payne (real name, a urologist, which makes it even more, ah, painful.) We did actually board other boats during Yacht Club races to commandeer ice, rum and (occasionally) wenches. I was called Captain Jim in high school, and again in Kentucky, but for different reasons; one as an honorific and one as derision.

But that is not the same as portraying, or playing, if you will, a pyrate as an adult. Explaining this to other adults is sometimes...problematic. The expense and the travel keep me from seeing all my pyrate friends as much as I like. Three kids at my age also play a part. Attending events is sometimes difficult. But does that mean I will ever stop being a Pyrate? No.

Once you have truly embraced the idea of Pyrate with all of the good, the bad and the ugly of the history, the freedom, spirituality and terror of the sea, the rage against societal constraints, the desperation (perhaps you feel it in your job) that would lead one to become a pyrate, you can never completely set it aside. You can do Civil War and quit. Rev war and quit. Either World War and quit. But being a Pyrate will always call to you. Perhaps it is the lack of regimentation, the ability to add a lot of yourself to the role. Perhaps it is that we all chafe a bit at the constraints of society. Whatever it is, it will call to you. It will always be a part of you. While you may quit attending events and sell off your kit, you will never, ever, leave aside that nagging little voice that calls to you.

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Very well put....and very true......many things may keep you from outwardly displaying your piratage....but it will always remain in your heart !!!!!!

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I think that's very true. When you compare the piracy world with other reenactment groups, the lack of regimentation is a huge factor in how much fun it is. The only thing that could kind of compare, is maybe Steampunk, which also has little to no regimentation or rules other than stick to the general idea of the genre. I enjoy the SCA, but it's a relief to come back to the pirate world and the pirate in me, with no one to bow down to or kiss up to. B)

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If cash flow was not an issue (let's say it's a limitation) could you imagine a situation that could convince you to stop playing pirate?

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also...

Eye mentioned that sometimes a group of people or an event can put a bitter taste in one's mouth. Could you imagine a group or event that would wreck your love for playing piracy? Say the demise of a favored pirate event or change in management. Another idea would be a change in the group of people with whom you engage at various events.

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If other people's actions cause you to stop reenacting, you have decided to let them control you.

Why would you do that?

I can see finding new people or new events if the old ones aren't serving you, but to quit the hobby because you don't like the way someone else behaves? Nah.

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If cash flow was not an issue (let's say it's a limitation) could you imagine a situation that could convince you to stop playing pirate?

also...

Eye mentioned that sometimes a group of people or an event can put a bitter taste in one's mouth. Could you imagine a group or event that would wreck your love for playing piracy? Say the demise of a favored pirate event or change in management. Another idea would be a change in the group of people with whom you engage at various events.

If money was not an issue, there would be a boat in this picture. As for twits spoiling one's fun, twits will be with us always. Many here have had that experience and just found another group or event. Or created one of their own.

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When Harry left Fort Taylor to be with family, we though that we'd have trouble getting the new guy to see the event our way. Not so. While he was rigid on many points we broke him and he went pirate.

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