Swashbuckler 1700

swearing among pirates alike

54 posts in this topic

Shock me blue.

is THAT period? great expression either way

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THAT is Mission-speak. But I'm running us OT, so I'd better stop now. Sacrebleu! (Itself a term that may date all the way back to the 12th c.)

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I thoroughly recommend checking out the poetry of John Wilmot, Earl of Rochester, for a true insight into naughty words of the late 17th century. Or indeed some of the ballads of the age. For example:

Portsmouth's Return, 1682

Our Monarch's whore from France is come

Since Vandom's Bugg'ring Tarse

Has fallen foul on Crequy's Bum,

Instead of Portsmouth's A**e

So great affront would make one run

From such a wicked place

Where A**e has had such honour done

And C**t in such disgrace

Now she's return'd bright as the Sun

So sparkish & so fair

And brought great Charles a butter'd Bun

A present from Navarr:

She had not gone, but to contrive

New fashions for the Court;

Both how to Dress, and how to Swive,

And to improve that Sport

Buckley obligingly has brought

Both for herself, and Friends,

New swinging Dildoes, richly wrought

With Satin & Velvet ends:

With Furling water, to draw't up streight,

And Rowels to heighten delights

New-fashion'd Springs, to Scour her Twat

From slimy sperm, & whites.

Now Nelly you must be content

Her grace begins her Reign

For all your Brat, you may be sent

To Dorset back again

Your Hagged Carcase yeilds no delight,

As Grafton of late has said

Nor Jennings, nor betraying Knight

Can bring you to Charles's Bed

Portsmouth has play'd so damn'd a trick

Mazarine is sore distrest

She's taken to herself his Pr**k

Bought Dildoes for the rest

But Stallion Pilty swears by C**t

He'll F**k with all his might

For to avenge the great affront

And set his Dutchess right

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I thoroughly recommend checking out the poetry of John Wilmot, Earl of Rochester, for a true insight into naughty words of the late 17th century. Or indeed some of the ballads of the age. For example:

Portsmouth's Return, 1682

Our Monarch's whore from France is come

Since Vandom's Bugg'ring Tarse

Has fallen foul on Crequy's Bum,

Instead of Portsmouth's A**e

So great affront would make one run

From such a wicked place

Where A**e has had such honour done

And C**t in such disgrace

Now she's return'd bright as the Sun

So sparkish & so fair

And brought great Charles a butter'd Bun

A present from Navarr:

She had not gone, but to contrive

New fashions for the Court;

Both how to Dress, and how to Swive,

And to improve that Sport

Buckley obligingly has brought

Both for herself, and Friends,

New swinging Dildoes, richly wrought

With Satin & Velvet ends:

With Furling water, to draw't up streight,

And Rowels to heighten delights

New-fashion'd Springs, to Scour her Twat

From slimy sperm, & whites.

Now Nelly you must be content

Her grace begins her Reign

For all your Brat, you may be sent

To Dorset back again

Your Hagged Carcase yeilds no delight,

As Grafton of late has said

Nor Jennings, nor betraying Knight

Can bring you to Charles's Bed

Portsmouth has play'd so damn'd a trick

Mazarine is sore distrest

She's taken to herself his Pr**k

Bought Dildoes for the rest

But Stallion Pilty swears by C**t

He'll F**k with all his might

For to avenge the great affront

And set his Dutchess right

it seems that f**k is that old hmmmm....

Damnation is swearing not allowed here? *****

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From GHoP in section of Black Bart

" .... Sutton used to be very prophane; he happening to be in the same Irons with another Prisoner, who was more serious than ordinary, and read and pray'd often, as became his Condition; this Man Sutton used to swear at, and ask him, what he proposed by so much Noise and Devotion? Heaven, says the other, I hope, Heaven, you Fool, says Sutton, did you ever hear of any Pyrates going thither? Give me H—ll, it's a merrier Place; I'll give Roberts a Salute of 13 Guns at Entrance...."

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That is some poetry! With a bit of updating, John Wilmot could do the comedy circuit in America.

I had to look this one up because it sounded clever. (Alas, it really isn't IMO.): tarse (obsolete) - the penis

In medical books, it's often called the 'yard.'

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Forum rules prevent me from posting the answer (that and my English sense of decorum).

Englishman. I would like a hint if you have any time to spare between the tea times ;)

Edited by Swashbuckler 1700

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That is some poetry! With a bit of updating, John Wilmot could do the comedy circuit in America.

I had to look this one up because it sounded clever. (Alas, it really isn't IMO.): tarse (obsolete) - the penis

In medical books, it's often called the 'yard.'

One of my favourite quotes from a period court case: "he thrust his yard into my fundament"

SB1700, it rhymes with hunt, and if you have it in Finnish it's probably called the 'K' word.

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That is some poetry! With a bit of updating, John Wilmot could do the comedy circuit in America.

I had to look this one up because it sounded clever. (Alas, it really isn't IMO.): tarse (obsolete) - the penis

In medical books, it's often called the 'yard.'

One of my favourite quotes from a period court case: "he thrust his yard into my fundament"

SB1700, it rhymes with hunt, and if you have it in Finnish it's probably called the 'K' word.

I see

what that a pirate court case?

(you may never know what they did)

I have always thought that Gaop people would be more religious and would not swear very much but I was wrong ( damn I have often too clean vision of history)

Edited by Swashbuckler 1700

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Both rude or playful...

SLUT. c.1400, "a dirty, slovenly, or untidy woman," probably cognate with dialectal Ger. Schlutt "slovenly woman," dialectal Swed. slata "idle woman, slut," and Du. slodder "slut," but the ultimate origin is doubtful. Chaucer uses sluttish (late 14c.) in reference to the appearance of an untidy man. Also "a kitchen maid, a drudge" (mid-15c.; hard pieces in a bread loaf from imperfect kneading were called slut's pennies, 18c.). Meaning "woman of loose character, bold hussy" is attested from mid-15c.; playful use of the word, without implication of loose morals, is attested from 1660s.

Our little girl Susan is a most admirable slut, and pleases us mightily. [Pepys, diary, Feb. 21, 1664]

BULLY. c.1737, a supposed or pretend Husband to a Whore; also a huffing Fellow, a pretended Bravo, but a Coward at the Bottom.

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Approach as in Approachable wanton or to know carnally.

Bachelor's Wife, Whore

Bachelor's Baby, Bastard child (1672)

And, not a swear word at all, but too interesting not to mention. Aqua-bob, an icicle (1704)

Interesting enough, the word 'ain't' is attributed to Cockneys of London before 1701.

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One of my favourite quotes from a period court case: "he thrust his yard into my fundament"

SB1700, it rhymes with hunt, and if you have it in Finnish it's probably called the 'K' word.

I see

what that a pirate court case?

(you may never know what they did)

While we may not know, remember the discussion on that nearly useless book Sodomy and the Pirate Tradition that Burg couldn't find any evidence of such. He would have been all over such a court case. He might have written a whole series of new books on that case alone given that he managed to write the first one without any solid proof at all.

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One of my favourite quotes from a period court case: "he thrust his yard into my fundament"

SB1700, it rhymes with hunt, and if you have it in Finnish it's probably called the 'K' word.

I see

what that a pirate court case?

(you may never know what they did)

While we may not know, remember the discussion on that nearly useless book Sodomy and the Pirate Tradition that Burg couldn't find any evidence of such. He would have been all over such a court case. He might have written a whole series of new books on that case alone given that he managed to write the first one without any solid proof at all.

The one who said that could be woman...

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I see

what that a pirate court case?

(you may never know what they did)

Sadly for Barry Burg, it was not a pirate case (though I seem to recall it featured in his book somewhere). Unsurprisingly, it was a sodomy case.

I have always thought that Gaop people would be more religious and would not swear very much but I was wrong ( damn I have often too clean vision of history)

Much of our view of the past is tempered by the very prudish Victorian ideals of the 19th century. We imagine that filth and obscenity are a modern phenomenon because our great-grandparents wouldn't have stood for it. But if you get back beyond the mid-19th century you'll find all sorts of lewdness, swearing, public nudity, bawdy songs and poems etc.

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I see

what that a pirate court case?

(you may never know what they did)

Sadly for Barry Burg, it was not a pirate case (though I seem to recall it featured in his book somewhere). Unsurprisingly, it was a sodomy case.

I have always thought that Gaop people would be more religious and would not swear very much but I was wrong ( damn I have often too clean vision of history)

Much of our view of the past is tempered by the very prudish Victorian ideals of the 19th century. We imagine that filth and obscenity are a modern phenomenon because our great-grandparents wouldn't have stood for it. But if you get back beyond the mid-19th century you'll find all sorts of lewdness, swearing, public nudity, bawdy songs and poems etc.

Actual I know that prudish Victorian ideals are more 19th century stuff but still. I have know it but not understand it too clearly....( the idea of old times as religious and clean time is not correct) I actually have make the same point somewhere but indeed good that you help me reminding that since I so often forget things. I am not lying I have thought same way but I still would believe those times more clean...

Since this is still historical I dare to hint this here and there is whatnot and notting prudish

search "18th century naval naughtiness" in google

Edited by Swashbuckler 1700

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I'm reading George Choundas's book "The Pirate Primer," (2007) and have found it quite interesting. All sorts of good stuff in there. Among the things he covers, are: Oaths, Epithets, and Curses----curse meaning a curse being placed upon someone or thing.

Curses include:

be damned to you with all my heart

be off to hell

blast you

blast your deadlights

blast your eyes

blind you

bloody end to you

bone-rot you

burn and blast your bones

a curse on you

a curse out of Egypt on you

damn you to the depths

devil burn you

eat that what falls from my tail

go to the devil when you please

God rot your bones

gut you for a ..........

hang you

here's a black passage to you

may every curse ever cursed light on and blast you

od rot the ____of you

od rot your bones

plague and perish you

a plague on your scurvy head

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Ha ha. This is a rather cutting remark from Hugh Ryder's introduction to his book New Practical Observations in Surgery Containing Divers Remarkable Cases and Cures:

"If any Zoile or Mome will be making Grimaces, and carping, my regard of them shall be less than of those small Insects, which let alone would spoil the best meat, if not corrected with a Fly-flap."

Zoile appears to be French for 'a wicked and envious critic'. Mome means 'A dull, silent person; a blockhead."

One can only wonder at what sort of device was used to kill flies (the meaning of a fly-flap) during this period. No doubt someone will produce examples. ;)

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And of course, "hella" originated from the streets of San Francisco in the Hunters Point neighborhood in the 20th century. It is commonly used in place of "really" or "very" when describing something. (What?)

Hella is an abrreviation of "Helleva"/"Hell of a" but has now expanded into usage where such isn't quite a literal replacement. A common usage is Hellaflush for wheel (rim/tire combos) fit very flush to the wheel well lip. You see it on decals on the back of said vehicle even.

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Quebecois curse words tend toward the sacrilegious as well. I don't know if it extends as far back as couer du bois, but it sure seems like a 17th century thing...

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From Rn articles of war 1661 http://www.british-h...rquery=articles

"The public Worship of God. 1. That all Co[m]manders Captaines and other Officers att Sea shall cause the publique Worshipp of Almighty God according to the Liturgy of the Church of

England established by Law to be solemnly orderly and reverently performed in theire respective Ships And that prayers and preachings by the respective Chaplaines in holy Orders of the respective Ships be performed diligently and that the Lords Day be observed according to Law.

Swearing, Drunkenness, &c.

2. Every person and persons in his Majesties pay using unlawfull and rash Oathes Cursings Execrations Drunkennes Uncleannes or other Scandalous Actions in derogation of Gods Honour and corruption of good manners shall be punished by Fine Imprisonment or otherwise as the Court Martiall shall thinke fitt."

and thinking Barry Burg now

:P. Here is an interesting rule. Think that always that what was banned was done, sometimes, otherwise they wouldn't have punishments for it. E.G There is no " don't bring pink elephants aboard" rule since there were no need for that.

"32. If any person or persons in or belonging to the Fleet shall commit the unnaturall and detestable sin of Buggery or Sodomy with Man or Beast he shall be punished with death without mercy."

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From our loved General history (Black-Bart's crew aboard prize ship Samuel):

" They tore up the Hatches and entered the Hold like a parcel of Furies, and with Axes and Cutlashes, cut and broke open all the Bales, Cases, and Boxes, they could lay their Hands on; and when any Goods came upon Deck, that they did not like to carry aboard, instead of tossing them into the Hold again,threw them over-board into the Sea; all this was done with incessant cursing and swearing, more like Fiends than Men.They carried with them, Sails, Guns, Powder, Cordage, and 8 or 9000 l. worth of the choicest Goods; and told Captain Cary, That they should accept of no Act of Grace; that the K— and P—t might be damned with their Acts of G— for them; neither would they go to Hope-Point, to be hang'd up a Sun drying, as Kidd's, and Braddish's Company were; but that if they should ever be overpower'd, they would set Fire to the Powder, with a Pistol, and go all merrily to Hell together."

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Ah, glad you dug this up. I found something while I was reading in Key West for you in The four years voyages of capt. George Roberts on page 376, but hadn't the time to put in here:

"I began to think I was got on Board a Pirate, for there was such swearing, cursing, &c. that it would have made a sober Man's Hair stand on End; and I was too weak to be able then to do much, having daily a Fever and Ague, and the Captain, poor Gentleman! almost in as bad a Condition, having also an Ague, tho' not so frequently. The Mate hove the Lead to sound, but we were out of Soundings: The Folks then swore, They would not heave up the Anchor; or if they did, they would not lay a Hand on any thing to work in her; they did not know what the Design was; and a thousand other such Speeches, attended with thundering Oaths and Curses, such as Ignorance, joined with arrogant Sawciness, is wont to produce; tho', at the same Time, it was the Negroes that did in a Manner all the Labour."

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That was Interesting Mission.

Here from "The history of the pyrates: containing the lives of Captain Mission. Captain Bowen. Captain Kidd ... and their several crews" (1728)

There is enough swearing I think. But I think this might be one of those romantic addition to the real story added by the writer

"I can't pass by in Silence, Capt. Bellamy's Speech to Capt. Beer. D—n my Bl—d, says he, I am sorry they won't let you have your Sloop again, for I scorn to do any one a Mischief, when it is not for my Advantage; damn the Sloop, we must sink her, and she might be of Use to you. Tho’, damn ye, you are a sneaking Puppy, and so are all those who will submit to be governed by Laws which rich Men have made for their own Security, for the cowardly Whelps have not the Courage otherwise to defend what they get by their Knavery; but damn ye altogether: Damn them for a Pack of crafty Rascals, and you, who serve them, for a Parcel of hen-hearted Numskuls. They villify us, the Scoundrels do, when there is only this Difference, they rob the Poor under the Cover of Law, forsooth, and we plunder the Rich under the Protection of our own Courage; had you not better make One of us, than sneak after the A—s of these Villains for Employment? Capt. Beer told him, that his Conscience would not allow him to break thro’ the Laws of God and Man. You are a devilish Conscience Rascal, d—n ye, replied Bellamy, I am a free Prince, and I have as much Authority to make War on the whole World, as he who has a hundred Sail of Ships at Sea, and an Army of 100,000 Men in the Field; and this my Conscience tells me; but there is no arguing with such sniveling Puppies, who allow Superiors to kick them about Deck at Pleasure; and pin their Faith upon a Pimp of a Parson; a Squab, who neither practices nor believes what he puts upon the chuckle-headed Fools he preaches to.—The pyrates wanting neither Provision nor Water, and the Whidaw's Damage being repaired, they past their Time very jovially. One of the Crew had been a Stroler, a Fellow who had pass'd thro’ a great many real as well as fictitious Scenes of Life,"

I find the name "Beer" rather amusing....

Edited by Swashbuckler 1700

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Source: Pirates and Buccaneers of the Atlantic Coast by Edward Rowe Snow

here some nice stuff

Governor Benjamin Fletcher of New York wrote about Thomas Tew who was asking for privateering commission in 1694:

“I wished in my mind to make him a sober man, and in particular to cure him of a vile habit of swearing”

William Atkinson, was detained by mutinous William Fly (or Fry) in 1726 , because of his superior navigational skills. Here is Fly’s message to the forced pilot

“Look ye, Captain Atkinson, it not that we care for your company, God damn ye, God damn my soul, if you don’t act like an honest man, god damn ye, and offer to play any rogue’s tricks, by God damn ye, and God sink me, but I will blow your brains out; God damn me if I don’t. Now Captain Atkinson, you may pilot us wrong, which god damn ye, would be a rascally trick, by God, because you would betray men who trust in you; but, by the eternal Jesus you shan't live to us hang’d…. If you will be a villain and betray your trust, may God strike me dead, and may I drink a bowl of brimstone and fire with the devil, if i don’t send you head-long to hell, God dam me…”

Edited by Swashbuckler 1700

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