Swashbuckler 1700

Some interesting pictures.

238 posts in this topic

A port of amserdam circa 1705

http://collections.r...ects/12417.html

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Ship are nice and so are the figures. Looking sailor I see a nice variation of clothing and such. Still it is bad that most of the proper period pictures are from Holland and only so few from Britain.... But at least we can see a lot of Dutch stuff.

The man (middle) with a red sash and tan jacket is like straight from this pictures.

b-k-Picart-1720-slops.jpg

And some other stuff

An admiral circa 1725

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http://collections.r...ects/14311.html

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More interesting pictures. Modern photos this time about old artifacts

I heard about one late 17th century shipwreck and found a page with info and pictures of the wreck finds

A jacket and hat found on a Swedish shipwreck of "Kronan" which sank (because of the admiral's incompetence) in 1676

image1_792f77c7911e43f949396216da3db6fc.jpg

Sandclasses found

image1_bd688f7925aff8cb58added4e84de205.jpg

and a cabinet

image2_cc04fe70acaf9afc4d5582050e0976df.jpg

for more info about this shipwreck. fortunately for us it has some info in English

http://www.kalmarlansmuseum.se/1/1.0.1.0/421/1/

Edited by Swashbuckler 1700

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A jacket and hat found on a Swedish shipwreck of "Kronan" which sank (because of the admiral's incompetence) in 1676

image1_792f77c7911e43f949396216da3db6fc.jpg

It's the Patrick Hand Original™ Planter's Hat! (Almost.)

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A jacket and hat found on a Swedish shipwreck of "Kronan" which sank (because of the admiral's incompetence) in 1676

image1_792f77c7911e43f949396216da3db6fc.jpg

It's the Patrick Hand Original™ Planter's Hat! (Almost.)

I remember stumbling on this picture before. While I wasn't searching for the clothing stuff, the box/chest in the background shows some great period examples of the narrow and small dovetails used at the time.

As for the clothing, first thing I thought was "Rip Van Winkle's Militia Service Uniform."

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Here is a man with an eye-patch and peg-leg in 1811

In this caricature he is flattened by a lady

http://collections.r...cts/127997.html

and this picture goes with that

I have posted this earlier but now it has better quality

http://collections.r...cts/143283.html

Edited by Swashbuckler 1700

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Question... can some one point me in the direction of the summary of this painting that says it is of a sea captain?

NAIVEU, Matthijs

The Cloth Shop

1709 Oil on canvas Stedelijk Museum, Leiden

l_zps3176c34c.png

as compared to Frans

Van Mieris’s “Cloth shop”

Frans_van_Mieris_I_-_The_Cloth_Shop_-_WGA15628_zps435fb284.jpg

much obliged...

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Well Foxe's Gallery says so http://www.picturetr...um/view/6655055 . though, as we have seen, there is some errors in that gallery (no offence to the maker).

Well the man with the coat is dressed much similarly than the Dutch mariners generally dressed (see the first page of this tread). Actually I personally see his hat to be a Brimmed Monmouth cap (PTG) commonly worn by the Dutch sailors. The other sailor figure is rather clearly a ship boy with a cap and bare feet. Also maritime themes of variety of sort were common in Dutch painting of the era so there were many maritime person featured in art as well. Holland was very clearly a maritime power those days, thought a fading one, and there were really many mariners the Netherlands. Also the painter was from Rotterdam which was one of the biggest sea port in Holland with some VOC operation there as well.

Well the other painting is pretty much different. Unlike the earlier painting the 1709 painting was an allegorical description of class differences (said in a history book that I have not handy. Unfortunately there weren't said who the figures were...).

But still the question remains: who are those figures?....

Edited by Swashbuckler 1700

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Speaking of Fox and images, he posted a link to a series of period hunting images on Facebook. They are really interesting.

Hollar Digital Collections

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Those are neat pictures ;)

There is even fishermen.. interesting indeed

Edited by Swashbuckler 1700

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http://openlibrary.org/books/OL22880932M/A_general_and_true_history_of_the_lives_and_actions_of_the_most_famous_highwaymen_murderers_street-r General history of pyrates, highwaymen, murders, &c. by Charles Johnson 1742. So a quite early work and it is apparently a later edition of 1736 book with just a little edited illustrations. there is some quite early illustrations but only few of pirates...

What I find interesting is that the illustrator is Benjamin Cole the same man who made the early 1724 pictures in GHop. But in 1725 and 1730s editions of Johnson's works there is pictures of different maker than Cole.

Also a Dutch 1700 edition of Buccaneers of America is nice

http://www.archive.org/stream/historiederboeca00exqu#page/n5/mode/2up

Edited by Swashbuckler 1700

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You can find most (and possibly all) of the images in those two books at the John Carter Brown library site.The scans there are very good and they are scalable so you can do pretty simple screen caps and get them that way in whatever detail you like. And this stuff isn't in copyright because the books are long out of copyright.

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Yep but in fact they are "different" pictures just really really similar but the artist is different. Those on the site you refer are from 1736 book and those I refer to are 1742 book

See the original 1736 print and the 1724 reprint

http://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/d/dc/Edward_Teach_Commonly_Call%27d_Black_Beard_%28bw%29.jpg

http://ia700308.us.archive.org/BookReader/BookReaderImages.php?zip=/8/items/generaltruehisto00defo/generaltruehisto00defo_jp2.zip&file=generaltruehisto00defo_jp2/generaltruehisto00defo_0184.jp2&scale=1.3651642475171888&rotate=0

One interesting thing (well I consider is as interesting) is that the latter one, which was clearly engraved using that old print as a model, ended up to be a mirror image. So the latter artist did not twist the image when he was copying it. So the latter is a mirrors image since the print is always other way around in the paper than the engraving in the copper plate.

This man was the engraver of the 1742 pictures http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Benjamin_Cole_(the instrument maker) as well as the artist behind the original 1724 Ghop pictures (like this http://digital.lib.ecu.edu/encore/ncgre000/00000001/00000857/00000857_ac_0001.jpg)

Edited by Swashbuckler 1700

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That is interesting, I had never noticed it before you pointed it out.

Still, one appears to have just copied the other - I don't think you're getting a whole new view or anything given that the details are very similar, I think you're just seeing differences in the way one person did it versus the way another did. The positions, background details, even the markings on the cargo are the same, just mirrored and slightly altered by the engraver as you noted.

It would be sort of interesting to line up all the various engravings of the same scenes in one place. (Not very useful, but sort of interesting.)

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Yep they are identical with the details...

BTW note the ship's flag of the 1742 Blackbeard picture and compare it with 1736 one and you will notice that in the later reprint there seems to be just a enormous skull on the bowsprit while in the early work there is actually a flag. That looks silly...

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BTW note the ship's flag of the 1742 Blackbeard picture and compare it with 1736 one and you will notice that in the later reprint there seems to be just a enormous skull on the bowsprit while in the early work there is actually a flag. That looks silly...

Ha ha ha! That's Blackbeard's Patagonian Giant skull, used to strike fear in the hearts of his targets.

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A neat picture from 1708 " Ships in the Thames Estuary near Sheerness"

We can see a lot of nice ships there and sailors as well and the variety of different jolly boats is interesting

I wonder that why, in all paintings of ships, are the ships firing their guns for salute.... well probably some style detail of the late baroque naval art.....

While I would like to analyze the men's hats in this picture the picture is too scratchy for any proper hat analyzing but froms of brim hats can be seen quote clearly

And I cannot help to wonder what it is with those white uniformly costumes

siftingthepast_ships-in-the-thames-estua

This is nice as well thought a little later than Gaop

http://siftingthepast.com/2012/05/21/a-ships-boat-scott/

Same here an early Hogarth's work

http://siftingthepast.com/2012/12/26/a-midnight-modern-conversation-william-hogarth-1732/

Edited by Swashbuckler 1700

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I continue with some pictures from National Maritime museum gallery.

East India Company captain circa 1690

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Vice-Admiral Sir Thomas Teddeman, c. 1620-68 (He looks just like Henry Morgan in old prints...)

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Map of One well known island 1685

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The 'Peregrine' and Other Royal Yachts off Greenwich, circa 1710

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A 1682 map of some part of the Caribbean with two buccaneer figures (an a pet monkey). The figures are posted earlier in this tread

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Edited by Swashbuckler 1700

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I continue with some pictures from National Maritime museum gallery.

Map of One well known island 1685

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Very nice!

If I were the sort who believed my character needed a fictional ship, I think I would name her the Goat Quarters. (But I don't.)

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P-Trampon-xx-Captain-Robert-Knox-of-the-

Captain Robert Knox of the East India Company

Interesting figure of an East India company merchant circa 1719. A gentleman nothing really special the coat is detailed and he even has a small tricorne under his arm. So accurate with the little details.

http://www.ajspeelman.co.uk/details.php?sid=156&p=1

And why I quote that painting well a part of the description tells it all:

"Although we cannot be certain who is represented, the figure bears some striking resemblance to a painting in the National Maritime Museum (1711, by P. Trampon), of Robert Knox (1641 – 1720), sea-captain, merchant and writer (his autobiographical writings lending inspiration to Daniel Defoe’s ‘Robinson Crusoe’, published in 1719).

And other period chinese clay figures of East India Merchants:

This is from 1716

http://www.npg.org.uk/collections/search/portraitLarge/mw01401/Joseph-Collet?LinkID=mp00969&role=sit&rNo=0

And this seems to be one period one too togth the site claims it to be from 19th century at least it maker's name is same than the earlier work

http://www.christies.com/lotfinder/sculptures-statues-figures/a-rare-china-trade-figure-of-a-5400959-details.aspx

And the something else

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Modern pictures but they represent late XVII (17th) century French sailors

The first one (the term uniform seems to be misleading in this case)

http://collections.rmg.co.uk/collections/objects/128409.html

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http://collections.rmg.co.uk/collections/objects/128410.html

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http://www.cmhg.gc.ca/cmh/image-133-eng.asp?page_id=144

v1_x1_s02_ss01_01.jpg

While the sailor in French navy had no real uniforms the was something like uniform in the French navy as early as 1660s at least if we believe this article wich has quite reliable sounding cource http://www.kronoskaf.com/syw/index.php?title=French_Navy_Officers

From French to English

Finally a accurate online picture of this sailor from 1770s, Yes later than Gaop but this picture has been used, for example when trying to identify styles that might be similar to the mystical piece of leather headgear of the admiralty slop clothes of 1706-1725. And it is always a pleasure to eye to see tall ships.

http://collections.rmg.co.uk/collections/objects/128431.html

large.jpg

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A Dutch caricature of the battle of Cap de la Hogue circa 1692

Figures from left to right. A Dutch seaman, a surrendered French admiral, An English naval officer, a surrendered French naval officer.
Scanned from an history book but this should be a public domain image.
gallery_20630_536_537519.jpg
Edited by Swashbuckler 1700

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I'll just throw in my two bits of pictures that I've discovered that I've not yet come across in this here thread.

Portrait of the infamous Corsaire Jean Bart in his waining years, perhaps wearing a similar garment to the now equally infamous 'Leather Capps faced with Red Cotton, and lined with Black Linnen'

http://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/9/94/Jean_Bart_mg_9487.jpg

This portrait is supposedly of the infamous Flibustier Laurens De Graaf, presented in the ideal image of a pirate, dashing figure, fine clothes, plumed hat and a slight, rakish smirk on his face.

http://henry-morgan.ru/eng/graff.jpg

Here's one of a French matelot, dressed in typical attire, including red cap and sash. Also, just to stoke the fire of the horizontal stripes debate, note his voluminous breeches.

http://digitalgallery.nypl.org/nypldigital/dgkeysearchdetail.cfm?trg=1&strucID=585702&imageID=1235621&total=82&num=20&parent_id=585389&s=&notword=&d=&c=&f=&k=1&sScope=&sLevel=&sLabel=&lword=&lfield=&sort=&imgs=20&pos=29&snum=&e=r

Not sure if this is period, however the style represented is, and looks rather like swashbuckler's recent posts.

A second matelot, this time in rather different attire, with a curious jacket and some 'open knee'd breeches', which makes me wonder whether he is part of a boat's crew or something like that: http://digitalgallery.nypl.org/nypldigital/dgkeysearchdetail.cfm?trg=1&strucID=585717&imageID=1235636&total=82&num=40&parent_id=585389&s=&notword=&d=&c=&f=&k=1&sScope=&sLevel=&sLabel=&lword=&lfield=&sort=&imgs=20&pos=44&snum=&e=w

Also, from the same site, a French 'Marine Royal' http://digitalgallery.nypl.org/nypldigital/dgkeysearchdetail.cfm?trg=1&strucID=585703&imageID=1235622&total=82&num=20&parent_id=585389&s=&notword=&d=&c=&f=&k=1&sScope=&sLevel=&sLabel=&lword=&lfield=&sort=&imgs=20&pos=30&snum=&e=w

And a 'Capitaine de Vaisseau'

http://digitalgallery.nypl.org/nypldigital/dgkeysearchdetail.cfm?trg=1&strucID=585699&imageID=1235618&total=82&num=20&parent_id=585389&s=&notword=&d=&c=&f=&k=1&sScope=&sLevel=&sLabel=&lword=&lfield=&sort=&imgs=20&pos=26&snum=&e=w

Edited by Zaknesbitt

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I would be carefull about the images from the "The Vinkhuijzen collection of military uniforms" (the ones linked from the digital galleries at New York) in terms of saying they are period images. The book itself is from 1910 and all the illustrations appear to be done by the same artist (just can't find a name for the artist). They are not period images (which made me sad when I figured that out).

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Ahh, thanks for your research, I couldn't find the date on it, which is why I said I wasn't sure it was period.

Thanks for clearing that up :)

Still some good representations.

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I'll just throw in my two bits of pictures that I've discovered that I've not yet come across in this here thread.

Portrait of the infamous Corsaire Jean Bart in his waining years, perhaps wearing a similar garment to the now equally infamous 'Leather Capps faced with Red Cotton, and lined with Black Linnen'

http://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/9/94/Jean_Bart_mg_9487.jpg

Good pictures. Thought that seems to be a form of cloth cap with black fur covering. I have found many pictures of similar hats http://pyracy.com/index.php?/topic/18705-fur-hats/

And well those uniforms are not period images but they have still quite accurate look.

Well and some images more

Capt. Edward Rigby of Leyton in Lanci-shire in a likely period circa 1702 print. At least there is a date 1702 at the print

http://collections.rmg.co.uk/collections/objects/127437.html

Monsieur Le Comte de Tourville Vice-Amiral et Marechal de France. The same man who is the surrendered French admiral in that earlier Dutch print. circa 1696

http://collections.rmg.co.uk/collections/objects/106823.html

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