Swashbuckler 1700

Some interesting pictures.

238 posts in this topic

I highly doubt that the author was trying to infer that Captain James Cook of the Endeavour time traveled to meet Alexander Selkirk, odds are t'is a very simple spelling/typo mistake... as ye both are forgetting about Edward Cooke who was on the Dutchess and wrote his own account of the Rogers' expedition to the south seas.

Surely you recognize my sense of humor by now...

It is most likely the sort of mistake you suggest, although Cooke's account does not appear in either of the first two volumes. (Dampier's does, with the appropriate references to Selkirk.) It brings the accuracy of the images in doubt in my mind because it is clearly labeled and in the section on James Cook. All the other images elsewhere in these volumes appear to match their material.

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Sorry Mission old chap, Captain Edward Cooke's account of his circumnavigation with Woodes Rogers is the first account printed in vol. 2, pages 1-90. The Selkirk illustration is on p. 25 of that volume, in the section on Edward Cooke.

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Stede Bonnet's Death

made 1725 for Dutch edition of GHoP

Bonnet+hanging.jpg

same book's title bage

http://jcb.lunaimagi...~2&mi=26&trs=69

Pic from Buccaneers of America from 1740s edition

http://jcb.lunaimagi...2~2&mi=3&trs=41

same here

http://jcb.lunaimagi...~2&mi=29&trs=41

and also this from same time

http://jcb.lunaimagi...~2&mi=30&trs=41

Morgan from same work

http://jcb.lunaimagi...~2&mi=14&trs=41

Title bage of BoA 1744

http://jcb.lunaimagi...~2&mi=16&trs=41

Morgan from 1736 edtition of GHoP

http://jcb.lunaimagi...~2&mi=22&trs=41

Edited by Swashbuckler 1700

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Stede Bonnet's Death

made 1725 for Dutch edition of GHoP

...

http://jcb.lunaimagi...~2&mi=26&trs=69

Look at that flag! It's more fanciful than the ones most reenactors have come up with. (And that's saying something.)

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Sorry Mission old chap, Captain Edward Cooke's account of his circumnavigation with Woodes Rogers is the first account printed in vol. 2, pages 1-90. The Selkirk illustration is on p. 25 of that volume, in the section on Edward Cooke.

Yep, you and Sterling I right. I stand corrected on that. I must have looked at that book (over a really slow connection) five times, too.

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Perhaps people in Gaop had better imagination. I like that flag very much.

Picture sharing time :lol:

Some can be familiar with these but...

General_History_of_the_Pyrates_-_Blackbeard_the_Pirate_(1725).jpg

Blackbeard circa 1725 in GHoP, apparently used in some later editions as well.

General_History_of_the_Pyrates_-_Blackbeard_the_Pirate_(1724).jpg

same man from same book but from 1724 note what the silly combination fur cap and palm trees make. perhaps that was the reason why hat was changed...

Blackbeard_the_Pirate_from_Charles_Johnson%27s_A_General_History_of_the_Pyrates_1726.jpg

same guy from same book from later 1724 edtition or/ and from one 1726 edition (sources differ but it is certainly from mid 1720s.)

2002.jpg

Bart Roberts from 1724 edition or one of the later mid 1720s editions. see this is colored version and note flags.

http://jcb.lunaimagi.../what/Artifacts, industry, and human activities/Pirates/where/[Amsterdam];sort:Normalized_date%2CCreators%2CPublisher%2CTitle;lc:JCB~1~1,JCBBOOKS~1~1,JCBMAPS~1~1,JCBMAPS~2~2&mi=12&trs=22

In this pic native American man is shot by European soldiers or buccaneers. It is from circa 1700 or before that. Like many can understand european view of indians was not too accurate since they just look like naked Europeans.

Edited by Swashbuckler 1700

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Critisims is welcome but if it is only like " picture makers did not known anything and make bad pics" let it be ;) . Please I have heard that too many times....

We must accept that there has never been or never will be 100% accurate images :unsure: .

But in any case pictorial evidence cannot be dissmised 100% but we should always have critisim to those pics (I am not that naive) but when we compare them with other sources like writings and pictures made by different artists we can get really good information out of them.... ;)

Sorry if I was rude to someone.....

Now is good time to say this

sorry for funny writing errors but I have written my posts casually and English is not my mother language anyway. Some are funny though like "fur cat" and I was supposed to say "fur cap" ^_^

Edited by Swashbuckler 1700

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Buccaneers+1682.jpg

I have posted this before but not in this tread. 1680s buccaneers

1700spanish.jpg

Spaniards in circa 1700s. not pirates or sailors but intersting period pic...

WOPT1003,-Buccaneer-Ships,-.jpg

18th century picc of bucaneer ships

Circa 1700, Illustration showing how to use a Cross Staff http://www.gettyimag...-photo/51239441

1678_1.jpg

Latter 17th century frenchman. He has nice pockets... and his reminds of this

from sid Meir's pirates :P (2004 version) http://farm3.static.flickr.com/2700/4543262587_bb1e881b4a.jpg

Edited by Swashbuckler 1700

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Late 17th century party in playing card

MarlboroughPlayingCard.jpg

Mid 18th century admiral

large.jpg

Admiral 1670s

large.jpg

Portrait of Michiel Adriaenszoon de Ruyter, 1607–1676, Lieutenant-Admiral-General of the United Provinces

Bol%2C_Michiel_de_Ruyter.jpg

a little bit out of Gaop piracy but there is lovely view of English seamen on the right. Oh and it is from 1755

http://jcb.lunaimagi...2~2&mi=2&trs=47

Men prepare and salt turtles for provisions made in 1706 (may well present an earlier time)

http://jcb.lunaimagi...~2&mi=14&trs=47

Ship wreck in 1706

http://jcb.lunaimagi...~2~2&mi=1&trs=6

Sea lion hunt

made in 1706 ( may well present an earlier time)

http://jcb.lunaimagi...~2~2&mi=3&trs=6

cartagena map. From 1588

http://jcb.lunaimagi...~2&mi=0&trs=460

Buccaneers ("made" in 1813 but it seems to have origins from earlier time)

http://jcb.lunaimagi...~2~2&mi=0&trs=1

Capt. Bartholomew Roberts From Johnson's book (1736 edition) Note juicy details like bones and skull on the ground or one of Roberts pirates who Btw has nice little brim hat.

http://jcb.lunaimaging.com/luna/servlet/detail/JCB~1~1~1786~2720005:Capt--Bartholomew-Roberts-?sort=IMAGE_DATE%2Csubject_groups&qvq=q:%3D%22One%2Bof%2Bthe%2Bmost%2Bnotorious%2Bpirates%2Bof%2Bhis%2Bday%2C%2BRoberts%2C%2Bknown%2Bas%2BBlack%2BBart%2C%2Bpracticed%2Bpiracy%2Boff%2Bof%2Bthe%2Bcoast%2Bof%2BBrazil%2Band%2Bin%2Bthe%2BCaribbean%2Bwhere%2Bhe%2Bwas%2Bsaid%2Bto%2Bhave%2Bcaptured%2Bover%2Ba%2Bhundred%2Bships.%2BThis%2Bwork%2Bis%2Boften%2Battributed%2Bto%2BDefoe%2Bbased%2Bon%2Btextual%2Brelationship%2Bto%2Bworks%2Bof%2BDefoe's%2Bproven%2Bauthorship%2Btogether%2Bwith%2Bsupporting%2Bexternal%2Bevidence.%2BIt%2Balso%2Bhas%2Balso%2Bbeen%2Battributed%2Bto%2BCharles%2BJohnson.%22;sort:IMAGE_DATE%2Csubject_groups;lc:JCB~1~1&mi=0&trs=1

Port in Cuba. Made in 1704

http://jcb.lunaimagi...1~1&mi=1&trs=70

Buccaneer assault mace around 1700 but it presents an earlier time

Edited by Swashbuckler 1700

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Men prepare and salt turtles for provisions made in 1706 (may well present an earlier time)

http://jcb.lunaimagi...~2&mi=14&trs=47

Ship wreck in 1706

http://jcb.lunaimagi...~2~2&mi=1&trs=6

Sea lion hunt

made in 1706 ( may well present an earlier time)

http://jcb.lunaimagi...~2~2&mi=3&trs=6

Those are neat, and I was excited to find a pictures of the preparation of sea turtles, but while searching for the book they're from I realized that they're actually drawn to represent voyages that occurred in the 1500s. So they're not really GAoP, even if they were drawn during that time. Then again, I don't recall seeing any other images of turtle preparation thus far, so they're better than nothing. The sea turtle image appears (as best I can tell) to be in preparation of a voyage taken by Antonio de Herrera y Tordesillas. I think.

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Men prepare and salt turtles for provisions made in 1706 (may well present an earlier time)

http://jcb.lunaimagi...~2&mi=14&trs=47

Ship wreck in 1706

http://jcb.lunaimagi...~2~2&mi=1&trs=6

Sea lion hunt

made in 1706 ( may well present an earlier time)

http://jcb.lunaimagi...~2~2&mi=3&trs=6

Those are neat, and I was excited to find a pictures of the preparation of sea turtles, but while searching for the book they're from I realized that they're actually drawn to represent voyages that occurred in the 1500s. So they're not really GAoP, even if they were drawn during that time. Then again, I don't recall seeing any other images of turtle preparation thus far, so they're better than nothing. The sea turtle image appears (as best I can tell) to be in preparation of a voyage taken by Antonio de Herrera y Tordesillas. I think.

this is from 1722 ;)

http://jcb.lunaimaging.com/luna/servlet/detail/JCB~1~1~1067~1230017:Tortüe-qui-veut-pondre,-Maniere-de-?sort=Normalized_date%2CCreators%2CPublisher%2CTitle&qvq=q:turtle;sort:Normalized_date%2CCreators%2CP

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Excellent! I would do a write up on sailors using turtles as food, although I don't know if I have enough information on it and it isn't directly related to medicine. Still, it would make a nice one or two page article for a month when I have a Surgeon's Journal to write and not just the monthly medical article. Thanks for the link.

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Picture sharing time

snuffing in 1690s

45-Image50.jpg

It would have been better not to carry all instruments at the same time

larmessin_musician.jpg

European man doing nasty things in late 17th C possibly buccaneer

http://jcb.lunaimaging.com/luna/servlet/detail/JCB~1~1~3745~5860005:Wrede-strasse-van-een-Planter-aan-z?sort=Normalized_date%2CCreators%2CPublisher%2CTitle&qvq=w4s:/what/Artifacts, industry, and human activities/Pirates/where/[Amsterdam];sort:Normalized_date%2CCreators%2CPublisher%2CTitle;lc:JCB~1~1,JCBBOOKS~1~1,JCBMAPS~1~1,JCBMAPS~2~2&mi=9&trs=22

Odd picture :wacko:

http://jcb.lunaimaging.com/luna/servlet/detail/JCB~1~1~4617~7290002:-Man-attacks-sea-monster-?sort=Normalized_date%2CCreators%2CPublisher%2CTitle&qvq=w4s:/when/1651-1700;q:sea;sort:Normalized_date%2CCreators%2CPublisher%2CTitle;lc:JCB~1~1,JCBBOOKS~1~1,JCBMAPS~1~1,JCBMAPS~2~2&mi=0&trs=33

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I'll bet that's a secondhand drawing of a manatee. You want to see some weird creatures, do a search for Ambroise Paré in one of those image databases.

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indeed Mission ;)

picture sharing may continue

not from gaop but from 1760s. see sailors on the left)

http://jcb.lunaimagi...~2~2&mi=0&trs=8

From BoA and from 1741 edtition

http://jcb.lunaimagi...&mi=104&trs=189

Havana/ Habana in 1704

http://jcb.lunaimagi...&mi=125&trs=189

Mexican plantasion( whatever) in cicra 1725

http://jcb.lunaimagi...~2&mi=19&trs=32

Henry Morgan at Porto Bello

http://jcb.lunaimagi...2~2&mi=6&trs=34

Admiral Hosier's Ghost. from 1740

http://jcb.lunaimagi...~2&mi=33&trs=34

the figures are as L-R a Dutch sailor, French sailor, Portuguese sailor, and English sailor. made in 1701

AN00353778_001_l.jpg

Gaop pic of Dutch sailors. From 1695

31651cartouche.jpg

From 1725 Dutch edition of Ghop. Capt. Antis' crew playing trial

opitz2.JPG

Hogart's cartoon of sea life from 1747 (nice hanging pirates/ smugglers there)

p-8772_crop_grey.jpg

Sirca 1702 picture of privateer Jean Bart. there is nice French grenadier sailor there also... and he reminds of this http://i38.photobucket.com/albums/e136/DLasseter/Reenactment/marin-b.jpg

jean_bart_1a-210.jpg

Late 17th century illustration of breech-loading swivel guns

Mallet_paterero-210.jpg

Late 17th century illustration of firepots

Firepots-210.jpg

Firepots_crop-210.jpg

Edited by Swashbuckler 1700

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Does anyone else see similarities between circa 1725 picture of Capt. Martel and picture of "English admiral at sea" from 1703. E.g both have hat backwards....

gallery_20630_550_130844.jpg

AN00476504_001_l.jpg

This is also has bit similar. I wonder that it maybe that illustrator used naval officer as role models. His hat also can be backwards but it is not so clear.

gallery_20630_550_153844.jpg

Edited by Swashbuckler 1700

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Late 17th century illustration of firepots

Firepots-210.jpg

Firepots_crop-210.jpg

I used these pictures when I was researching the Firepots I made. They provided the missing information on how the thing was thrown and what held the wooden top in place.

firepot.jpg

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Does anyone else see similarities between circa 1725 picture of Capt. Martel and picture of "English admiral at sea" from 1703. E.g both have hat backwards....

gallery_20630_550_130844.jpg

AN00476504_001_l.jpg

This is also has dit similar. I wonder that it maybe that illustrator used naval officer as role models. His hat also can be backwards but it is so clear.

gallery_20630_550_153844.jpg

I'd always assumed that these were wearing Bicorne hats. The "English admiral at sea" especially as he even has the smaller brim at the front and the larger brim at the back that was specifically the way that the English made Bicorne hats.

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But far far too early to be bicorns... (over to you Mr Grymm).

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But far far too early to be bicorns... (over to you Mr Grymm).

Indeed there is no way that they could be bicorns since bicorns came around 1770s or 1790s and they were not used in 1703 or 1725. ;) They must be and they look like tricorns :huh:

I look and look so hard that my eyeballs are about to break down but I don't see anything more that tricorns used backwards . See the tip on backside in admiral's hat... Grymm please help us.....

See the Hogart earlier in this tead and hats look really similar.

Admiral's and pirates's hat are just little more backwards that this what is clear tricorn

BartholomewRoberts.jpg

Also these 1736 pic has quite similar hats

http://jcb.lunaimagi...~2~2&mi=2&trs=5

Admiral's hat seems to be early tricorn like this but turhed backwards see the point has bigger brim than back and when you turn it backwards the bigger side is on the back.

27_1683.jpg

Edited by Swashbuckler 1700

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Would they maybe what was refered to as a cocked hat then? Or are we saying that is another word for Tricorns?

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Yup, cocked hat is indeed just another word for tricorn.

It's an odd illusion. Like Swashbuckler, I look and I look at those hats and I just can't see anything apart from a tricorn 'backwards'. Others see bicorns, but I can't even when I try, and I suspect that it's partly because I am conditioned against the possibilty that they are bicorns this early.

In fairness, the chances that they actually are bicorns are miniscule to non-existent, so in this case my pre-conditioning is not unreasonable, but it makes one think about what one sees in other pictures...

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Well speaking for myself, what I was seeing was a basic wide brimmed circular hat pinned up at the front and back.

Maybe the artist was just rubbish at perspective and they are tricorns ;)

The hat shown in this picture above looks to me a lot like the one that was featured in the Captain Kidd exhibit:

27_1683.jpg

_52739039_82a.jpg

Edited by PoD

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Well speaking for myself, what I was seeing was a basic wide brimmed circular hat pinned up at the front and back.

Yeah, the Martel illustration could be exactly that - though it's a bit late for that to be fashionable I think.

The English Admiral illustration doesn't look like anything to me except a 'backwards' tricorn. I just can't see anything else.

The Evans picture also looks like a backwards tricorn, but we can argue about that one over a pint.

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There is a paragraph in the 1729 edition of the spectator that seemed to say that the hats the navy were using were long out of date:

"We hear from good authority, that it is the intention of the Admiralty to revise the present regulation for the uniform of the Royal Navy, with the view of reducing the costly expenditure of the junior officers. It is said that epaulettes are to be altogether abolished, and it is a question whether the antiquated cocked-hat will be retained for use on board ship.— United Service Gazette. . "

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