Daniel

La Buse the longest serving Golden Age pirate captain?

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I'm reading Colin Woodard's Republic of Pirates (good stuff, that) and came to thinking: Olivier La Buse* was cruising in 1716 with Hornigold, and was later with John Taylor at the capture of the Nossa Senhora do Cabo in 1721. That's a piratical career of five years as captain. Bartholomew Roberts, often cited as one of the longest serving Golden Age captains, lasted less than half that long.

Of course, the fact that La Buse was a captain in 1716 and was one in 1721 doesn't mean he spent the whole intervening time as a captain; he could have been deposed and re-elected several times. Foxe mentioned in another thread that La Buse at one point replaced Jasper Seagar as captain on the ship that ws formerly England's, which raises the possibility that La Buse was serving under Seagar in a post other than captain. However, every other reference I've read to La Buse: as captain of the Postillion with Hornigold and Bellamy in 1716, a captain with Cocklyn and Davis on the African coast in 1719, commanding the second ship of England's two ship group in 1720 in the battle with the Cassandra; it seems La Buse was usually, if not always, a captain. The extremely poorly sourced Wikipedia article on La Buse claims that he was hanged in 1730; if that were true, his pirate career could have lasted as long as 14 years.

So was La Buse truly the most durable pirate captain of his age? Are there any other conteders for the honor? If so, it is all the more amazing that he is so little known and so poorly documented.

*Or Le Buze or La Bouche or Levasseur or whatever.

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We can be fairly certain that La Buse was not in the position of captain for the whole of the 1716-1721 period. In the first instance, as you note, he at some point replaced Seagar as captain, suggesting that he wasn't captain at that time. The whole bit between when Snelgrave was with Cocklyn, Davis and La Buse up until the battle with the Cassandra is a little sketchy, but from the evidence of Richard Moore, a forced surgeon, it seems that two pirate ships commanded by Cocklyn and England, but also containing La Buse, Seagar and Taylor, rounded the Cape of Good Hope. The logical progression is that at some point on the West coast of Africa La Buse and his men went aboard Cocklyn's ship. After rounding the Cape Cocklyn Died and was replaced by Taylor, and England was made commodore and replaced as captain by Seagar. Eventually La Buse replaced Seagar.

Earlier than that, Snelgrave tells us that Cocklyn and La Buse were both serving under Moody. Cocklyn with 25 men was forced into the Rising Sun, but the rest of the men, 'repenting of that action', forced Moody and twelve others into 'an open boat', and 'chose one Le Bouse a Frenchman for their Commander'.

And later, John Taylor's captive, Jacob du Bucquoy, recounts:

"Wearied, La Bouze and several of his officers plotted in the night of 17 and 18 August 1722 to abandon Taylor and make for the West Indies. The other pirates of the Defence [La Bouze's ship], however, who did not hold the same opinion, fired a cannon and displayed the black flag, a signal of distress. The council met and, after an enquiry, degraded La Bouze who was, along with his accomplices, condemned to be flogged at the foot of the mainmast, and all that they possessed to be confiscated into the common stock."

Not long after this, the pirates divided between those who wanted to carry on their piracy in the Indian Ocean and those who wanted to try and get a pardon in the West Indies. Taylor led the West Indies party away (and successfully obtained a pardon from the Spanish at Porto Bello), and La Buse was chosen to take command of the Indian Ocean party.

Thus, between 1716 and 1722 La Buse held command on at least four seperate occasions. I don't know how long La Bouse and his company carried on their piracy, but he had retired well before he was captured and hanged in 1730.

Even so, he was probably elected to command more times than any other pirate of the age, and a recorded career of 7 years or so certainly makes him one of the longest serving pirates.

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Thanks, Foxe. I am going to try to put together a timeline of La Buse's known activities, using Woodard, Johnson, and other sources; anyhting you can add to it after I put it up will be welcome.

A unique thing about La Buse: he never seems to sail alone. Every mention I find of him has him sailing a ship in consort with at least one other pirate ship. Most of the famous captains spent at least some time alone, but the only time I can find where La Buse may have been alone was a short time in June or July 1716 when Hornigold and possibly Bellamy went to Nassau, leaving La Buse alone on French Hispaniola. And La Buse seems hardly to have budged from the spot, because Bellamy and Hornigold met him there again a month or two later to resume their ravages.

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OK, here's my preliminary timeline of La Buse's pirate career, based largely off four sources: Colin Woodard's Republic of Pirates, Stephens' Captured by Pirates, Johnson's General History as reproduced in the Eastern North Carolina Digital Library, and hints from Foxe's posts. I hope to fill in the gaps with edits over the next few months.

Most of the details are from 1716 during La Buse's cruise on the Postillion, alongside Bellamy and Hornigold. There are three major gaps: nothing whatsoever about La Buse's life before joining Hornigold, very little about his activities between separating from Bellamy in the Caribbean in January 1717 and replacing Moody off Africa in early 1719 (?), and essentially nothing after La Buse's parting company with Taylor in 1722 until his execution in 1730.

A goodly part of the middle gap could be filled in if we knew more about Moody's movements before La Buse replaced him. My understanding is that this is Christopher Moody, who was a different person from William Moody. Johnson's second volume has a letter from a reader mentioning a Moody who threatened Charleston in 1718, but I think that was William, not Christopher, because the writer mentions him taking the Act of Grace, and Woodard refers to William Moody taking the Act of Grace. Aside from that, I cannot find anything about Christopher Moody's career before 1719.

Incidentally, Snelgrave thought that Christopher Moody died when his men set him off on a boat, which was obviously a mistake given that a very much alive C. Moody was hanged with others of Roberts' men at Cape Coast Castle in 1722. Since Roberts' predecessor Howell Davis shows up in the Sierra Leone river in April 1719 at the same time that La Buse does, it would appear very likely that Davis rescued Moody and Moody was aboard Davis's ship all along, unknown to Snelgrave, and perhaps unknown to La Buse.

TIMELINE OF LA BUSE'S ACTIVITIES

April 1716: Joins with Hornigold and Bellamy off Cuba in the sloop Postillion. Woodard, 135.

April/May, 1716: La Buse and Hornigold capture an English ship, followed by two Spanish brigantines near the Yucatan channel. Woodard, p. 135.

May 1716: La Buse, Hornigold and Bellamy careen on Isla de los Pinos. Woodard, 135.

End of May, 1716: La Buse stays on Hispaniola while Hornigold and possibly Bellamy proceed to Nasau.

June 1716: La Buse and possibly Bellamy capture English ships on the south coast of Cuba. Woodard, 144.

Late June/early July, 1716: Belllamy and Hornigold rejoin La Buse on Hispaniola. Woodard, 144.

August, 1716: Bellamy and La Buse expel Hornigold from Hispaniola. Woodard, 145.

September, 1716: La Buse and Bellamy battle a French frigate between Puerto Rico and St. Thomas. Woodard, 146.

October-November, 1716: La Buse and Bellamy prowl the Virgin Islands. Woodard, 146.

November 9, 1716: La Buse and Bellamy capture the Bonetta sloop between St. Thomas and St. Croix. La Buse flies a flag "with a death's head and bones across" on the Postillion's mast. Woodard, 147.

November, 1716: La Buse and Bellmay careen on St. Croix. Woodard, 148.

November/December, 1716: La Buse and Bellamy capture the Sultana and another ship belonging to Captain Tosor, southwest of Saba. Woodard, 149.

December 19, 1716: La Buse and Bellamy capture the British ship St. Michael, 27 miles from La Blanquilla. Woodard, 151.

January, 1717: La Buse parts company with Bellamy and Paulsgrave Williams at La Blanquilla. Woodard, 151.

May/June, 1717: La Buse appears in Nassau with a new 250-ton, 20-gun vessel and recruits new pirates. Woodard, 194.

November, 1717: La Buse evades the Seaford off St. Thomas, reported in a ship of 26 guns and 250 men flying a white ensign with a figure of a dead man. Woodard, 221.

Sept. 1717-May 1718: La Buse reported at Nassau, but was afterward "cast away." Johnson, 35.

June 12, 1718: The Scarborough attacks La Buse at anchor near La Blanquilla. La Buse abandons his ship and escapes in a prize sloop. Woodard, 321.

Before April 1, 1719: La Buse, aboard a brigantine, is elected captain to replace the marooned Captain Moody. Stephens, p. 101. He then joins forces with Howell Davis, and together they go to Sierra Leone, where they join with Cocklyn. Johnson, 184-85.

After April 1, 1719: La Buse's brigantine and Cocklyn's ship attack and capture several ships in the mouth of the Sierra Leone river. Stephens, 119-20. La Buse and his crew abandon their brigantine in the Sierra Leone river and take over a prize ship (the Defence?)taken with Thomas Cocklyn and Howell Davis. Stephens, p. 118. Paulsgrave Williams has become La Buse's quartermaster. Stephens, 123-24. After departing Sierra Leone, La Buse separates from Cocklyn and Davis. Johnson, 186.

After June 27, 1719: La Buse encounters England near Whydah harbor. Johnson, 117.

August 17, 1720: La Buse and England fight Jame MacRae's Cassandra off Anjouan. Johnson, 119, Rediker, 183.

1720: La Buse replaces Jasper Seagar as a captain. Foxe.

April, 1721?: Taylor and La Buse capture the Nossa Senhora do Cabo. Botting?

August 18, 1722: La Buse attempts to abandon Taylor, but is caught and flogged. Bucquoy, per Foxe.

After August 18, 1722: La Buse and Taylor part company, with La Buse remaining in the Indian Ocean. Bucquoy, per Foxe.

1730: La Buse hanged on Reunion island. Woodard, 321.

Edited by Daniel

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Good stuff as usual Daniel :P

I can add a couple of bits.

A goodly part of the middle gap could be filled in if we knew more about Moody's movements before La Buse replaced him. My understanding is that this is Christopher Moody, who was a different person from William Moody. Johnson's second volume has a letter from a reader mentioning a Moody who threatened Charleston in 1718, but I think that was William, not Christopher, because the writer mentions him taking the Act of Grace, and Woodard refers to William Moody taking the Act of Grace. Aside from that, I cannot find anything about Christopher Moody's career before 1719.

Incidentally, Snelgrave thought that Christopher Moody died when his men set him off on a boat, which was obviously a mistake given that a very much alive C. Moody was hanged with others of Roberts' men at Cape Coast Castle in 1722. Since Roberts' predecessor Howell Davis shows up in the Sierra Leone river in April 1719 at the same time that La Buse does, it would appear very likely that Davis rescued Moody and Moody was aboard Davis's ship all along, unknown to Snelgrave, and perhaps unknown to La Buse.

The commander of the Rising Sun was William Moody, not Christopher. On August 23 1720, William Bournal was tried in Bermuda. Bournal was charged that he had "in the Month of June in the year 1718 at the Bay of Honduras and within the Jurisdiction of the Adm.lty of Great Britain, and at divers other times and places after, join wth or enter yourself on board a ship called the Rising Sun, whereof one William Moody a noted Pirate was Commander". Bournal cruised with Moody "in and about the West Indies for the space of two Months", before leaving his crew to join "one Joseph Thompson another Noted Pirate" on a sloop called the Eagle. (CO 37/10, f. 170)

Bournal, most inconsiderately, pleaded guilty, so there was no trial and no witnesses called. Thus, the only information comes from the indictments quoted above. Christopher Moody, to my knowledge, never had independent command.

June 12, 1718: The Scarborough attacks La Buse at anchor near La Blanquilla. La Buse abandons his ship and escapes in a prize sloop. Woodard, 321.

The sloop was called Boneta, of Nevis, which had been captured by La Buse the previous day, June 11. (Various sources, for example: ADM 1/1879, 'At an Admiralty Court', St. Christophers, 5/7/1718, testimonies of James Moor and Thomas Hall.)

Before April 1, 1719: La Buse, aboard a brigantine, is elected captain to replace the marooned Captain Moody. Stephens, p. 101. He then joins forces with Howell Davis, and together they go to Sierra Leone, where they join with Cocklyn. Johnson, 184-85.

Snelgrave gives a very similar account of the meeting of La Buse, Davis, and Cocklyn, but says that when La Buse reached Sierra Leone he was alone, and there met up with Cocklyn. Later the same day Davis arrived. (Snelgrave, 198-199). Of the two writers, Snelgrave was much closer to the action.

After April 1, 1719: La Buse's brigantine and Cocklyn's ship attack and capture several ships in the mouth of the Sierra Leone river. Stephens, 119-20. La Buse and his crew abandon their brigantine in the Sierra Leone river and take over a prize ship (the Defence?)taken with Thomas Cocklyn and Howell Davis. Stephens, p. 118. Paulsgrave Williams has become La Buse's quartermaster. Stephens, 123-24. After departing Sierra Leone, La Buse separates from Cocklyn and Davis. Johnson, 186.

According to The Weekly Packet of 12/12/1719 the three pirate ships that came out of the Sierra Lenoe River were the King James, the Speakwell, and the Ormond. A little way down the coast it is reported that the King James parted company from the other two ships, which accords well with Johnson's account, and suggests that the Speakwell and Ormond were commanded by Cocklyn and La Buse. Cocklyn, according to Snelgrave, took command of Snelgrave's ship, which by this time appears to have been renamed Speakwell, meaning that La Buse was then in command of the Ormond, formerly the Sarah. Cocklyn and La Buse were still in consort, according to this paper, when they reached Whydah.

[Edit: that La Buse commanded the Ormond and was in consort with Cocklyn at Whydah is borne out by Richard Moor's deposition (see below)]

The Weekly Journal or Saturday's Post of 26/3/1720 has it that two pirates 'viz. the Merchant, Le Buck Commander, of 40 guns and 180 Men, and the King James, Davis Commander, of 56 Guns and 200 Men... designed to take the Island called the Princess [Principe]; but being discovered, they did not effect it'. This suggests that La Buse and his crew were present when Davis was killed in the attack on Principe, but this doesn't fit at all well with the other evidence about the parting with Davis.

After June 27, 1719: La Buse encounters England near Whydah harbor. Johnson, 117.

According to The Examination of Richard Moor, 31/10/1724, (HCA 1/55, ff. 94-95), Cocklyn and 'Oliver le Boos' captured the Comrade Galley on the Guinea coast on 7/6/1718 [sic: surely he must have meant 1719], and sailed in consort with their prize to Whydah, where they took further ships, and then sailed to the uninhabited island of Corisco. From Corisco, La Buse and the Ormond 'proceeded for the East Indias', where Cocklyn in the Speedwell followed about a month later, leaving the Comrade abandoned at anchor..

However, according to The Examination of John Matthews, 12/10/1722. HCA 1/55, f.20, Cocklyn seems to have transferred himself to the command of the Comrade, leaving John Taylor in command of the Speakwell. At Corisco, La Buse and Cocklyn exchanged ships and La Buse (with Matthews on board) sailed for the East Indies in the Comrade. En route to the East Indies, La Buse captured an English merchant ship called Indian Queen, which he exchanged for the Comrade. Matthews and four others escaped from La Buse at Mayotte, and he made no mention of having met England up to that point, suggesting that Johnson may have been wrong.

August 17, 1720: La Buse and England fight Jame MacRae's Cassandra off Anjouan. Johnson, 119, Rediker, 183.

Back to Richard Moor’s evidence: Taylor and Cocklyn appear to have left Corisco together, apparently on the Speedwell [thus, it was presumably La Buse’s Ormond that was abandoned], and about five days later took the Victory. At Madagascar Cocklyn was joined by ‘two other Pirate ships called the Fancy and the John Gally under the command of Edward England’. Shortly thereafter, Cocklyn died and was succeeded by Taylor.

Captain McCrae’s account of the capture of the Cassandra begins with news of La Buse: ‘We arrived the 25th July at the Island of Johanna in company with the Greenwich. Putting in there to refresh our men we found 14 Pirates that came in their canoe from Mayotta where their ship the Indian Queen, 250 tons, 28 guns and 90 men commanded by Captain Oliver de la Bouche had been bilged and lost. They said they had left their captain and 40 of their men building a new ship in which to proceed to the East Indies…’.

Captain Kirby’s report of the action makes it clear that the two pirate ships who attacked the Cassandra and Greenwich were the Victory and Fancy, ie, the ships commanded by Taylor and England.

The testimony of Richard Lazenby, officer of the Cassandra and captive of the pirates, suggests that Seagar was already in command of the Fancy by the time of the battle. Richard Moor says that Seagar replaced England at around the time of the battle, but isn’t specific as to when. Johnson, relying on McCrae’s information, has England still in command, possibly as a kind of commodore. Either way, La Buse was not in command of any of the pirate ships involved, and there’s no evidence that he was present: less than a month previously he had been stranded at Mayotte without a ship.

1720: La Buse replaces Jasper Seagar as a captain. Foxe.

April, 1721?: Taylor and La Buse capture the Nossa Senhora do Cabo. Botting?

Richard Moor is fairly specific about these events, and says that at the time of the capture of the Cabo the pirate ships were ‘under the command of the sd Taylor and Seagar’. After the capture, the pirates took their prize to St. Mary’s island, ‘and there the sd Seager dyed and ye aforesaid le Boos was made Captain of the Cassandra in his room’. The Cabo was taken on Easter Sunday 1721, so presumably La Buse rose again to command in the early summer.

At what point La Buse rejoined the Cocklyn/England/Taylor/Seagar gang is unclear, but there are a couple of possibilities. England may have picked up La Buse and others of his crew at Johanna: there’s not a great deal of evidence about this part of England’s cruise and his movements are hard to determine. Or, La Buse and his men may have been aboard the John Galley when it arrived at Madagascar in England’s company. The John was burned before the attack on the Cassandra, at which time its crew presumably went aboard the Fancy. Or, just possibly, after the loss of the Indian Queen La Buse and his men may have made their way to St. Mary’s, where they only joined Taylor’s company after the capture of the Cabo. This would leave a large gap in La Buse’s career, but might explain why he was so keen to stay in the Indian Ocean when Taylor wanted to leave.

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The commander of the Rising Sun was William Moody, not Christopher.

Stephens' notes say it was Christopher. Sigh - add that to about thirty other errors I've found in Stephens' notes.

But actually, that's good news: it means that the Moody reported off Charleston in October 1718 by Captain Johnson's correspondent may in fact be La Buse's captain. The Moody at Charleston was reported in a fifty-gun ship. Since William Moody was already in the Rising Sun in June 1718, and kept it until he forced Cocklyn into it somewhere near Africa in early 1719, then he would have had it off Charleston. If the Rising Sun were a fifty-gun ship, that would clinch the identity of the Moody off Charleston as being La Buse's Moody. I don't see anything in Snelgrave about the size of the Rising Sun, though.

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I'm 99% certain that the Moody who appeared off Charleston is somewhere referred to as William, or that his ship is called the Rising Sun. I can look the reference up if necessary, but I don't think there's any doubt.

There is (or has been) a general assumption that 'Captain' Moody was Christopher, but I suspect this is because Christopher Moody's name is familiar from the GHP, whereas one actually has to go to an archive to read the name of William Moody (or, indeed, Samuel or James Moody, who were also Golden Age pirates).

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Rereading Lazenby's account, and comparing it with McCrae's, I now think it quite likely that La Buse joined Taylor and co at Madagascar, after the capture of the Cabo.

At the beginning of McCrae's account it's clear that La Buse was at Mayotte at the time of the engagment with the Cassandra. Lazenby narrative then covers the whole of the time from that engagement up to the capture of the Cabo, but makes no mention of them meeting La Buse at any point.

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Eye thought Taylor was with Le Buse when they plundered the Cabo based on this. >

"Historians believe that cached somewhere in this far-flung archipelago are the plunders of Olivier Le Vasseur, aka La Buse, or the Buzzard, a French pirate who roamed the Indian Ocean during the early 1700s. In 1721, La Buse, along with English pirate John Taylor and their crews, ransacked the Nossa Senhora do Cabo, a Portuguese frigate undergoing repairs near Mauritius, about 1,000 miles south of the Seychelles. The Cabo carried gold, uncut diamonds and church regalia belonging to the retiring viceroy of Goa. At the time, Goa was a Portuguese colony on the west coast of present-day India. La Buse and Taylor made off with the treasure—then valued at more than a million pounds sterling"

Read more: http://www.smithsoni...l#ixzz1rtRvAHMK

Edited by oderlesseye

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That is the generally accepted version, but it's based on the fact that La Buse was later in command of the Cabo. There's no evidence that I know of that he was actually present at the capture, and circumstantial evidence (above) that he wasn't. Even if he was present at the capture, he wasn't in command.

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That is the generally accepted version, but it's based on the fact that La Buse was later in command of the Cabo. There's no evidence that I know of that he was actually present at the capture, and circumstantial evidence (above) that he wasn't. Even if he was present at the capture, he wasn't in command.

By the way

was La buse really one-eyed? desismileys_7025.gif

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Hi

I read your topic and I can provide some clarification on Olivier Le Vasseur "La Buse" or "La Bouche".

Excuse me for my English, I use a robot translator, I am French!

Firstly, are you sure of your sources, Are They historical or are they fictionalized?

On board the Nossa Senhora do Cabo (La vierge du Cap ), there was His Excellency the Count of Ericeira, Portugal's great, late Viceroy and Captain General of East India for his Portuguese majesty,

Starting from "Goa" capital of all states that have Portuguese in East India January 25, 1721.

At the Isle of Bourbon (Reunion) April 6 in the harbor of Saint Denis to make repairs.

In his narrative he says that the April 26, 1721, he was attacked by "the victorious" controlled by "La Bousse" (La Bouche) and by "La Fantaisie" controlled by "Siger" (Seagar).

He also talks about "Taylor" who is quartermaster of pirates.

He also said that there were no diamonds hidden in the ship.

Count left for France on November 15 on the ship "Triton" French Company of the Indies ordered.

Count speaks French perfectly and these facts recounted in the french newspaper "Mercury" in 1722.

http://img4.hostingp...mercure1722.jpg

or

Historical source :

Page 54

http://books.google....epage&q&f=false

Around 1729, La Buse practiced the profession of pilot in the bay of Antongil (Eastern side of Madagascar), it offered services to the ship "la Méduse" of the East India Company, who wanted to enter the harbor. When approached "la Méduse", La Buse imagined forgotten, stowed ships, de facto amnesty. It is not the case. The new Governor Dumas was turning a page of history by putting to death the last great living figure of piracy. It succeeds. Captain D' Hermitte, commander of "la Méduse", saw the pirate La Buse, and remembering that the attacker had repeatedly boarded ships of his company, he captured under the orders of the new Governor of the Isle of Bourbon.

On July 7, 1730, Olivier Levasseur finally knows his fate.

La Buse était condamné à mort à 17h. Voici un extrait du jugement :"Voeu par le Conseil le procès criminel extraordinairement fait et instruit à la requête et diligence du Procureur du Roy, demandeur et accusateur, contre Olivier Levasseur surnommé La Buse, accusé du crime de piraterie […]. Le Conseil l’a condamné et condamne à faire amande honorable devant la principale porte de l’église de cette paroisse, nu en chemise, la corde au col et tenant en sa main une torche ardente du poids de deux livres, pour là, dire et déclarer à haute et intelligible voix que méchamment et témérairement il a fait pendant plusieurs années le métier de forban, dont il se repent et demande pardon à Dieu, au Roy. […] Exécuté à cinq heures du soir le sept juillet mil sept cent trente." Signé Chassin, Dumas , Villarmoy, G. Dumas, de Lanux.

La Buse was sentenced to death at 17h. Here is an excerpt of the judgment: "Vow by the Council on criminal trial is extraordinarily educated and at the request of the Prosecutor and diligence of the King, plaintiff and accuser, against Olivier Levasseur nicknamed La Buse, charged with the crime of piracy [...]. Council He was sentenced and ordered to make honorable amends before the main door of the church of this parish, naked in his shirt, a rope about their necks and holding in his hand a flaming torch weighing two pounds, for there, and declare in a loud voice that he recklessly and maliciously done for many years the trade of pirate, he repents and asks God's forgiveness, the king. [...] Executed at five pm on July 7, one thousand seven hundred and thirty. "Signed Chassin, Dumas, Villarmoy, G. Dumas, Lanux.

The Legend:

When he mounted the scaffold to expiate his crimes pirate Olivier Levasseur," La Buse" , the crowd launched into a cryptogram and exclaimed: "My treasures to who will understand!"

The cryptogram :

http://ybphoto.free....optogramme1.jpg

The legend in video

See later !

Edited by La Buse

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Welcome aboard La Buse, and thankyou for your wonderful information. This is the first evidence I've seen that La Buse was present at the capture of the Cabo

We tend to be very focussed on sources in our own languages, so it's great to hear something from the French side.

Firstly, are you sure of your sources, Are They historical or are they fictionalized?

In answer to this question, yes, all of the sources I have quoted are historical.

William Snelgrave and Jacob du Bucquoy were both captured by pirates and later published accounts of their time on board pirate ships, Snelgrave's account was published in the 1730s, du Bucquoy's was published in 1744. Richard Lazenby was also captured by the pirates and held aboard their ship - he was actually on board at the time of the capture of the Cabo. His account was not published at the time but exists in the East India Company records at the British library and was published in Charles Grey's book Pirates of the Eastern Seas in 1930.

Captain McCrae's account of the capture of the Cassandra was published in The Post Boy, 25 April and 27 April 1721.

The testimonies of Richard Moor and John Matthews were given in London and exist in the High Court of Admiralty depositions book in the National Archives, Kew. The trial of William Bournal is in the Colonial Office papers in the National Archives. They have never been published and were transcribed here by me.

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Does anyone still know was he one eyed or not?

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I do not recall ever having read a reference to him having only one eye, in a period source or a modern one.

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Foxe thank you for your clarification.

I read the whole topic and I translate because the timeline becomes confused with the addition of your annotations.

I try to understand any sort especially with a translation of google approximatve.

The ship "La fantaisie" is "the fancy" of Seagar

"Le Victorieux" is "the victory" of LaBuse.

LaBuse and the Count of Ericeira understand since they both speak French.

So LaBuse is the captain of "Le Victorieux"

You say :

"Richard Moor is fairly specific about these events, and says that at the time of the capture of the Cabo the pirate ships were ‘under the command of the sd Taylor and Seagar" .

What is "sd" ?

"After the capture, the pirates took their prize to St. Mary’s island, ‘and there the sd Seager dyed and ye aforesaid le Boos was made Captain of the Cassandra in his room’"

So there are the victorious, the fancy, the Nossa Senhora do Cabo and Cassandra in St Mary Island ?

Daniel's sources , are they good ?

If you could redo the timeline by adding detailed annotations, that would be great.

I come back when I have understood everything.

La Buse

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I don't know what sd mean but I bet it doesn't mean Secure Digital :P ...... well it could mean "said". so I think it means " said Tailor" meaning Tailor which is already mentioned.

Edited by Swashbuckler 1700

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Foxe thank you for your clarification.

You're welcome. I'll do my best to clarify some more.

The ship "La fantaisie" is "the fancy" of Seagar

"Le Victorieux" is "the victory" of LaBuse.

LaBuse and the Count of Ericeira understand since they both speak French.

So LaBuse is the captain of "Le Victorieux"

Both Richard Moor and Captain McCrae say that after capturing the Cassandra at Johanna the pirates gave their ship, the Fancy, to McCrae. If the Count of Ericeira thought that the pirates ships were called Fantasie and Victorieux that suggests that the pirates renamed the Cassandra as Fancy.

As to who was in command of which ship, Richard Moor, who spent a great deal of time aboard the pirate vessels, is quite clear. He says that Taylor and Seagar commanded the Victory and Seagar commanded the Cassandra/Fancy. He goes on to say that La Buse replaced Seagar when Seagar died at Madagascar, shortly after the capture of the Cabo. If the Count of Ericeira though la Buse was captain then perhaps that shows that la Buse was the one who conducted the negotiations (in French), and therefore gave the impression of being in command.

You say :

"Richard Moor is fairly specific about these events, and says that at the time of the capture of the Cabo the pirate ships were ‘under the command of the sd Taylor and Seagar" .

What is "sd" ?

As Swashbuckler says, it means "said", or previously mentioned.

"After the capture, the pirates took their prize to St. Mary’s island, ‘and there the sd Seager dyed and ye aforesaid le Boos was made Captain of the Cassandra in his room’"

So there are the victorious, the fancy, the Nossa Senhora do Cabo and Cassandra in St Mary Island ?

According to Moor, when they arrived as Madagascar the pirates had the Victory, Cassandra/Fancy, Cabo, and another prize called the Greyhound. Taylor took command of the Cabo, la Buse assumed command of the Cassandra/Fancy, the Greyhound escaped, and they burnt the Victory.

Daniel's sources , are they good ?

Apart from Johnson, they are all modern authors. Woodard's book is well researched, I'm not so convinced about Botting. Johnson's book is a mix of very good and awful.

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Battle of Anjouan

Anjouan is the fight a naval battle fought July 25, 1720, near the island of Anjouan, Comoros, between a pirate ship and a ship of the British East

India Company.

Fancy and the Victory, two pirate ships commanded by Irishman Edward England, surprise near the island Johanna (Anjouan), two Dutch merchant

ships and a British ship, Cassandra. The Dutch fled, pursued by the Victory, commanded by John Taylor, second in England, while the latter aboard

the Fancy is about to face the Cassandra, who seems determined to defend himself.

The fight is fierce and the British, galvanized by their captain James Macrae, fight like lions, inflicting terrible losses to pirates. Both boats run

aground, but the fight does not stop either. The pirates eventually won out, however, losing 90 of them and killing 77 sailors of Cassandra which they

seize, making this opportunity hands on a booty of 75,000 pounds. Macrae and surviving sailors, for their part, jumped out and fled to the island.

The Fancy is in a sorry state and its crew is stunned by the terrible struggle he had to support. Taylor back with the Victory is appalled by the

spectacle. When a few days later, Macrae and his men, hungry, returning imploring mercy of pirates, the latter encouraged by Taylor, want revenge

and threaten to hang them. But England is a former naval officer and is reluctant to commit atrocities. It shows so magnanimous and allows its

enemies to board the Fancy and go free.*

The Governor of Bombay offshore returns Macrae, accompanying a fleet laden with England and his men capture. When he realizes that this is

Macrae is on their trail, John Taylor, approved by most of his men, laid England because of the consequences of his magnanimity, fatal to them..

Taylor took command of Cassandra and says that of the Victory in the Olivier Levasseur said La Buse, a French pirate who joined him some time

later and whose exploits soon headlines in the Indian Ocean ports. As for Macrae and his men, after many adventures, they reach the Indian coast

on board a ship which is a wreck. Highly commended for his heroic resistance, Macrae subsequently became Governor of Madras from 1725 to 1730.

Albert Lougnon, "Sous le signe de la tortue. Voyages anciens à l'île Bourbon (1611-1725)", Azalées Éditions, 1992

* Is it possible ? it was on the attack of the Cabo ! perhaps the pirates changed the name of the boats , before or after the fight to avoid being sought.

And then The Cassandra was renamed the fancy !! ?? :rolleyes:

220px-England%2C_Edward.JPG220px-Flag_of_Edward_England.svg.png

Edward England and his flag .

Edited by La Buse

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Reflection :

Before the attack , England was the Commodore , after , Taylor begin Commodore and then give the victory to La Buse and Seagar begin Cassandra's capitain renamed the Fancy.

And then they go to attack the Cabo !

??

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Both Richard Moor and Captain McCrae say that after capturing the Cassandra at Johanna the pirates gave their ship, the Fancy, to McCrae. If the Count of Ericeira thought that the pirates ships were called Fantasie and Victorieux that suggests that the pirates renamed the Cassandra as Fancy.

As to who was in command of which ship, Richard Moor, who spent a great deal of time aboard the pirate vessels, is quite clear. He says that Taylor and Seagar commanded the Victory and Seagar commanded the Cassandra/Fancy. He goes on to say that La Buse replaced Seagar when Seagar died at Madagascar, shortly after the capture of the Cabo. If the Count of Ericeira though la Buse was captain then perhaps that shows that la Buse was the one who conducted the negotiations (in French), and therefore gave the impression of being in command.

I am agree !

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Hi All,

I to have a fascination with this particular pirate, and am interested to learn more, so may i pose a few questions of my own, but mainly to do with his time in 1717.

Having spent his time with Benjamin Hornigold , Samuel Bellamy, Paul Williams in 1716, on leaving the group La Buse left roughly 9th Jan 1717 at isle Blanco, he went to the Bahama`s as was reported june 1717, his next sightings are off Antigua 5 months later.

So my questions are ...where did he go? was it to do with the lack of finding a crew due to the pardon on offer to all pirates on the American coast`s? or did he go in search of his old hunting buddy Benjamin Hornigold? Did the dynamics change once Hornigold had been ousted by Samuel Bellamy and Paul Williams his side kick? Was it actually possible that La Buse was sighted further up the Amerian coast that was previously thought?

Also , prior to 1716, what French vessels were taken by Hornigold? Is this where La Buse came to become a pirate? by capture and offer of joining.

many thanks,

sea haugh

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411. i. Copy of deposition of Joseph Eels of Port Royall, Carpenter, Dec. 20, 1716. Deponent last March sett sail on board the Mary sloop, Capt. Leigh Ashworth commander, and soon after arrived at blewfields, where they found Capt. Jennings, Capt. Carnigee and Capt. Liddal, and from thence sail'd in company with them designing for the wrecks. About six leagues from Baya Honda they spyed a sloop with two periaguas putting from her, and found her to be Capt. Young's, who told Capt. Ashworth they were two maroon periaguas, and had obliged him to tow them over from the bay of Honduras, etc. Describes boarding and capture of a French ship in the Bay of Hondo, by abovenamed. A periagua commanded by a Spaniard informed them that there was in Porto Mariel a French ship a trading, whereupon Carnigee went to seek her, but next morning the periagua which had followed him reported that Hornigold had taken the French ship, whereupon Jennings and Ashworth weighed anchor to go after them, but not being able to overtake them stood in again to the Bay, and came to an anchor, the ship being in the offing, one of the periaguas being on board ship and several of her men halled her alongside and threw the money being about 28,500 odd peices of eight into the periagua and immediately went away with it. Soon afterwards the ship came in again and acquainted Jennings and Ashworth the money was gone, and then by order of Jennings one of the periaguas was cut to peices and Young's sloop burnt. Next morning Carnigie halled aboard the ship and hoisted out of his sloope into the ship all his guns ammunition provitions and stores, and going on board with his men took the command of her without controul. Jennings, Ashworth and Carnigie weighing anchor in order to go to Providence, and coming out of the harbour Carnigee gave the Frenchmen that were left on board the ship his sloop, and then all three sail'd for Providence where arriving they shared the goods in three parts one for the owner of the three sloops, and the other two for the men. The owner's share of the goods were put on board the sloop Dolphin, and then wrote to Mr. Daniel Axtell and to his brother Jasper Ashworth. Deponent saw part of the letter, importing they had taken a ship, and that the sloop was coming with the goods taken out of the ship. Deponent, with James Spatcher, Commander of the Dolphin, delivered the above letters to Daniel Axtell, who ordered the sloop to go from Cowboy to Pigeon Island, and thence to Manatee Bay, whence deponent and others brought dry goods in a canoe from the Dolphin to Port Royal, Mr. Axtell receiving them himself into his storehouse at night. After which the sloop being seized by Fernando in Manatee Bay was sent into Port Royal Harbour, etc., etc. Signed, Joseph Eels. Endorsed as preceding. 1½ pp. [C.O. 137, 12. Nos. 41, 41 i.; and (without enclosures) 138, 15. pp. 204–212.]

???????

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Hi All,

Thank you La Buse, that is where i had them, in April 1716 off Hondura`s , via the testiments and examinations of other various pirates who said their piece in May 1717.

It is prior to April 1716, that i wish to delve more into, to see how far back i can get it. I am also attempting to work it from the Calais , France side and build on it from his alleged birthplace.

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Salut !

I have not found what he was doing before.

Besides, this is Colin Woodard in "The Republic of Pirates" who does appear.

I do not know what historical sources!

In France, some say "he was born on 11/02/1672 in Calais, son of a family of small bourgeaois he entered the naval school and became an officer. It will longtimes a brave seaman and servile Royal until one day no one knows how it can be found in piracy and there was no trace of this mutation. "

others say he was educated in Bordeaux!

But no sources to prove it.

But perhaps a track:

In this story where we find the first time his name he is called "Louis de Boure"

" Deposition of Abijah Savage, Commander of the sloop Bonetta of Antigua. Antigua, 30th Nov., 1716. On 9th Nov. between St. Thomas and St. Cruix he was overhauled and plundered by two pirate sloops, who also took a French ship and six sail of small vessels, keeping the French ship etc. One, called the Mary Anne, was commanded by Samuel Bellamy who declared himself to be an Englishman born in London, and the other, the Postillion, by Louis de Boure a Frenchman, who had his sloop chiefly navigated with men of that Nation. Each sloop was mounted with 8 guns, and had betwixt 80 or 90 men. The Mary Anne was chiefly navigated with Englishmen. Deponent was detained at St. Cruix. The pirates only wanted provisions and a ship to make a voyage. Gives names of some of the pirates etc. Signed, Habbjah Savage."

This seems very precise, but no trace in the library of France!

I searched why he took that name and I found a French town in Acadia "Louisbourg" or Louisburg in English.

800px-Acadia_1754.png

Quebec1-1700.gif

Maybe there is increased or stayed in from France!

"Louisbourg is an ancient town of Isle Royale. Founded in 1713, the city is then chosen by the French Government in order to build a great fortress responsible for defending Canada's entry in the St. Lawrence River."

I continue to search...

Edited by La Buse

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