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wes1761

17th Century English Reciepts

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Found this tidbit on a different site I moderate on, in our new 17th Century Forum:

http://www.godecookery.com/engrec/engrec.html

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I think I will be looking at these again, and my other period cookery books, again, with an eye to the fact that we will still be in Lent on Privateer Day. It could be a useful talking point.

Thanks for the link. I lost that one when my old computer died.

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Don't forget lent don't count on Sundays =o)

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Don't count on weekdays either for me! Although I have a knee-jerk tendency to want fish sticks (fingers?) on Fridays after growing up with school lunches.

Here's a question: Where does chocolate fall in those rules? I was grinding cocoa nibs for "cakes" (not the tasty ones, just round bits of unsweetened chocolate) and it was Ash Wednesday. One of my Catholic friends said it was off the menu, another said it's a plant, so it's ok. So is period chocolate made with water, sugar and spices OK during Lent in the GAoP?

Don't forget lent don't count on Sundays =o)

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Legend goes that they tried to ban it but El Papa asked to try some before he could decide and it was sooooooooooooooooo good he refused, mind you same legend is told about coffee in lent.

Sides it's only Papists that have to do the lent thing, CofE/Anglicans it's purely voluntary after1538/9 when No8 gets rid of all lenten strictures.

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Legend goes that they tried to ban it but El Papa asked to try some before he could decide and it was sooooooooooooooooo good he refused, mind you same legend is told about coffee in lent.

Sides it's only Papists that have to do the lent thing, CofE/Anglicans it's purely voluntary after1538/9 when No8 gets rid of all lenten strictures.

Thanks! I shall happily display, roast, grind and mix my cacao beans during Lent. biggrin.gif Off to sort out some more equipment, and keeping my fingers crossed that the metate doesn't get broken in transit!

Jen

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I heard tell that there is animal fats used in American chocolates, hence it's creamy and wonderful flavor (Meat makes everything better, ye see.) so perhaps that's where the info your friend told you was rooted in.

On the original note of the 17th cent. recipies, I will definiately be gandering through that website and seeing what new tortures I can put me crew through, so ye have me thanks!

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Milk chocolate, yep. Definitely animal fat in milk (and lots of other stuff in that chocolate). So perhaps that was the basis of my friend's thoughts, although it could just be that so many people give up chocolate for Lent he confused it with what's supposed to be of limits officially.

Period chocolate can be wonderful, but it doesn't contain milk or any other type of animal fat, just it's own. It's also very different than what many of us are used to consuming. Personally, the higher the percentage of chocolate, the better in my book (the stuff I've ground contains cacao, sugar, and sometimes things like cinnamon, ginger and cayenne, depending on what receipt I'm using). That creamy, milky stuff just doesn't pack the same punch. :D

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I read recently, and I hope to find it again, that Coca was not listed as taboo for lent because the pope at the time did not like it I have to recheck my dates.

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As just another guy pirate who thinks with his stomach, I'll have to talk to my mates who cook about some of these chocolate recipes.

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I read recently, and I hope to find it again, that Coca was not listed as taboo for lent because the pope at the time did not like it I have to recheck my dates.

It's vegetable matter if of the old 17th c. style, and fine for Lent. In the Middle ages, sweet dishes were eaten during Lent because of the strictures against meat, cheese, dairy products, eggs, olive oil, and wine. And working men had to keep their strength up. If consumed as a food, the strictures about whether it breaks a fast are tighter than is consumed as a drink or a medicinal preparation.

Edited by SilkenJack

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