Tar Bucket Bill

Flute, Recorder or Flageolet

3 posts in this topic

I've been trying to research what a common simple woodwind instrument would have been from 1690 to 1720 that a sailor may have carried with him aboard ship. I think this period of time is considered part of the Baroque Period.

I keep leaning toward the Flageolet [whistle flute], but I need input from those who are more knowledgable about musical instruments during this period of time. I have virtually no knowledge of music and instruments, because I have never been very musically inclined. But I wouldn't mind trying my hand at learning to play a small Flageolet-type instrument or fife, so that I could play some simple period songs at living history events some day while just sitting around relaxing.

I was thinking of either a Flageolet [whistle flute] or a side-blown fife with the embouchere --- both in the key of d. Soprano I think, not the larger D flutes. Like I say, I don't know much about this stuff, so I might be confusing you.

I am going to attempt to make a side-blown fife and a small whistle flute in the key of d out of 1/2" CPVC pipe and tune it on my friend's electronic tuner. There are plenty of instructions on the Internet for making them. And it would be something inexpensive with a decent sound that I can possibly learn on. A nice wooden one can cost $100 or so. I might get a nice wooden one at some later time if I can learn and see that I might stick with it.

But anyway, I could use some input from some of you experienced musicians who play woodwind instruments.

-Tar Bucket Bill

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I've been trying to research what a common simple woodwind instrument would have been from 1690 to 1720 that a sailor may have carried with him aboard ship. I think this period of time is considered part of the Baroque Period.

I keep leaning toward the Flageolet [whistle flute], but I need input from those who are more knowledgable about musical instruments during this period of time. I have virtually no knowledge of music and instruments, because I have never been very musically inclined. But I wouldn't mind trying my hand at learning to play a small Flageolet-type instrument or fife, so that I could play some simple period songs at living history events some day while just sitting around relaxing.

I was thinking of either a Flageolet [whistle flute] or a side-blown fife with the embouchere --- both in the key of d. Soprano I think, not the larger D flutes. Like I say, I don't know much about this stuff, so I might be confusing you.

I am going to attempt to make a side-blown fife and a small whistle flute in the key of d out of 1/2" CPVC pipe and tune it on my friend's electronic tuner. There are plenty of instructions on the Internet for making them. And it would be something inexpensive with a decent sound that I can possibly learn on. A nice wooden one can cost $100 or so. I might get a nice wooden one at some later time if I can learn and see that I might stick with it.

But anyway, I could use some input from some of you experienced musicians who play woodwind instruments.

-Tar Bucket Bill

Recorders were popular for hundreds of years although they went out of style by the end of the 18th century. A flageolet is basically a recorder without the thumb hole. It became popular during the second half of the 17th century. These are easier to play than side-blown flutes but they lack dynamic range (you can't play louder or softer without changing pitch) which is why they went out of style.

All of these are appropriate for the GAoP. Since they were so common, they have the range for nearly all period music.

Mark

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Great! Thanks Mark.

I have diagram and plans for both the PVC whistle flute and the PVC side-blown fife in the D(5) key. I will attempt to make both versions, although I think the whistle flute might be easier for me to learn the basics on.

~~~ Scientific Musical Scale versus Natural Musical Scale ~~~

I understand that the scientific musical scale is rather recent and that before that, music was played in the natural musical scale. It must be true --- I read it on the Internet. /;^)

I plan to tune the flutes with the aid of my friend's electronic tuner. However, I don't know if it is capable of tuning in the natural musical scale or not. If not, does anyone know how to tune a windblown instrument in the natural musical scale? I assume the notes sound differently in each scale. ???

As I mentioned, I don't know anything about music and instruments, so forgive me if these questions sound dumb or confusing. But I would prefer that the flutes to be tuned in the natural musical scale for a period sound. Any help any of you can offer would be greatly appreciated.

-Tar Bucket Bill

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