Jib

Do's and Don'ts when attending a Pyrate Event

76 posts in this topic

Hence the reason to keep reenactors & performers behind the rope. ;)

There is no reason for someone at a public event to be so polluted. Don't "peace tie" arms, kick the drunks out.

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As a festival co-ordinator, we also have to follow the city's ordinances and rules. Some allow weapons, some do not. One of the events I put on allowed patrons to carry swords, but not a single vendor could sell one. Didn't quite make sense, but had to follow their rules to get permits, police etc.

It really has no rhyme or reason, just the whim of the city or town.

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Do watch your language if children are about. Parents frown on kids learning to "talk like a pirate" and dropping the F-bomb! I might suggest jargon instead. That will keep your tone correct and your intent unknown!

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Do watch your language if children are about. Parents frown on kids learning to "talk like a pirate" and dropping the F-bomb! I might suggest jargon instead. That will keep your tone correct and your intent unknown!

That may be valid at pirate festivals, but at living history events, I don't sanitize for the public. History should not be disneyfied.

Hawkyns

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Ain't nothing like a Two Bit Sand Dollar! Eye concur about language....

Eye must add that bad hacked accents are not value added! LoL

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Number one rule...No matter how responsible he looks, never hand your pistol to a monkey.

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Number one rule...No matter how responsible he looks, never hand your pistol to a monkey.

Or Cousin Robbie...wait, is that redundant? :P

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Ain't nothing like a Two Bit Sand Dollar! Eye concur about language....

Eye must add that bad hacked accents are not value added! LoL

Actually, that's a really good point:

Only do an accent if you can really do an accent. If you're not sure, ask an impartial judge - preferably someone who speaks in a similar accent themselves, only naturally. But if it comes down to putting on a bad accent, and just sounding like a middle class 21st Century American, go with the latter.

However, I'm wholly in favor of both accents and jargon when done well.

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2)Peace tie ye weapons ~

Eye have had drunkin patrons

try to pull my own weapons before..

It is a good rule.

I'll disagree with that one. I don't peace tie my weapons and it bugs the hell out of me when I have to do it at those fairs where it is required. I think it it might be reasonable for new people or for people who only carry for show. On the other hand, weapons are what I do. I know where my sword and pistols are and who's near them. 30 years of carrying a sword on my hip, training with it, and teaching it give me the clue. And I never drink when carrying, so the "drunk in a bar' scenario doesn't apply.

I think the rule should be more like "know your weapons and your weapons capabilities". If you only carry occasionally, or have never trained, or tend to drink more than one or two, then peace tie or don't carry. If you take your weapons seriously, train with them as you would any martial art, and make them part of yourself, then peace tieing is unnecessary.

Hawkyns

I'm with you Hawkyns. In all these years I've never been "pulled on". People have tried but I always have my weapon protected like anyone else who would consider it a weapon rather than a costume accessory. I like being able to show kids it and pose with it. I was trained properly on it years ago. And I would agree, if you're a newbie, maybe you'd better keep it tied because it does take time to learn how to keep it safe while enjoying your day as a non peace-tied pirate.

That said, I don't go to many organized events that require it. Most of the events here in Florida (outside of ren-faires) don't require it and they didn't in Seattle either. So I've just been fortunate. If the law requires it, I do it, and more than once I've cut it away once inside.

-- Hurricane

Edited by hurricane

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IF YOU MAKE A COMMITMENT TO BE SOMEWHERE OR DO SOMETHING, DON'T WALK OFF AND EXPECT OTHERS TO PICK UP YOUR PIECES.

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Since we're cousins, I have to agree with Robbie and add, don't stand around with yer thumb up yer arse while everyone else is breaking their backs setting up, breaking down, or attending to any other kind of work required... pull yer thumb out and lend a hand... and don't be afraid to ASK if you aren't sure what to do... no one appreciates people standing around watching them do all the hard stuff on their own... many hands make for light work and there are no "captains" when it comes to the dirty work.

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Number one rule...No matter how responsible he looks, never hand your pistol to a monkey.

Who let Mr. O'Keeffe out of his cage??? :P

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Might I also add to thank the public for attending the event. In today's harsh economy simply saying "thanks for joining us" can help events the following year.

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That is perhaps the best advice I've heard Jib. With reduced corporate sponsorship the public's coin can make or break a festival and if they're not enjoying themselves and feel as if they are merely interrupting everyone's fun, they won't be back. And with that goes the money that keeps these things going.

PiP is a perfect example... without bucks there's no buccaneers. A simple thank you to the attending public is essential.

-- Hurricane

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And it's amazing how a simple word of thanks can brighten a patrons day!

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Since we're cousins, I have to agree with Robbie and add, don't stand around with yer thumb up yer arse while everyone else is breaking their backs setting up, breaking down, or attending to any other kind of work required... pull yer thumb out and lend a hand... and don't be afraid to ASK if you aren't sure what to do... no one appreciates people standing around watching them do all the hard stuff on their own... many hands make for light work and there are no "captains" when it comes to the dirty work.

'Tis so true! Lend a hand, mates!

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I've read through the posts and I am pleased with what I see. So... I'd like to add to it:

I've been a special skills performer for approx. 20 years (also in the entertainment industry since I was 8 - I'm 42) and I own my own festival so there's been a 'both sides of the fence' thing for me and I use those experiences to shape the rules for the actors and attendees.

Swords and Alcohol: Our rules state that if we are in character we are not to have alcohol. I always make sure one (or all) of my pirate pots are with us and filled with bottled water. This means we can give the look of 'alcohol' without actually drinking. Usually at the end of the night/day when the public is gone (or fading away) we will have one drink that gets stretched to fill the rest of the time. It makes sense and, to me, I don't care what your 'tolerance' is you are still an influence on others. It is amazing to also see how other events affect ours. This year, based on something that happened at a completely different event, we had to have a weapons check at the pub because the peace bonding we have for the even itself was not to the satisfaction of the RCMP. Out of the blue.. Who knows.. Next year may be back to that last 3 year's rules. The audience/playtrons/etc was fine with it and we were very lucky that it didn't seem to affect any sales or support.

Interrupting other performers: Yeah.. That one is tough. You can't police that and can only hope that the other performer winds up looking bad, not you. Many of our friends push us to take part in a show or a presentation. I love the fact that we have support but I will not join in unless the performer invites me. And we've been invited. It's great. It's like earning your wings. But yeah.. All you can do is hope another will give you the same consideration. And the insult thing also mentioned. Okay.. I know we're pirates but unless your character is set up for that (the receiving character that is) don't. I've come back with some doozies when another 'pirate' treats Charity like a wench and degrades her. It is obvious that she isn't. If you're that frustrated, go find a wench. Don't continue to interfere with the other pirates routine. As this is a also a HUGE community (much like Trek was in it's peak) there is bound to be fractions. I've watched many a group with members coming and going. Even we've had that and we're not as established and long lived as folks like The Seattle Seafarers. The worse part about it is when factions steamed from a group or other groups created from those factions, do things that make audience/customers/playtrons/other performers, paranoid or uncomfortable. If it is fresh (or even if it is lingered) save it for a one on one with that person. Respect the performance. Don't go out of your way to linger in the areas they are in or hover just in sight, knowing that they hurt. In other words.. Don't use the energy you carry to cause them to falter on the show nor discredit them. People will discredit themselves, over time, but to make yourself the enemy just because you're hurt (so are they folks) is making the audience and other performers pay for your emotions. Not worth it. Really.. It is a form of interruption and I've been a victim of that as well as seen many really good performers (with low self esteem) be taken down by others doing this and when the others go down, no one is left.

Attendees/Playtrons: Respect for each other is good. I like all the advice about knowing a little about the subject matter of the event and knowing if it is a reenactment or something a little more relaxed and/or commercial. I've also seen quite a bit of disrespect for performers on that one. In all my years of being around this sort of event, I've seen no shortage of rude remarks to the performers about not being accurate or stage fighting isn't real so the actors are whimps or even walking up to a fellow attendee and criticising their outfit..... Hey look.. A Star Trek con... There is a ton of similarities in most 'pop culture' events/gatherings. History or not, if it is popular then it is claimed by pop culture. IT really isn't worth it. If you are there for you and simply find the aspects of the event that make you happy, then you have spent your entry fee wisely. I would love to see an event where all in attendance actually goes just to have fun not poke fun.. You know what I mean? I know.. Big dream but...

I'd also like to see attending folk not criticize the vendors. That'd be nice. The price is the price. If you don't like that vendor or the product, don't buy from them. I see, too often, folks try to shutdown a vendor due to a personal disagreement or a price that they feel is too high. Recently at an event a perfect example came up. A friend wanted to buy me a new pouch and she asked which pouch. My description of the booth and the pouch I wanted wasn't as clear as we had hoped. There is a vendor I don't really like. In my world their product is too much money for too little product and the shape of their pouches don't fit the space on my belt and lower back. But the friend was in a rush and she went to the first person she saw with pouches and bought the wrong one from the wrong vendor. It had to be returned and one from the right vendor was purchased. Now... I could go on and on for people not to buy from the first mentioned vendor but I won't. They have their fans and their customers and that's cool. My friend could bitch about it too. They wouldn't refund, only store credit. To me that's bad form but my friend found it acceptable. So.. Her call not mine. This is good form. I won't speak on her behalf and we will never tell people to not buy at the one vendor. It isn't our job to upset or impress the customers of these vendors. It is theirs.

I have to dash... Work is calling...

Thank you for giving me this space to just... well.. Share...

Later.

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If you've never attended an event in full garb before make sure to bring plenty of bottled water and sunscreen with you. It gets really hot dresed as a pirate during the spring and summer

As someone who's never re-enacted, I'm curious: why is this? Given that pirates had to live and work all day under a hot Caribbean or Red Sea sun as often as not, why would they wear very hot clothes?

Well, that question might be better suited to the "Captain's Twill" area, but it also applies here....

So my two cents worth.

It depends on what you are doing. If you are going for a more pirate themed event or festival... Then dress for comfort and to be showy.

But for more historical re-enactment, then it would be more advisable to wear your waistcoats/weskits and if the temperature warrants your sailor's coat. People throughout history have dressed inappropriately by modern standards for comfort. It is remarkable what societal pressures apply to cultures throughout the world at various points in history. Even today there are plenty of cultures around the world that mandate full coverage despite the local temperatures and heat. Make sense?

I completely agree with my good friend Michael. I'll also add a couple suggestions that may have been mentioned because I'm too lazy to check all the past replies.

At faires, you have rules and laws for behavior that should be followed out of curtesy to the performers and the public. You really don't have to be historically correct, because to be honest, the typical faire goer won't know the difference anyway. Here is where you can be creative But NEVER and I mean NEVER try to take part in a skit or try to harass and or show disrespect to a performer. This is not your playground so don't crap in their sandbox. Bottom line is have fun, but behave yourself.

At historical events, you should tdo some research or get advice from the folks that have been trying to do more PFC

To be honest, there is no way that any one can do a totally "Period Correct" impression... (Get it? PC.) So in many cases we have to settle for PFC which if you read between the lines is Pretty F'n Close!

This means that you do what you can to make your impression as close as "practical" or "possible" without making youself miserable or breaking yoru bank. Rember this is suppose to be fun. So don't make yourself crazy trying to be perfect.

Now at historical type reenactments, you have two issues to address. Are you taking part or are you not. If you are taking part, you would expect the organizers to have prior knowledge of your impressions and behavior, which is more than likely why you were invited to begin with.

Make yourself as usefull as possible. Everything from staged fighting to helping crowd control so no one gets hurt is important.

Note: Spectators can totally be like cattle and have no clue where they are and sometimes don't enen care.

Anyway make yourself useful to the director of reenactors so that they know what you are capable of and how they can use you. Don't just stand around! Mannequins can do the same job and anyone can hold up a wall, so get involved. But be safe!!!

OK that's enough, and just for the record this is more that I have written in a reply for a couple years. So even if you think I'm full of it, these suggestions are exactly that. But if one of my suggestions help you, it was well worth the read.

Take care and be safe

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OK so I probably should have and I suggest others to read the past replies... They are well worth the read!

They probably would have saved me twenty minutes or so to write mine!

Go figure!

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One thing to add, if you are coming to an event and want to shoot be prepared to follow their rules. If you can find out the black powder rules before hand all that much better. Inspect your weapon yourself before handing it off to be inspected, if powder is provided and you plan on bringing your own turn it in as soon as you get to the event. If the shoot is at 12 and you should meet at 1130 don't be late. If you disagree with how things are done take the high road and don't shoot. Voice your concerns but don't be upset. Above all follow their rules . . .

A few examples (using FTPI as most have been there)

"My pistol doesn't fire on FF so Ill just use the FFF or FFFF in my flask"

"My musket doesnt make a bang with so little powder so Ill double up on charges"

"A flash guard and frizzen stall are stupid and not nessary on my pistol"

Some concerns get addressed and exceptions are made. Flash guards are a perfect example many people would rather not shoot than install one and having been addressed space is now given and exceptions are allowed. When a concern is raised by a majority it is typically looked to and addressed.

I was shooting cannons the past couple years and only overheard about these issues from upset people. Those shooting weapons please remember that while in your backyard its your rules but while in somebody elses back yard its their rules. There have been many events I have travelled to that I have not shot my guns at because I disagree with how things are done.

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Well said, Commodore !! I have also not fired at events where I disagree with the rules. Not worth arguing about, just let it be.....

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With warm weather season now approaching perhaps a few more suggestions could join the forum?

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What Commodore Swab said. IF you can't follow the rules of an event, don't attend that event. It creates unforeseen problems and unwelcome friction where one should exist.


Focus on the 'DO' at any event.

Do follow the rules.

Do volunteer to lend a hand.

Do go out of your comfort zone and introduce yourself to pirates from all walks of the hobby.

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stepping out the comfort zone seems like an easy thing for someone dressed like a pirate. Honestly I think that is the hardest thing to do, especially if you don't know anyone at an event.

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Being a loner and naturally given to lurk in the shadows I often fail to speak to others. Not trying to be stand-offish, just my nature to be quiet, and listen. I find after more than 50 years around humans I tend to learn more when I speak less.

Looking forward to this season and rejoining the family of "strange" people that makes this hobby what it is!

Bo

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