Lieutenant Alex

Pirate Concept Art

48 posts in this topic

Hey,

First time posting on this part of the forum, Im posting some of my development work for college on designing a pirate character. I probaly have 50 drawings done over the weeks. Here are the first few, please feel free to criticize the clothing etc being it your expertise as pirate lovers :). It may not all be time relevant being alot of my research is from all over the 18th century. :)

img103.jpg

img101.jpg

img099.jpg

Edited by Lieutenant Alex

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Good start lad ....learn to draw what you see (from life is best but photos can be the next best source) check your body positions by looking in a mirror to double check your body positions. But keep going you'll do well with it!!!

I hope you'll take this as constructive, learning to observe and translate that into believeable images is more difficult than most people think.

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Good start lad ....learn to draw what you see (from life is best but photos can be the next best source) check your body positions by looking in a mirror to double check your body positions. But keep going you'll do well with it!!!

I hope you'll take this as constructive, learning to observe and translate that into believeable images is more difficult than most people think.

The body has some nice work- you are working the angles and some of the contours really well- but the shoes are still- not even cartoony. Feet are hard- but that is where I would suggest you practice. I know- I'm having problems with feet and hands now myself- your hands are coming along nicely. Also, perhaps practice more dynamic poses, not just side or dead on views, try 3/4 views, explore the movement of the body. Explore foot stance, and balance. Explore angles, and perspective.

just my 2 shillings.

Edited by Gunpowder Gertie

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Good start lad ....learn to draw what you see (from life is best but photos can be the next best source) check your body positions by looking in a mirror to double check your body positions. But keep going you'll do well with it!!!

I hope you'll take this as constructive, learning to observe and translate that into believeable images is more difficult than most people think.

The body has some nice work- you are working the angles and some of the contours really well- but the shoes are still- not even cartoony. Feet are hard- but that is where I would suggest you practice. I know- I'm having problems with feet and hands now myself- your hands are coming along nicely. Also, perhaps practice more dynamic poses, not just side or dead on views, try 3/4 views, explore the movement of the body. Explore foot stance, and balance. Explore angles, and perspective.

just my 2 shillings.

cheers, the poses came out of my head so ;) yeah the feet arent really a area im concerned with B) and in the middle drawing i just rushed them to convey the stance B) cheers for the tips tho

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My favorite of the lot is the gap-toothed pirate with the eyepatch, very well done. Lots of pirates and sailors were missing teeth because of scurvy. The second pirate standing on the rock is also good because of his ponytail; sailors tended to prefer ponytails and braids to keep their hair out of their eyes, so while the long flowing hair does tend to give a bit of a "wild man" look, it's not very historical.

About your weapons: the cutlass hily in the first picture is very nice, but the blade curves the wrong way. And flintlock guns almost always have the lock on the right side, not the left as in the third picture.

I generally like the full-figure pirate in the last picture, but his sword is quite a bit too big to be practical, and his hat needs to be narrowed and sit a bit lower on his head.

Of course, I myself would be happy to produce anything half as good as what you have done here.

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My favorite of the lot is the gap-toothed pirate with the eyepatch, very well done. Lots of pirates and sailors were missing teeth because of scurvy. The second pirate standing on the rock is also good because of his ponytail; sailors tended to prefer ponytails and braids to keep their hair out of their eyes, so while the long flowing hair does tend to give a bit of a "wild man" look, it's not very historical.

About your weapons: the cutlass hily in the first picture is very nice, but the blade curves the wrong way. And flintlock guns almost always have the lock on the right side, not the left as in the third picture.

I generally like the full-figure pirate in the last picture, but his sword is quite a bit too big to be practical, and his hat needs to be narrowed and sit a bit lower on his head.

Of course, I myself would be happy to produce anything half as good as what you have done here.

yeah the sword in the last drawing looks more like a scimitar XD wasnt looking at my cutlass research when i drew it B) thanks alot ;D!

Edited by Lieutenant Alex

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Good start lad ....learn to draw what you see (from life is best but photos can be the next best source) check your body positions by looking in a mirror to double check your body positions. But keep going you'll do well with it!!!

I hope you'll take this as constructive, learning to observe and translate that into believeable images is more difficult than most people think.

The body has some nice work- you are working the angles and some of the contours really well- but the shoes are still- not even cartoony. Feet are hard- but that is where I would suggest you practice. I know- I'm having problems with feet and hands now myself- your hands are coming along nicely. Also, perhaps practice more dynamic poses, not just side or dead on views, try 3/4 views, explore the movement of the body. Explore foot stance, and balance. Explore angles, and perspective.

just my 2 shillings.

cheers, the poses came out of my head so ;) yeah the feet arent really a area im concerned with B) and in the middle drawing i just rushed them to convey the stance B) cheers for the tips tho

Remember that your work is a whole. You have a nice sense of sophistication happening in some of your body drawing- but unfortunately the lack of skill in the feet, totally pulls the eye away from the great parts of the drawing. Feet are important. They give the figure balance.

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I agree with Gertie here, and I'd say your strongest point is your faces. You definitely have a knack for catching the expression of the subjects, which is something I've always had a difficult time with.

Daniel's points about the pistol and sword are also very true, and I was going to point them out myself. The other thing about the weapons is, on the second bloke, his sword is sitting at a sort of awkward angle in his baldric. Many a sword that was not particularly well secured into the scabbard would fall out sitting at an angle like that. The sword hilt itself, however, is very nice.

Other than that I've got no major criticisms. Your work shows real promise, and an eye for detail. Kudos, mate!

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I agree with Gertie here, and I'd say your strongest point is your faces. You definitely have a knack for catching the expression of the subjects, which is something I've always had a difficult time with.

Daniel's points about the pistol and sword are also very true, and I was going to point them out myself. The other thing about the weapons is, on the second bloke, his sword is sitting at a sort of awkward angle in his baldric. Many a sword that was not particularly well secured into the scabbard would fall out sitting at an angle like that. The sword hilt itself, however, is very nice.

Other than that I've got no major criticisms. Your work shows real promise, and an eye for detail. Kudos, mate!

i have a feeling u would believe me if i said it but i kinda realized when i was drawing the baldric that if i put a sword in here it would balently fall out i just couldnt be bothered with re drawing it B) lazy ! B) thanks for the feedback regardless tho :)!

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I would have to say that if the feet are the only problem then you don't have far to go. However, and speaking from experience, if you stop improving you may as well stop drawing. I think you have accomplished much and have untapped potential. You clearly have talent. I found that it helped me to get the shoes and boots & gloves & clothing right if I first started with the basic fugure. Find some books on figure drawing and foreshortening, take drawing classes weather in school or not, work on still life drawings, they will help with things like swords and pistols and ...well everything. If you can't take a class just keep drawing and doing just what you are doing ...having others critique your work.

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I would have to say that if the feet are the only problem then you don't have far to go. However, and speaking from experience, if you stop improving you may as well stop drawing. I think you have accomplished much and have untapped potential. You clearly have talent. I found that it helped me to get the shoes and boots & gloves & clothing right if I first started with the basic fugure. Find some books on figure drawing and foreshortening, take drawing classes weather in school or not, work on still life drawings, they will help with things like swords and pistols and ...well everything. If you can't take a class just keep drawing and doing just what you are doing ...having others critique your work.

yeah well im still 17 and studying in college but this project will enable me to get my place at uni :) i can draw feet i just haven't made the effort here ill definitely put more effort into the next few sketches for you guys! :)

on a totally unrelated drawing this was something a drew a few months ago.

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This was a small chunk of some anatomy research i did when i was designing a character :) i know know that i was slightly enlarging the calf muscles etc

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just thought this picture kinda showed a more complete drawing ^-^ feet n all :) this is a few months old as well

Edited by Lieutenant Alex

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Aye and that it does.

I went back to the start of the thread and you DID ask for critique on garb & gear not technique.

Since your images are from later in the 1700's I can't help you much. I "live" in the earlier part of the 1700's and am still learning so I dare not venture for anything much later than 1720's

My suggestion, as you have likely found, The forum here titled "Captain Twill". Images and information about it all ...well about all we are about here. You'll find the thread on Bucket boots quit ...controversial. lol

Can't wait to see more sketches and the eventual finished images!

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its fine, ive found some information really helpful anyway. thanks for taking the time to post

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another sketch. lowered hat, maybe needs more lowering, tried drawing a waist coat for a change. the torso looks quite flat to me but im still working on it. the proportions look pretty solid i edited the left leg in the picture because it had a awkward pose before hand :) also i tried the pose on my self this time and this is how i found my feet facing. 1 forward and one pointing away, i think i should of faced the left foot inwards a little more tho ;)

img107copy-1.jpg

Edited by Lieutenant Alex

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Very nice work! This is the best one yet.

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another sketch. lowered hat, maybe needs more lowering, tried drawing a waist coat for a change. the torso looks quite flat to me but im still working on it. the proportions look pretty solid i edited the left leg in the picture because it had a awkward pose before hand :) also i tried the pose on my self this time and this is how i found my feet facing. 1 forward and one pointing away, i think i should of faced the left foot inwards a little more tho ;)

img107copy-1.jpg

Aye very good- yer renderin' is coming along nicely. Especially with the flowing fabric.As fer the stiffness of the pose you mentioned, try looking for the line of action within the body- this is a line that follows through the movement of the figure, and the pose.. For example, in this pose, the hips would likely not be completely turned forward, one hip would be slightly tipped back, with the back foot turned out as it is.Ditto with the shoulders. The legs and feet are still relatively stiff,and static although better than the last drawing. The perspective seems off on the breeches bottom edge, it appears as though it is above the knee- but it should be below- otherwise the knee appears to turn out at a strange angle. And the back foot is turned too much where you turned the knee- it looks broken.the foot stance is too extreme for the pose of the leg.Use reference material to render the legs as well- the blue pencil drawing you posted was much more fluid, and much more detailed about the legs yet I believe it was likely heavily referenced- from Gollum, perhaps? It shows you understand movement, as there was movement in that drawing. The human body is always in a state of unbalance from one pose to the next, so keep that in mind, sometimes the most dynamic poses are just on the verge of unbalance, if that makes sense. The arms have a very nice sense of volume, and it is again obvious you understand the workings of the arm- use that same kind of detail on the legs and feet. It's nice to see you working lightly, and constructing the pose with a lot of under or structural drawing..try breaking up the torso into chest and hips, turn them, rotate them slightly, individually,, and then fill in the abdomen after you set the posture of the body. Savvy? It may sound silly to you- but invest in one of those adjustable models where you can turn the torso, and limbs. Sculpt the legs and feet in modelling clay- it will help you in the long run to understand the construction, and will reflect in your drawing- I guarantee!

I'm offering this advice because you seem serious about your drawing, especially as you are going to school for it. I've helped with many a portfolio, and I was a professional artist, so I know where you are coming from, and I remember getting into school myself. If you show a portfolio that has movement in your drawings, you will get in for sure. It's not about pretty rendering a drawing, it's about understanding movement, anatomy, and structure. Working the drawing from the inside out.

Edited by Gunpowder Gertie

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Love this one! Your pirate art is coming along nicely!

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Aye, I agree that this one is your best yet! Good work, sir, my hat is off to you! ;)

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New

img108.jpg

Re worked the leg. Really happy with its stance now :)! thanks for the feedback everyone I read every word :)! stay tuned for more ;)

Edited by Lieutenant Alex

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New

img108.jpg

Re worked the leg. Really happy with its stance now :)! thanks for the feedback everyone I read every word :)! stay tuned for more ;)

THERE ya go! yes! Yes! Yes! Even the shoe construction is better!

Nice!

oh- and one more thing- it is apparent you are working "through" the drawing- by that I mean structurally you are following the line of an object through the figure, and the angles are all meeting, and aligning. And that is sometimes very hard to do. And that is very good!

Edited by Gunpowder Gertie

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Ditto to what Gertie said! Always good to see when someone pays attention to how things actually work within their drawings!

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;) well my life drawing teacher said to me recently that it was good to teach a student that genuinely enjoys drawing for a change B) im glad it shows in my work :) Funny enough im studying concept art for games and films at University when i start there in september. Ill get taught how to take my traditional skills digitally there, i didnt want to give the impression that im some fine arts student ;o I just progressed through trial and error, self teaching the mechanics of shading, anatomny etc ;) with guidence from teachers along the way. Ive only started getting feedback online this year and its made a big impact on my ability so far B)! so thanks again

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I've done much the same with my own art, and I should really try to post some here at some point, perhaps in my gallery. I'd be very interested to know about your experiences in pursuing concept art as a carreer. It has been a path I have considered taking for many years, but never knew the way to do so. I would be more inclined towards film than game desgin, but really all of it intrigues me, and I think it's one of the few things I would actually enjoy doing for a living (if indeed a living can be made at it, which is my greatest fear).

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I've done much the same with my own art, and I should really try to post some here at some point, perhaps in my gallery. I'd be very interested to know about your experiences in pursuing concept art as a carreer. It has been a path I have considered taking for many years, but never knew the way to do so. I would be more inclined towards film than game desgin, but really all of it intrigues me, and I think it's one of the few things I would actually enjoy doing for a living (if indeed a living can be made at it, which is my greatest fear).

Recently- after my accident, I talked to a local storyboard artist. He does quite a bit for Disney- anyway- he encouraged me to try and get into that field. But I don't have enough confidence to know I can walk into a meeting and just blow them away. I still need reference. I first came out here to take a course in digital animation- but my funding fell through. Then- my bro died and I had a car accident in quick succession. Hence my status as a "used to be" professional artist.

but let me just say- drawing for a living? Listening to music and drawing for about 8-10 hours a day? AND getting paid great money for it? Priceless.

Edited by Gunpowder Gertie

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;) well my life drawing teacher said to me recently that it was good to teach a student that genuinely enjoys drawing for a change B) im glad it shows in my work :) Funny enough im studying concept art for games and films at University when i start there in september. Ill get taught how to take my traditional skills digitally there, i didnt want to give the impression that im some fine arts student ;o I just progressed through trial and error, self teaching the mechanics of shading, anatomny etc ;) with guidence from teachers along the way. Ive only started getting feedback online this year and its made a big impact on my ability so far B)! so thanks again

It's obvious you have some real skill. In University your feedback will not always be as gentle as <ahem> it is here. It's good you are willing to listen. Stories abound of people working in animation being told their work is "crap" by their bosses.So- don't take it personally, and take the criticism as it is given- all in the name of making you a better artist.

Now-

to work on your posing!

Your posing so far is a bit static. Try - for your next drawing - to make it more dynamic. Not facing square to the viewer- but either a three quarter pose, with some movement. If these drawings are going into your portfolio- this would be the perfect kind of drawing to attempt!

Edited by Gunpowder Gertie

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