Barracuda Beth

to aquire our own ships

27 posts in this topic

How many of you own your own ships,or have wanted to own one?

After watching the PotC movie series and taking note on how obsessed Captain Jack Sparrow acted with The Black Pearl,I too been wanting to have a ship of my own.

I feel that for me,the easiest way to get my own ship,is to ask the Navy,to let me have one of their decomissioned ships.

What say you,on this matter?

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You could always build one, or have one built . . .

As for the US Navy, I'm not sure they'll let them go as easy as they did after WW2.

I wouldn't mind a launch, however!

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There are plenty of ships for sale... if you can afford them...

Or, build your own... Maybe not quite like what I have in mind with The Colonial Navy http://www.colonialnavy.org

A whole fleet of ships...

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Royaliste (the current owner who does post here occasionally) has been used by some pirate entusiasts for the last many years is currently up for sale...

The Royaliste

I've not sailed on her, but I have been onboard her for a brief tour a couple of times, and she is a nice ship.

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the us navy gave the city of norfolk, va. a battle ship 16in. guns. we have what they call the "ghost fleet" here. it's anchored out in the james river off of newport news. the goverment has been selling ships out of it for scrap for several years now.

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um beth...... the navy sells the decomissioned ships for scrap, and they are called decomissioned for a reason. they actually have to be rebuilt and powered in most cases. I rebuilt a pair of scarabs. they came to us with the engines and electronics out, the hulls had been run through with a forklift resulting in around 50 holes down each side. Sad, sad shape. the long and short of it was $130,000 to finish each out and they were never right after that. The guy that we did the work for sold them at a loss.

There are lots of good deals to be had on reposessed and abandoned boats. The local paper here has eight that the titles are being reclaimed, ranging from 50 ft trawlers to a 36 ft sailboat. The excuses are unable to make payments to unable to pay yard bills. Remember, boat= Break Out Another Thousand. If you are serious about it, take a weekend and just go wander around any boat yard that has a travel lift and see whats still on the hard. Boats should be in the water or being worked on in most parts of the country now. any that aren't are most likely having financial woes. you will see lots of for sale signs.

*edit- regards to silvers post. the navy DOES give ships away, but there are all sorts of hoops to go through. Primarily there has to be an established organization with a financial infrastructure to support the upkeep of the ship for X number of years. This includes the cleaning and removal of hazardous substances like lead or asbestos.

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the us navy gave the city of norfolk, va. a battle ship 16in. guns. we have what they call the "ghost fleet" here. it's anchored out in the james river off of newport news. the goverment has been selling ships out of it for scrap for several years now.

Charleston, SC still has an aircraft carrier (USS Yorktown- CV-10), a famous destroyer (USS Laffey-DD 724), a submarine (USS Clamagore- SS-43), and a seried of Coast Guard cutters (:USCGC Ingham- WHEC-35 and USCGC Comanche- WPG-76). On the carrier are 25 aircraft inc. an F-14, F-4, A-6, A-4, A-7 and more. On shore is a replica Viet Nam support base w/ a Huey, a Sea Cobra, PBR-105 river patrol boat, plus an array of missiles and guns.

http://www.patriotspoint.org/

Not bad for a town as small as Charleston, SC.

Oh, and on the other side of the Oyster Point peninsula is the reconstructed 1670s ketch Adventure at Charles Towne Landing . . .

Edited by Tartan Jack

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um beth...... the navy sells the decomissioned ships for scrap, and they are called decomissioned for a reason. they actually have to be rebuilt and powered in most cases. I rebuilt a pair of scarabs. they came to us with the engines and electronics out, the hulls had been run through with a forklift resulting in around 50 holes down each side. Sad, sad shape. the long and short of it was $130,000 to finish each out and they were never right after that. The guy that we did the work for sold them at a loss.

There are lots of good deals to be had on reposessed and abandoned boats. The local paper here has eight that the titles are being reclaimed, ranging from 50 ft trawlers to a 36 ft sailboat. The excuses are unable to make payments to unable to pay yard bills. Remember, boat= Break Out Another Thousand. If you are serious about it, take a weekend and just go wander around any boat yard that has a travel lift and see whats still on the hard. Boats should be in the water or being worked on in most parts of the country now. any that aren't are most likely having financial woes. you will see lots of for sale signs.

*edit- regards to silvers post. the navy DOES give ships away, but there are all sorts of hoops to go through. Primarily there has to be an established organization with a financial infrastructure to support the upkeep of the ship for X number of years.

Also, Naval ships that are given away need LOTS of work. For example, the above mentioned Yorktown has a couple/several full-time electrician and maintenance people whose job it is to keep the ship operating enough for the tours and tourists. And THAT is a for a ship sitting stationary in the mud . . . with large parts completely closed to the public (and horribly unsafe).

You'd be better off shopping around your local marinas, getting to know folks and so forth.

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i was in a cw group and we got a great deal. the ferry that crosses at jamestown was upgrading their life boats and we got 2 of the boats free, both were 28' one was oar powered the other diesel powered, the engine worked except for the starter, we would just hand pump the air start. rigged the diesel boat up to look like a steam launch. mounted a 12pdr in the bow and a spar torpedo. ran it up and down the elizabeth riv. for harborfest and cw events at fort norfolk. had a couple of fire fights with the american rover.

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also Beth and others remember that the rule of thumb is about $2000 per foot per year in upkeep and fees for a sailing vessel; so if you have, say, a 39' boat you'll need about $80,000 to keep it in tip-top shape per year sad.gif

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So . . .

Would a 10' dingy be 20,000/year?

Or is that mainly for cabined and decked sailing craft?

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How many of you own your own ships,or have wanted to own one?

After watching the PotC movie series and taking note on how obsessed Captain Jack Sparrow acted with The Black Pearl,I too been wanting to have a ship of my own.

I feel that for me,the easiest way to get my own ship,is to ask the Navy,to let me have one of their decomissioned ships.

What say you,on this matter?

Keep watching Ebay. I've seen real ships come up. There have been a couple that were specifically outfitted as Pirate ships. You can also find smaller, traditional wooden boats. Some of these can be a good deal. I bought a museum reproduction 17' Whitehall Pulling Boat (1-3 people can row it) on Ebay.

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Mark has some NICE boats too!

(Wish I had the $$$ to buy his plastic one from him.)

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Have you ever sailed lass?

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How many of you own your own ships,or have wanted to own one?

After watching the PotC movie series and taking note on how obsessed Captain Jack Sparrow acted with The Black Pearl,I too been wanting to have a ship of my own.

I feel that for me,the easiest way to get my own ship,is to ask the Navy,to let me have one of their decomissioned ships.

What say you,on this matter?

I am building a tops'l schooner. Find an inexpensive hull in good condition and re-rig it. I have spent last two years making spars, deadeyes,metal hardware. I do not have deep pockets. I pay as I go by working homecare and hospice. It can be done,

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Since I been reading way too much Classical Greek warfare history, including naval battles, I've been taken with a notion to build a...wait for it...a trireme. There actually is one afloat, commissioned by the Greek Navy, called the Olympias...be a neat thing to go cruising around it, if I could find a crew to man...err...person the oars. Anyone feel like a bit of exercise?

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I have my own "Ship". Built and marketed as the "Mini-Ship 34" by John Rhodes, Lighthouse Point Marine, Lighthouse Point, FL. What makes her a ship? She has a "boat deck". Her dinghy is carried on the coachtop accomodated by a davit. Her name is "Patience", she's power by a Perkins 6-354,135 h.p. Diesel. Best put, she "drinks 6, feeds 4 and sleeps 2!" Her hull is fiberglass, hand laid-up in Maine for the Lobster Fishery and finished by Rhodes. Her interior is African Mahogany with some beautiful joinery work. She's been my home since 1993 and I've cruised her from the Florida Keys to the Southern Outer Banks of North Carolina.

That said, let me go on to say that having worked in the Marine Industry from painting bottoms to Captain of some fine yachts, it ani't easy and it ain't cheap! The most expensive boats always seem to be the free ones! Callenish hit the nail on the head with some figures on "normal upkeep". That doesn't include the ever breaking, not "normal upkeep" items that are what gave these money pits their name, b.o.a.t. That's Break Out Another Thousand!

Before such a commitment as ownership I would recomend first become a crew member on a vessel of the type you would like to own. First, you would know if that's what you want and then what it takes to handle it. How big a crew, how it manuevers and such. If you still want to own a boat after that, Start Small! Begin with something you can handle yourself.

When I sold my last boat I was thrilled! I had just been relieved of 5 tons of Teak! Oh, I had loved her. We'd traveled over 5'000 miles but again, 5 tons of Teak. Soon after I found myself joyous again for I had found "Patience" and her only Teak was her hand rails! (now varnished mahogany).

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ahoy jamesorcas,

nice work mate. I dug around your youtube videos and they are well worth watching for inspiration, with an appreciated dose of insanity. Iris is one cool feline!

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my friend and I built our own brig. pics are in mt gallery, have a look and let me know what you think.

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Aye, I've often thought of having a pirate ship since I was a young lass. I'll obtain one if ever I win the Powerball Lottery.

~Lady B

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It might not be "traditional" but I could afford to buy it, I can afford to sail it, and it IS going to be an active pirate ship next year (IF I can find a crew!) LonestarAug2010007t.jpg

Edited by DeviousDi

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jamesorcas My Hats off to ye..! Eye hope ye keep posting updates as your ship comes together!

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Nonperiod: Own a Southcoast 22. Plans in the works to reinstall water pump on the Evinrude6, outfit with electronics, and recondition interior.

Period: Worked for a company that owned a 17th century sloop, great little thing, possibly trailerable, and flips in two halves, sloop-rigged. Heard it cost around $100k to build (using the finest of woods and techniques, of course). Would probably be the most efficient to take to events, set up, sail about, take down, trailer home. After working on the Kalmar Nyckel and still not being able to correctly identify half the lines on the foredeck (nobody ever ask me again where the sprits'l bowlines are!), I'm all for something that doesn't cost six months' of "vacation" time to service.

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If ye has the coin the HMS Pickle is fer sale not to pricy and big enough fer coastal raiding... err I mean cruising.

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What ever happened to jamesorcas?

Was enjoying his Youtube vidios of his schooner coming together.

I'd like to see more

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