Pew

The lingering lesson . . .

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I have a lesson or two approaching in my World History class regarding the GAoP. We have recently covered the Triangular Trade (Middle Passage) and the Columbian Exchange. I want the junior class to experience the importance of piracy in the scheme of trade and early democracy. If you were to teach them for 90 minutes, what would you a) discuss to cover the topic, and ;) weave into the subject to keep them interested. . .

TIA. :)

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As far as Democracy goes, the best example would be the code of conduct. Use it as an example from the way it was written to how the vote took place and each member had to sign before going on the account. Compare it to life on a navy ship of that time period and have them draw a A B list on the board with Piracy on one side and Navy Life on the other. Keep em interested by going over what type of punishments were given for breaking the rules on either ship. Bring in a piece of rope and have someone in the class unravell it into a cat of nine tails. Compare the ranks on a pirate ship to those of modern democracy. I'm starting to lose my train of thought now cause I've been drinking too much but I'll come back when I have more ideas. Hope this helps

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One thing David Cordingly's book "Under the Black Flag" talks about is the fact that often, pirates didn't plunder your average merchant vessel for "treasure"- they were taking naval stores like tar and pitch to repair their ships because they couldn't officially make port anywhere except places like Nassau and Port Royal which were known for being places pirates frequented. The significance of naval stores is not only important to the local economies of, say, my home state of North Carolina, but because of the value of goods rather than gold. Taking gold at face value is one thing- trading goods of small value to places where they are of larger value (IE the Triangle Trade) is critical to understanding the driving force of economics in piracy and maritime life.

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that apart from hollywood, what the pirates were seeking was not gold and jewels, but whatever trade goods, slaves, etc was aboard ship. patriot pirates outlines the importance of what goods the pirates brought back was to colonial economics. and how the politics were played out on an internatinal level of hide and seek. taxes and tatics.

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I'd go for focusing on the people who became pyrates and why they chose that route. Economic stress (arguably the most common reason) made many average men willing to work, turn to the sweet trade when there were no other options. Relate that back to modern pyracy in Somalia to show the connection between poverty and pyracy, the "easy-money" myth (ain't so easy once ye try it!). Stress that pyrates were after ANY marketable goods,such as silks, wool and other textiles, spices, ships stores of food and wine/rum, and not just coins and jewels and such. (Spices were often more valuable than currency). Then, have them write a letter home as a person who has just signed on with a crew, explaining to their family what drove them to make such a decision, or as a captured pyrate facing trial and the the gallows, making their last statement to the family. That's what I'd do. Hope it helps some.

Bo

Edited by Capt. Bo of the WTF co.

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that apart from hollywood, what the pirates were seeking was not gold and jewels, but whatever trade goods, slaves, etc was aboard ship. patriot pirates outlines the importance of what goods the pirates brought back was to colonial economics. and how the politics were played out on an internatinal level of hide and seek. taxes and tatics.

Don't forget fish. Calico Jack robbed fishing vessels of their catch.

Mark

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.. . have them write a letter home as a person who has just signed on with a crew, explaining to their family what drove them to make such a decision, or as a captured pyrate facing trial and the the gallows, making their last statement to the family.

Excellent idea!

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As far as Democracy goes, the best example would be the code of conduct. Use it as an example from the way it was written to how the vote took place and each member had to sign before going on the account. Compare it to life on a navy ship of that time period and have them draw a A B list on the board with Piracy on one side and Navy Life on the other. Keep em interested by going over what type of punishments were given for breaking the rules on either ship. Bring in a piece of rope and have someone in the class unravell it into a cat of nine tails. Compare the ranks on a pirate ship to those of modern democracy. I'm starting to lose my train of thought now cause I've been drinking too much but I'll come back when I have more ideas. Hope this helps

Also mention that pirates had a form of insurance. The articles usually specified lump sum payments for losing a limb or eye.

Mark

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