Cap'n Black Jack

Brewers Pitch, Pine Tar, Gum Rosin, Etc

36 posts in this topic

I am on a hunt for pine tar for pitching mugs, cups, tankards, pitchers, and all sorts of Jacks. I realize that Jas. Townsend has "Brewers Pitch", I have used it. Unfortunately what they have is yellow in colour, not dark brown or black, and it is brittle. If you drop you jack it will crack! Does anyone know here I can find the dark pitch?

Capt Black

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Would Stockholm Tar work for your application? If so, contact R&W Rope at www.rwrope.com . These folks have a great supply of rigging for traditional boats. In addition to cordage they have wood cheeked blocks, bronze fittings, winches and other hardware. There's me Tuppence, I hope it helps! Dutch "X" (his mark)

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HOLD FAST!!!!! DO NOT USE PINE TAR FOR FOOD SERVICE ITEMS!

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Not sure if that will work, I have a line on NAVY PITCH which comes in 55lb solid blocks. However I don't really need that much seeing how a pound will do 10 to 15 mugs! I'll look into it. Thanks.

Capt Black

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HOLD FAST!!!!! DO NOT USE PINE TAR FOR FOOD SERVICE ITEMS!

Can you give us a reason why? The stuff I am looking at is a 100% organic with no health warnings or anything else. I have two tankards from England with thick black pitch in them that seem to be fine, been using them for years. According to the FDA pine pitch that is 100% pine is food safe, however it cannot have additive that make it a liquid. This naval pitch seems to be the stuff i need but more research is needed. Any help would be great.

Capt Black

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pine PITCH is fine. pine TAR is caustic.

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I am on a hunt for pine tar for pitching mugs, cups, tankards, pitchers, and all sorts of Jacks. I realize that Jas. Townsend has "Brewers Pitch", I have used it. Unfortunately what they have is yellow in colour, not dark brown or black, and it is brittle. If you drop you jack it will crack! Does anyone know here I can find the dark pitch?

Capt Black

I too have used the pitch from Townsend, and never had a problem with it. I will grant you that it does have a yellowish hue, but when you apply it to leather, it darkens the leather (if the leather isn't already dyed dark), and the yellowish hue disappears.

I have yet to see anything I have made with the pitch from Townsend crack or become brittle, but then I don't still have everything I have made with it, but I hope if such a thing happened, one of the folks who bought one of my leather costrels would have let me know.

Can I ask how you are applying the pitch? I think your problem may be more one of method than material. ;)

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pine PITCH is fine. pine TAR is caustic.

Thanks. Didn't mean to sound like a bastard there, sometimes i can't help it...pirate and all...

Capt Black

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no worrys mate. i'd rather catch something like that here rather than read your obit or hear you were in the hospital. I have one of michaels costrels thats two- maybe three years old now. I've used it so much that the leather around the neck is wearing down, but the pitch is still holding strong- no repairs needed yet. I've only held water in it due to it potentially being a bear to clean. I'd be leery about puting alcohol in it, i wonder if it would break down?

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I am on a hunt for pine tar for pitching mugs, cups, tankards, pitchers, and all sorts of Jacks. I realize that Jas. Townsend has "Brewers Pitch", I have used it. Unfortunately what they have is yellow in colour, not dark brown or black, and it is brittle. If you drop you jack it will crack! Does anyone know here I can find the dark pitch?

Capt Black

I too have used the pitch from Townsend, and never had a problem with it. I will grant you that it does have a yellowish hue, but when you apply it to leather, it darkens the leather (if the leather isn't already dyed dark), and the yellowish hue disappears.

I have yet to see anything I have made with the pitch from Townsend crack or become brittle, but then I don't still have everything I have made with it, but I hope if such a thing happened, one of the folks who bought one of my leather costrels would have let me know.

Can I ask how you are applying the pitch? I think your problem may be more one of method than material. ;)

Well, I heat it until it melts, pour it in the vessel, then flip and roll. I do this as many times as needed to coat the inside. It's the method I was taught by a Scotsman, but we were using a black pitch that was a bit more pliable.

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Well, it might not be as traditional, but the method I use starts the same... But has one more step. Once coated, put the item in an oven on it's lowest heat setting for 10 to 20 minutes (time varies by thickness of pitch, heat setting of oven, and other random factors, you just gotta feel it out).. Anyways, the pitch melts into the leather, and the fused pitch/leather is both firm, hard and water proof, but not brittle. Sometimes, I may add an additional coating of pitch inside after doing the first melt into the leather if I think the item needs it.

Give that a try and let me know if it works better for you (if you have any of the Townsend pitch left to try it with).

Well, I heat it until it melts, pour it in the vessel, then flip and roll. I do this as many times as needed to coat the inside. It's the method I was taught by a Scotsman, but we were using a black pitch that was a bit more pliable.

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I use bees wax heated in as michael describes to waterproof my fire buckets.

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I'll give it a shot and let you know! Thanks

Capt Black

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well I have the can, but the warning seems to be mostly obscured by a brown sticky substance- go figure. here is what I can read though. Warning: keep out of reach of children. Cl.............. Use in we............... epeated use can sensitize skin. Do not.................flush with.................

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Hey Dutch! Does Pine TAR have spirits or linseed oil in it? I've only used it for rigging service and on long passages, put a ball of tarred marline in my clothing drawers and lockers to ward off the mildew. Very effective for the later as well! As for the Smell. I find no other fragrance near as pleasing. A.G.A.Correa, the Nautical Jewellery Maker from Maine, carried a cologne call "Marlinespike". It had a good hint of Stockholm Tar to it. Some liked it and some, not so much. You know where my sentiments lay! They no longer have "Marlinespike" but they sent me another fragrance that they still had called "Spliced". It had an equally as pleasing fragrance, just less Tarry than the "Marlinespike".

And the Fair Maid said "Oh I can't and I shan't and I won't go with you. You Tarry, Ramblin' Sailor!"

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I'm not really sure- right off hand i'd have to say spirits of some sort as the tar goes through an extraction process and as part of the magic formula we add linseed oil to it. It works wonders for keeping away moths as well. Unfortunately, it is also known to keep my lovely Grace away as well so I must go lightly but she did compromise and found me a fragrance called spiced rum that she likes the smell off. not bad, but not the same.

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My mistake. The new fragrance is called "Seized". Another favorite of mine, and it's ancient is Bay Rum. Columbus was introduced to the Bay Leaf and its many uses on his first voyage. It makes for a real soothing after shave.

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does anyone know if the "pine tar" i can get from my local feed shop for horses hooves is anywhere near to stockholm tar?

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does anyone know if the "pine tar" i can get from my local feed shop for horses hooves is anywhere near to stockholm tar?

I s far as I know, yes. If it says TAR most likely it is TAR. I do know that Stockholm Tar and Pint Tar are used interchangeably.

Capt Black

Providence Trading Company

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thank you capn...ive got to get some today and tar some line so i can wrap master crosses rigging knife...

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For Authentic Stockholm Rigging Tar as well as other Traditional Rigging supplies go to www.tarsmell.com American Rope and Tar Co.

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got a couple yards here. how much ya need? coopers has some tarred marline which would work well.

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ty dutch but i just got done..lol this stuff is great.i did the dishes and still smell it...i tarred some 48# two strand hemp i have...so i geuss it could be considered tarred marline now:)...coopers carries real marlin?id like to get my hands on some...the stuff i just did is hangin on theclothesline drying...along w the clothe i ran it through after i dipped it into the can...imma make patches from the clothe for my breeches since i tore them in dville...

(edited to tell dutch and others that my wife hates the smell...lol..so your not alone:))

Edited by adam cyphers

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i loves the smell me self, ill have to get some to use at black beards lol....on a side note i though we were doing the antler handel?...........

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went through all my antler ...couldnt use any...ill make ya another if you want...just use the other till then...

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