Red Maria

Amazing reference sites

107 posts in this topic

I second Pirate Kings site for an Archeologist view of pirate history. His site is pretty graphic intensive too (at least it was under the moniker of "pirates cove" and I link to his site on my own.... (though he has yet to return the favor ) :lol:

But my site, http://www.gentlemenoffortune.com , almost strickly deals with the GAoP in a "living History"sense. That is, it deals with clothing, equipment, and weapons (and a little bit of sailing vessels) used by pirates during the 1680ish-1725ish timeframe.

So my site is not good for finding out Blackbeard's Birthday or Anne Bonney's favorite color.

"Most" pirate sites are re-hases of each other, which shares the same info as 90% of the piracy books out there.

With books, start with Johnson's History of Pirates, that will cover most of the bases for what you want to know about the major pirate personalities.

greg aka gof

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Thanks for the information!!! I am just getting started on this subject so these websites will help out greatly!!! Thanks

:lol::o:o

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Samuel Pepys diary online

http://www.pepys.info/index.html

GoF

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Yep, this is a very cool period resource. It's where I found my documentation that Montero hats were used at sea in the GAoP... B)

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Digging through a huge hoarde of bookmarks in aa folder simply titled Piracy.(I love opening my computer and seeing that)

I found one I had forgotten about. The ships' list

Though much of it is 1800 and later, there are 18th Cen sections.

The ones I like show passenger and livestock lists and log entries

~~Charming Molly~~ What a great name for a ship - I do like it

These are great resources for period names as well. I use passenger lists to find character names when I write.

Ships list for Charming Molly ~ 1760

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I'm drowning....

But I don't mind....

I've been drifting through this glorious gluttony of all things maritime for months.

Bring a raft..

A lifeline,.......

A piece of wreckage to float on...

You'll need it

BTW many of you are boatbuilding in various degrees..yes I do read those

there is a Lion's share of links relating to everything from models, to rivercraft, to every conceivable scale. Makes me want to build one.

Pour a brandy and please enjoy..I know I do ~ Jenny~

All things Maritime

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very nice link lass, thank ye :lol:

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I'm trying to locate info - contemporary newspaper accounts - of the sinking of the JEFFERSON DAVIS, a Confederate privateering vessel, off St. Augustine, Florida, on August 16, 17, and 18, 1861.

Does any one have any idea where I might be able to access relevant old newspaper archives? :D

I've just sent a message to the St. Augustine Historical Society, also.

Capt. William

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I would try a place like http://www.newspaperarchive.com -- it has historic newspapers dating back to 1759.

Good luck!

Hurricane

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Aye tis a shame more old maps aren't being reproduced for the public. Some of those maps on the link would be great to have copies of them! :lol::blink::lol:

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Those are great maps! Thanks for the link. <_<

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not at all but those are world maps or Europe what was presented here were more like the sailing charts of American coastal waters from the period ...I myself would love to have copies of period charts from the Carribean as well; showing soundings and shoals etc. world maps are fine but how many of those can you chart a course by

06_01_001225.MEDIUM.jpg

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I could be wrong, but I though that Manhattan was available - but I don't know if it's for sailing.

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This Captain Twill forum is the only one I really read here, as I'm not terribly interested in pirate history. I prefer basic nautical history, particularly that of the 19th to very early 20th centuries. In doing some research, I discovered that the National Maritime History Society has opened a discussion forum on their wonderful website. Unfortunately, its so new I'm the only one who has posted so far. :lol: Even if you're not interested in the forums themselves, do yourself a favor and check out the educational tidbits on the site.

NMHS Forums

Richard

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I posted this elsewhere but thought it would be better under Captain Twill.

Here's another life sucker for you all!

It's the Dictionary of Trade Goods - 1550 - 1820.

http://www.british-history.ac.uk/source.aspx?pubid=739

4,000 entries about trade and retail things in every day life.

An sample entry for the ladies.

Shift

An article of APPAREL; a body garment of LINEN, COTTON or the like and in early use applied indifferently to men's and women's underclothing but subsequently to a woman only. During the seventeenth century it began to replace the earlier name of SMOCK, apparently because it was seen as a more 'delicate' expression. In the nineteenth the garment was again renamed from the same motive, as a 'chemise'.

One retailer had 'A p'cell of shift Buttons' [inventories (1690)]. The term does not appear in the OED online, but presumable a shift button was similar to a SHIRT BUTTON, and was designed to fasten a shift at the neck.

Instructions on how to cut out a shift economically using only 2 ELL of HOLLAND instead of the usual 2 Ell ΒΌ were given in an anonymous pamphlet dated 1695 and entitled the 'Way to save Wealth' [Anon (1695)]. It is noticeable that SCISSORS were needed very little in this operation.

OED online earliest date of use: 1598

Found described as FINE, FLAXEN, GIRL, OLD, READY MADE Found describing BUTTON Found made of CALICO, HOLLAND, TEAR OF HEMP, WOOL

Found in units of DOZEN

Sources: Acts, Diaries, Inventories (mid-period), Inventories (late), Newspapers, Tradecards.

References: Anon (1695).

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i knew it!!! airguns were around!!!! so there- i'm off to go make one this very second. the rest of you can continue to have the doglock, slowmatch, flintlock debate. I have my proof! ....well ok not really.

wow thats an intersting read. I've found a few things on that site as well, but had not run across that particular book yet. thanks for sharing. i think that is going to be my weekend read if its slow at work.

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This may or may not be have been posted here before, but I felt compelled to share it with you. If you follow this link and download the .PDF available in the upper right-hand corner, you will have access to 484 pages of absolute piratical kick*ssery. It's not just Esquemalin's account, but includes Basil Ringrose's book and a couple others. An out of print gem.

Raiding! Arson! Grenades! Muskets! Melee Combat! Boarding Actions & Amphibious Ops! Plunder! MOAR Arson! (They seemed to like burning stuff down to show the Spanish Empire how annoyed they were with it.) Enjoy!

http://books.google.com/books?id=sKNQZfTl_...qpoyNBg#PPA2,M1

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I love this database!

I have been swimming in it throughout the year. It wonderfully searchable, and it has a nice summation of the history of sentencing and punishment.

My favorite part though is the detail that comes with so many of the cases. And it seems that perps have always been a little slow.

"No, it was a guy that just looked like me. I was chasing him when this other guy grabbed me." B)

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Hey thanks for posting! I used to go there often but lost the link when I had to reinstall windows some time back. It's a GREAT site!

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Do naught know if this has been posted before, pretty cool actually as it marks all the known locations of REAL pirate activity with hot spots you can click for details (kinda like th' 'Mark You Location' type mapping):

ICC Live Piracy Map

...perhaps worthy o' a sticky marker?

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