callenish gunner

Dutch oven recipes

31 posts in this topic

This has always been a camp favourite:

MEAT PIE

Crust;

* 3 3/4 cups all-purpose flour

* 1/2 teaspoon salt

* 1-1/2 cup lard or shortening, chilled

* 9 tablespoons ice water

Filling:

3 lbs. ground meat

3 lbs. grated potatoes

3 lbs. finely chopped onions

1 Tbs red pepper flakes

6 cloves of crushed garlic

salt and pepper to taste

DIRECTIONS

1. Whisk the flour and salt together in a large size bowl. With a pastry blender or two forks, cut in the cold lard/shortening until the mixture resembles coarse crumbs. Drizzle 2 to 3 tablespoons ice water over flour. Toss mixture with a fork to moisten, adding more water a few drops at a time until the dough comes together.

2. Gently gather dough particles together into a ball. Wrap in plastic wrap, and chill for at least 30 minutes before rolling.

3. Divide the dough into nearly 2/3 to 1/3 Roll out dough, Take the larger piece first and put in a large ( I use a 14" cast iron dutch oven) dutch oven. Fill with meat filling then cover with the smaller circle of dough, pierce with a knife several places and bake (surrounded and covered with coals) until the crust is a deep golden brown.

Sevres 12 hungry mates

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Thanks callenish....its funny that you post this....for i just got a dutch oven from a friend of mine....i should try this out YYAAAAYYY

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Thanks callenish....its funny that you post this....for i just got a dutch oven from a friend of mine....i should try this out YYAAAAYYY

Our family has had a meat pie from way back that is a little bit different. it is layered.

first layer placed on the pie dough is thinly sliced potato, second layer is thinly sliced onion, third layer is thinly sliced carrot, fourth layer is thinly sliced roast beef (leftovers) and the fifth and last layer is thinly sliced tomato. each layer is lightly seasoned with some salt & pepper and a very light dusting of flour to help make the gravy. After you have one full 5 ingredient layer done, you start over again, and again, until the pie is as high as you want it, then you cover it with the second pie dough, give a couple of slices through to let the steam out and cook until knife tender. even better the second day, if there is any leftover. ;)

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thanks for the variation halfshell! i must say, that sounds both tasty and EXTREAMLY filling(so much crust)......for some reason i feel like i may have tried a similar dish....I shall definitely have to make this one too!

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not so much crust, only the bottom and the top, the layers are all vegetable & meat, usually three of the "5" making a total of 15 layers of the veg. & meat between the two crusts.

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Thanks callenish....its funny that you post this....for i just got a dutch oven from a friend of mine....i should try this out YYAAAAYYY

Our family has had a meat pie from way back that is a little bit different. it is layered.

first layer placed on the pie dough is thinly sliced potato, second layer is thinly sliced onion, third layer is thinly sliced carrot, fourth layer is thinly sliced roast beef (leftovers) and the fifth and last layer is thinly sliced tomato. each layer is lightly seasoned with some salt & pepper and a very light dusting of flour to help make the gravy. After you have one full 5 ingredient layer done, you start over again, and again, until the pie is as high as you want it, then you cover it with the second pie dough, give a couple of slices through to let the steam out and cook until knife tender. even better the second day, if there is any leftover. ;)

Well sir you might have to let us see this dish you have mentioned...that or give the recipe to Lady Brower...sounds fantastic lol

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The one I posted is a very traditional Scottish Meat Pie, there isn't any gravy per se. Often it would be served with either a hunter sauce or HP sauce (or other steak sauce)

Hunter Sauce:

Ingredients;

1/2 cup apple butter

1/2 cup tomato paste (small can)

1 cup of port wine

2 TBS butter (unsalted)

1 tsp ginger

1/2 tsp ground cloves

1 TBS Worcestershire sauce

1/2 lb. thinly sliced mushrooms (optional)

Directions;

Melt the butter in a sauce pan, add mushrooms and sautee if you choose or, just add the tomato and apple butter, Worcestershire and stir until well blended add spices and finally stir in the port until smooth.

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DINNER AT GUNNERS!!

then we move to

DINNER AT HALF SHELLS!!

i think i am just goingot do this in the oven here for dinner soon! yah all got me drooling!!

and thanks for the recipes!!

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I have to agree. I was reading this yesterday, and had to settle for pizza for dinner. Cal's recipe just sounds so dang good! :D

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Any and all would be welcome for dinner just give a quick PM ahead of time to give me time to lay in provisions ....all I have to ask is that ye leave your curs & mousers in the land sloop as m' landlord gets rather testy about strange critters at the house.... :D:D;) Any excuse for a house party!!!!

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I've posted this on Living HX, Here it is for the rest of ye:

Here's my favorite. We call it Cherokee Chicken at my house.

2-3 lbs Chicken pieces (I prefer thighs. They're cheap and only have one bone)

Salt and Pepper to taste

2-3 bunches of scallions, trimmed so that there is an inch or two of green on the top

At least a dozen mushrooms

28 oz can of whole tomatoes

A bunch of coarsely chopped dill

2 tbs butter

Lightly salt and pepper the chicken pieces.

Place half in the bottom of a Dutch oven.

Arrange half the scallions and mushrooms on the chicken.

Spoon half the tomatoes on top.

Sprinkle half the dill over this.

Dot with 1 tbs butter.

Make a second layer with the remaining ingredients.

Cover, squashing the tomatoes, and bake at low heat for 2 hours.

Uncover and cook another 2 hours, stirring occasionally.

I like to serve this over long grain and wild rice, spooning the juices over all. Corn bread goes great with this. This recipe works well in a casserole dish in a conventional oven, as well.

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Thanks mates, this was a great find. We have just got authorized to start cooking at Fort Matanzas and are planning on replacing the existing Dutch oven with a new one. The question is what size oven? I was planning on a 2-quart one but it sounds like that might be a bit small.

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I have an 8 quart to feed my forces...

My other one is a 4 quart I think, and that one is just never big enough for anything other than veggie sides. But then again, I'm usually feeding more than a few hungry pirates...

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Lady Brower, you need to post the recipe for the two hens you baked yesterday in Albany. That was scrumptious.

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heres one for beer bread

3 cups self-rising flour

2 tbsp sugar

1 11- or 12-ounce can or bottle of beer (any kind)

Combine all of the dry ingredients in a mixing bowl and add the beer. Mix together for a bit

Toss the dough into the Dutch oven

Dutch oven should be around around 350 degrees

bake for about an hour and serve hot

also one that usually goes over real well

these are not meant to be exact measurments but it gives a good general idea

Gumbo:

1/2 cups Medium Dark Roux,

1 diced onion

1 cup diced celery (about 4-5 stalks)

1 diced green bell pepper

1-2 finely chopped garlic cloves

2 quarts stock chicken or shrimp

1 pound sausage

2 bay leaves

salt and pepper

2 pounds medium shrimp, peeled

1/2 pound lump crab meat, (optional)

1/3 cup green onion tops, chopped

1/2 cup coarsely chopped parsley leaves

2 tablespoons chopped fresh thyme leaves

1 tablespoon chopped fresh basil leaves

1/2 cup file powder, or to taste

brown onions, garlic, and celery set to the side

take 2 tbs oil and 1 tbs flour and make a roux if it turns the least bit black start over

add stock and vegtables together and boil for about 30 min

in another pan i usually brown the sausage and throw it in after the 30 min is up

add salt and pepper to taste

add spices except for the file

simmer for about 2hrs

add the shrimp and crab meat the last 15 min of simmering

use the File to thicken but never bring the gumbo to aboil after file is added

serve over rice with either cornbread or fried bread and you have one heck of a meal

Edited by onus-one-eye

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Hmm... a few recipes I have that I'm eager to attempt with in a dutch oven. In due time, I suppose. One was ratatouille, another was bacon-leek-tomato creamed gravy with chicken and bread. Plus multitudes of others. If I try them, they turn out well, shall post them here. :unsure:

~Lady B

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Here be a link to some tasty receipts, not all PC, but I did say tasty!

http://www.macscouter.com/Cooking/DutchOven.asp

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Ingredients:

a chicken

saffron

1 large handful of parsley, sage, rosemary and thyme, altogether now.......Are you going...ehem (or other aromatic green herbs).

Bottle of reasonable white wine

cauldron with lid and sticks or skewers

Sit your pot on it's legs

pour wine into pot add half the herbs

arrange your sticks/skewers in a grid making a platform above the wine

Put the other half of the herbs inside the chicken.

Paint the outside of the chicken with saffron water - saffron strands dried and ground made up to solution with warm water

Put the chicken on the sticks over the wine - without it touching the wine

Lid the pot and seal it with a little dough if you can or put a weight on the lid

Put y'pot on the fire and steam the chicken for the same time it would take to roast.

The herby wine becomes a good base for a sauce.

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Ingredients:

a chicken

saffron

1 large handful of parsley, sage, rosemary and thyme, altogether now.......Are you going...ehem (or other aromatic green herbs).

Bottle of reasonable white wine

cauldron with lid and sticks or skewers

Sit your pot on it's legs

pour wine into pot add half the herbs

arrange your sticks/skewers in a grid making a platform above the wine

Put the other half of the herbs inside the chicken.

Paint the outside of the chicken with saffron water - saffron strands dried and ground made up to solution with warm water

Put the chicken on the sticks over the wine - without it touching the wine

Lid the pot and seal it with a little dough if you can or put a weight on the lid

Put y'pot on the fire and steam the chicken for the same time it would take to roast.

The herby wine becomes a good base for a sauce.

That looks gorgeous! I'll have to give this a go at the next event. Do you have pics of yours to share?

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I am having problems getting the Dutch into the oven. Are you supposed to kill him first? :rolleyes:

Hurricane

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Ingredients:

a chicken

saffron

1 large handful of parsley, sage, rosemary and thyme, altogether now.......Are you going...ehem (or other aromatic green herbs).

Bottle of reasonable white wine

cauldron with lid and sticks or skewers

Sit your pot on it's legs

pour wine into pot add half the herbs

arrange your sticks/skewers in a grid making a platform above the wine

Put the other half of the herbs inside the chicken.

Paint the outside of the chicken with saffron water - saffron strands dried and ground made up to solution with warm water

Put the chicken on the sticks over the wine - without it touching the wine

Lid the pot and seal it with a little dough if you can or put a weight on the lid

Put y'pot on the fire and steam the chicken for the same time it would take to roast.

The herby wine becomes a good base for a sauce.

That looks gorgeous! I'll have to give this a go at the next event. Do you have pics of yours to share?

Eeeep this is putting me head above the parapet but her are some pics of the very first time me and me chums tried it waaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaay back in the early 16thC ;o)

http://www.flickr.co...57605997771339/ It's become a regular at home using a steamer rack and a wok with a lid.

The bronze cauldrens we use at work are fantastic for cooking in, much 'faster' than iron and they don't sadden your food, give it that slight grey tinge that cast iron does, BUT they do need proper cleaning with mucho elbow grease and scourers.

Edited by Grymm

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Eeeep this is putting me head above the parapet but her are some pics of the very first time me and me chums tried it waaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaay back in the early 16thC ;o)

http://www.flickr.co...57605997771339/ It's become a regular at home using a steamer rack and a wok with a lid.

The bronze cauldrens we use at work are fantastic for cooking in, much 'faster' than iron and they don't sadden your food, give it that slight grey tinge that cast iron does, BUT they do need proper cleaning with mucho elbow grease and scourers.

Ah, that's quite useful. Thanks. What was used to spread the saffron on the bird in the kitchens at HCP? I'd use a pastry brush at home, but it looks like a little wad of something I can't identify in the pic. And using the pastry trick is a good one, especially for pot lids that don't seal well. Will file that away for future use *G*

I learned the hard way about iron pots saddening the color of food. Made the mistake of making my standard lentil soup in one, the camp name for it that weekend was crank case stew, as it looked like something you'd drain out of your car. Smelled and tasted wonderful, looked absolutely awful! I had used a (different) iron pot to dye with, so I should have been aware of the saddening issue, but it didn't translate to the part of my brain that cooks food. Sigh. Live and learn, eh?

So I take it that cooking this recipe in an iron pot, even just steaming it that way, would have some impact on the color? How interesting. Gotta start saving for bronze!

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Ah, that's quite useful. Thanks. What was used to spread the saffron on the bird in the kitchens at HCP? I'd use a pastry brush at home, but it looks like a little wad of something I can't identify in the pic. And using the pastry trick is a good one, especially for pot lids that don't seal well. Will file that away for future use *G*

We bodged a 'brush' from a knackered old bit of linen cloth rescued from the scraps we use to make charcloth.

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Ah, that's quite useful. Thanks. What was used to spread the saffron on the bird in the kitchens at HCP? I'd use a pastry brush at home, but it looks like a little wad of something I can't identify in the pic. And using the pastry trick is a good one, especially for pot lids that don't seal well. Will file that away for future use *G*

We bodged a 'brush' from a knackered old bit of linen cloth rescued from the scraps we use to make charcloth.

Thanks! It was really hard to see that it was linen from the pic, almost looked like thick cheesecloth. Since I have more linen scraps than I'm likely ever to use for charcloth, I'll keep that in mind *g*

I just priced saffron yesterday, it comes out to around $350 an ounce. Maybe I should lock up the bottle from the Chinese market, it was cheaper there *g*

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On this side of the pond "Dutch Oven" is a euphemism for when ones breaks wind in bed then pulls the duvet over the wife's head. Oddly, I've never met a girl who found it funny, they keep calling me puerile! :lol:

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