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Niko

Loyalist Arms 17th Century shell guard cutlass

15 posts in this topic

I have never bought one, but here be a link to a review of a similar weapon.

But truth be told I am not even sure if it's still available.

0000A.jpg

*photo by Gene George

Click here ye rum soaked bastard!

Weight: 2 pounds 2 ounces

Overall length: 33 inches

Blade length: 28 inches

Blade width: 1.5 inches

Fullers: 14.75" and 14" long

Shell: Clamshell approximately 5" long x 4" wide

Guard: Recurved quillions 5.5" wide x 5.5" long

Grip and pommel length: 5.5 inches

Point of Balance: 6.25 inches from guard

Center of Percussion: ~20 inches from guard

* review by Gene George

Edited by CaptainSatan

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That sword looks good but its not for any kind of use. The tang is a tiny little rod that wouldnt hold up at all. So if what you want is a costume piece then this is a great deal but for any use I would try to find something with a full tang.

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That sword looks to be a replica of a specific Dutch Cutlass dated 1763 page 76, bottom of page, that is illustrated in Boarder’s Away Vol. 1. However, the style goes into the 1600’s per the book.

The scabbard looks to be more of a machete cover than a sword scabbard. It might be the scabbard is why Loyalist is selling this sword for $100 cheaper then Windlass which has a more sword style looking scabbard? But then again when I look at the cross guard on the Windlass in Captain Satan's post and then look closely at the Loyalist picture it appears that there maybe a significant difference in width of the cross guard, with the Windlass being significantly larger. Then again, might just be the photo or my bad eyes.

Note- This sword (and the Windlass) have a separate cross guard, and shell guard that slide into place vs. in the original that it’s my understanding were not separate and were actually part of the sword. Boarder’s Away doesn’t speak to this point, its conjecture on my part they were all part of the blade based on what I have seen constructed. If I am off base here, please feel free to correct me.

Edited by Graydog

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That sword looks good but its not for any kind of use. The tang is a tiny little rod that wouldnt hold up at all.

I would try to find something with a full tang.

Many period weapons have puny little tangs (lol). I am amazed that they have held up in battle at all.

The Japanese had the right idea.

One of these days I am going to attach a late 17th century English basket hilt to a slightly shortened katana blade so that I don't

have to worry about such things.

Edited by CaptainSatan

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That sword looks good but its not for any kind of use. The tang is a tiny little rod that wouldnt hold up at all.

I would try to find something with a full tang.

Many period weapons have puny little tangs (lol). I am amazed that they have held up in battle at all.

The Japanese had the right idea.

One of these days I am going to attach a late 17th century English basket hilt to a slightly shortened katana blade so that I don't

have to worry about such things.

I have a friend that mounts katana blades in basket hilts. They rock! Either way I would fight on stage with a crowd with a rat tail tang... Not a good idea.

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I have a friend that mounts katana blades in basket hilts. They rock! Either way I would fight on stage with a crowd with a rat tail tang.

Any pics or links to your friends work?

Most people associate pierced baskets as Scottish thing. But they were quite popular with the English as well.

I have never seen a cutlass with a pierced basket. Other than in the movie Cutthroat Island. But I'd

still love to have one for my Hollywood Ren faire persona :D

An X-ray tech friend of mine and I took photos and radiographed some private collections several years ago and we

shocked at the number of flimsy rat tail tangs that we found.

Edited by CaptainSatan

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What's up with baltimoreknife.com? I got an attack site warning from Google when I clicked on the link

Diagnostic page for baltimoreknife.com

What is the current listing status for baltimoreknife.com?

Site is listed as suspicious - visiting this web site may harm your computer.

Part of this site was listed for suspicious activity 2 time(s) over the past 90 days.

I broke out my stunt computer and visited the site and my virus software blocked a virus.

McAfee has automatically blocked and removed a Trojan.

About this Trojan

Detected: Obfuscated Script.f.gen (Trojan)

Edited by CaptainSatan

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[

Most people associate pierced baskets as Scottish thing. But they were quite popular with the English as well.

I have never seen a cutlass with a pierced basket.

Do a search on Sinclair Sabers. They were a type of infantry hanger from the late 16th, early 17th centuries, Named, supposedly, after a Scottish captain who commanded a mercenary force. Years ago, Museum Reps had one in their catalogue, when they were doing better work. I wish there were more out there. As a late 16th c persona, I'd like a couple of my crew to have them. I made mine by attaching an old schiavona hilt to a cutlass blade. The extra weight of the hilt gives a better balance to the piece and makes it much easier to snap around.

http://images.google.com/imgres?imgurl=htt...sa%3DN%26um%3D1

On the original question, I have a Loyalist Arms blunerbuss that I've been very happy with, but I know nothing about their blades.

Hawkyns

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Here is the first Sinclair from the link Hawkyns posted:95.jpg

And the description: Named for a Scots officer who led a failed expedition on the continent this short infantry cutting sword has a hilt of very complex form with twisted bars and a large plate guard with flutes. Wire wrap and collars on the hilt are replacements but otherwise original. While these swords tended to be somewhat crude as they were produced in large quantities for the average soldier this example is fairly finished and elaborate. Late 16th or 17th century.

Here is the second picture from the link that Hawkyns posted: 91.jpg

From the description: This sword is of the simple crude form of these infantry cutting swords. A simple two plate guard and rough forged slightly S form quillions make up the hilt. All the weight is in the front of the blade. Extensive parrying cuts throughout this piece. Late 16th or 17th century.

Photo credits to: The Mercenary's Tailor Armoury

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Walter Matthau had a cutlass with a Scottish-style basket in the movie "Pirates." I'm thinking of cobbling one together with a Cold Steel Scottish basket and an old MRL cutlass blade I have. Should look stylish.

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Scottish Grenadiers used a basket-hilted hanger/cutlass beginning around 1704 in both steel and brass mounts ...From some of the swords in the G. Neuman Collection ....I'll try to get some photos of them in a couple of weeks

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I'll have to agree with Petee, I've got one and it is the best balanced, non-custom, sword I've purchased.

shellcut.JPG

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