michaelsbagley

Hardenning (re-hardenning) your frizzen

57 posts in this topic

Yeah im still learning about the flintlock, but i think it was the bad info that got me.

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..... And since the re-hardenning of the frizzen it is behaving wonderfully! I still think I might need to stone the sear spring down (trigger pull is a bit heavy, and it is chipping out flints quicker than my other flinters).

Heavy trigger pulls usually can best be fixed by re-working the tumbler notches. The sear spring is usually only part of the problem. Could be a combination of both. As a test, try temporarily removing the sear spring completely, and see how it feels. It will give you an idea how much pressure is required to release it. Trigger pull is also very much effected by the location of the pin that the trigger pivots on.

Rapid wearing or breakage of flints is usually caused by overly strong frizzen springs. Many of the India made pieces are guilty of this. It can be remedied with a bit of careful work.

>>>> Cascabel

Cascabel,

So what can be done with a overly strong Frizzen Spring? Like M Bagley, I have a early doglock musket. I too think the frizzen came to me not hardened properly. I am planning on doing the tin can in a fire thing this weekend, but I am also interested in knowing how to lighten a frizzen spring.

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..... And since the re-hardenning of the frizzen it is behaving wonderfully! I still think I might need to stone the sear spring down (trigger pull is a bit heavy, and it is chipping out flints quicker than my other flinters).

Heavy trigger pulls usually can best be fixed by re-working the tumbler notches. The sear spring is usually only part of the problem. Could be a combination of both. As a test, try temporarily removing the sear spring completely, and see how it feels. It will give you an idea how much pressure is required to release it. Trigger pull is also very much effected by the location of the pin that the trigger pivots on.

Rapid wearing or breakage of flints is usually caused by overly strong frizzen springs. Many of the India made pieces are guilty of this. It can be remedied with a bit of careful work.

>>>> Cascabel

Cascabel,

So what can be done with a overly strong Frizzen Spring? Like M Bagley, I have a early doglock musket. I too think the frizzen came to me not hardened properly. I am planning on doing the tin can in a fire thing this weekend, but I am also interested in knowing how to lighten a frizzen spring.

To begin with, the way to test a frizzen for hardness is to take a SHARP file, and try to file across the face. Don't be afraid to bear down hard. The file won't "grab" or cut at all if the frizzen is hard enough, but merely "skid" across the face. The test only requires one stroke. If the file digs in AT ALL, then you need to re-harden. If the file simply skids across the face, then frizzen hardness is not your problem !! Always check in this fashion BEFORE deciding that it is not properly hardened. You should also check a re-hardening job in the same fashion.

Overly strong springs are typical of India-made guns. They can be dealt with in a couple of different ways, depending on the individual situation. Basically, if you look at your spring, you will see that it is much wider than it needs to be to start with (usually). It really needs to be no wider than to give the toe of the frizzen a place to ride. It usually is also considerably THICKER than necessary also. Each issue needs to be dealt with separately.

Narrowing the spring reduces the strength, because of course, you are removing metal. Don't go too far in narrowing the spring. Don't forget, you can't put the metal back on !! Reducing the thickness also reduces the strength, but also imparts more FLEXIBILITY. If you only make it narrower, it will still most likely be too stiff, and may break at the bend. Reducing the thickness should be done with the end result being a GRADUAL taper with the rear being the thinnest point. The area of re-work only needs to be the portion of the spring to the rear of the anchor pin, as that is the only part that flexes.

It can be done a couple of ways depending on available tooling. Filing by hand works nicely, or you can use a grinder, but avoid getting it too hot and effecting the temper. If you choose to grind it, holding it in your bare fingers will let you know if it is getting too hot !! Watch the color, and if you turn it blue, you will most likely have to re-temper it, so be careful, work slowly, and dip it in water often to cool it. Keep all filing and grinding marks LENGTHWISE to the spring, so as not to induce cracking and breakage during use. Polish out all tool marks, so as not to have stress points, which can start a crack.

How much to reduce the width and thickness remains a "judgement call". Don't try the shortcut of over bending the spring, as that usually results in breakage, or rendering it too weak to work properly.

>>>>> Cascabel

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Thanks for the info! Good stuff. I tried the frizzen wrapped in leather in a tin can thing last night. Sadly it didn't work for me. Perhaps I didn't get it hot enough. Will try again tonight and report back.

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When I did mine (leather wraped in the tin can to re-harden my frizzen) I used a bunch chunks of scrap leather wrapped all around the frizzen, I then put it into a tin can, folded over the top, and crimped the edes.... I put this into the center of the fire for one and a half hours. at the end of that time, using tongs I pulled out the burnted up can and droped it into a bucket of water.... the can was easy enough to pull apart once it cooled...

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I did two frizzens at one firing.. The bundle of leather was hard to stuff in the can but After twisting and turning it all went in nicely, leaving very little space inside the krimpt can.. I kept the can in the middle of the hottest part of the fire for 1hour and 10 minutes.

My guns are from Middlesex... I went and decided to try this after having soooo much frustration with my Blunderbuss at PiP.

Edited by oderlesseye

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Don't forget that the guns we get from India are not the best they make, the "shooters they produce for the UK must be proved and tested to enter those markets as "live" guns. Not everyone enjoys the freedoms we have here. Some dealers are getting the idea across to the makers to manufacture thr "real" thing without a vent, but they seem tobe loath to sell their best for less. I have several 1st model brown bess muskets and have removed the breach plugs and found the workmanship on the plug and the bore to be of very high quality. Just wish someone would ship them some decent black walnut.

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