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Commodore Swab

Flintlock Spring

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I was just wondering if anyone would know how to build a spring for a flintlock. Can I cast it in steel and then have it tempered to make it spring steel? Does it need to be made as a flat piece then bent 180 degrees? What steel do I need? Can I cut something like a car spring down then heat and bend it and retemper it?

Since this is a home built lock I can't simply substitute in a spring from another lock

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I was just wondering if anyone would know how to build a spring for a flintlock. Can I cast it in steel and then have it tempered to make it spring steel? Does it need to be made as a flat piece then bent 180 degrees? What steel do I need? Can I cut something like a car spring down then heat and bend it and retemper it?

Since this is a home built lock I can't simply substitute in a spring from another lock

Boy, you are not asking much are you? I would say, if you have to ask, then the job may be a bit beyond the scope of your experience to accomplish.

Springs can be forged or cast out of the proper steel, I have no idea if using a small piece of a car's spring would work, as the applications are different and may require a different alloy of steel. As to the tempering process, if you get to the point of actually having a properly formed spring blank to temper, (you speak of casting the spring in steel like it is a walk in the park, it's not that easy) the following site may give you some insight to the various methods.

http://www.ctmuzzleloaders.com/ctml_experi.../tempering.html

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Blank springs can be had from Dixie Gun Works, and other suppliers of black powder gun parts. You can also get strips of spring steel in various thicknesses to make springs from scratch. The blanks come in several sizes, and are already formed to the basic shape. The anchor area is left oversize, so that the anchor pin can be located according to the location of the hole in the lockplate. They need quite a bit of work to complete the fitting operation, including possibly thinning down as required. Sometimes it's easier to make one from scratch, but if one of the blank springs comes close to what you need, they can be a time saver. In any event, you will need to do the heat treating after getting it to fit properly.

The job is not very suited to the inexperienced.

Properly warned, sez I......

>>>> Cascabel

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Casting it is not a problem nor is making a pattern. I have a friend that can temper/heat treat it. My thoughts along a car spring were more a source for a good steel to cast. Of course I may just send the parts out and have them cast by somebody else. The Viceroy and I will be playing with thisproject when he gets back into town.

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This book available from Track of the Wolf and other places online is both cheap, small, easy to read, and has a ton of good information on making springs for muzzle-loaders of all varieties.

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