Cheeky Actress

How will ye Die?!

49 posts in this topic

Was doing a bit of research and found this instead.

I saw the words Rum and Monkey....of course I had to look!

Kill Me! Early Modern Style!

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Alright!

No wise remarks from ANYONE...

(I should have known B) )

This is it. You know where you would have lived, what you would have worn, even what sort of dowry you would have given your daughters. And now you know how you would have died.

Syphalis: At least it's fashionable!

B)B)

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Ravished by mercenaries. At least it wasn't child birth.

Hey, no fair! I wanted to do the ravishing! B)

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You made it past the childhood diseases, the religious wars, the epidemics, and your neighbors' sheep dogs. Die peacefully in your bed.

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Stood a little too close to the fire with those long skirts. At least it wasn't childbirth.

I knew it. Must be, because I accidently lit my hair at a candle once. LOL

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Congratulations! You managed to pass as a man in the army, and died like one, too, of lead poisoning from a bullet.

Heh - sounds about right.

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'Stood a little too close to the fire with those long skirts. At least it wasn't childbirth'.

Always knew I was hot stuff!

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Burned at the stake. Not just for the ladies.

I see a theme going on....we are all hot stuff. B)

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Anemia. The cure was worse than the disease.

Not far from the truth now either. B)

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Stood a little too close to the fire with those long skirts. At least it wasn't childbirth.

I knew it. Must be, because I accidently lit my hair at a candle once. LOL

so did I! It was when my step dad proposed to my mom B)

how about your incident?

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Mine states I shall die in my bed... but actually I will die of laughter because of Cheeky's answer!! B)B)

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WOOT! :P:P

"Congratulations! You managed to pass as a man in the army, and died like one, too, of lead poisoning from a bullet."

So far I am in good company!

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This is it. You know where you would have lived, what you would have worn, even what sort of dowry you would have given your daughters. And now you know how you would have died.

Ummmm... Not sure if thats a good thing.

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Mine states I shall die in my bed... but actually I will die of laughter because of Cheeky's answer!! :P:P

Die in bed, Captain Sterling?!

Hmm? :P

With your reputation with the ladies...I find that very ironic, don't you?

As for my answer...ya, laugh it up, Feather Boiy!

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WOOT!  :P   :P

"Congratulations! You managed to pass as a man in the army, and died like one, too, of lead poisoning from a bullet."

So far I am in good company!

In good company, indeed! I also have:

Congratulations! You managed to pass as a man in the army, and died like one, too, of lead poisoning from a bullet.

Come on, girls, lets start our own army!

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Apropos of nothing...

"So, you're the new managing director of Empire Chemicals?"

"Yes."

"What happened to Williamson?"

"Williamson? Oh, yes! He died rather suddenly poor chap."

(My mind is just a tangled series of useless cartoon and movie quotes...)

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Starvation! hmmm...musta been marooned, since Ransom wouldn't have married a farmer! :lol:

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You made it past the childhood diseases, the religious wars, the epidemics, and your neighbors' sheep dogs. Die peacefully in your bed.

Now how'd that happen???

Alright, redid it with m' given name...

This is it. You know where you would have lived, what you would have worn, even what sort of dowry you would have given your daughters. And now you know how you would have died.

Died like a man (i.e. lead poisoning from a bullet)

Hmmmm...

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A lot of people seem to be dying from bullet wounds. This little program must not be very well based in history, at least regards pirates and seamen, as this was not a common way for such people to die.

“Battle fatalities on navy ships…counted for only a fraction of the mortality rate, particularly on tropical stations, and many of those who did die as a result of enemy action succumbed not because their wounds were mortal, but because they became infected.” Joan Druett, Rough Medicine: Surgeon’s at Sea in the Age of Sail, p. 133

“Engagements at sea, though catching the eye of the historian and vital for the successful confrontation of the enemy were, from a medical standpoint, the least onerous of the surgeon’s duties because they occurred relatively rarely.” (Dr. Kathleen Harland, “Naval Medical Care 1620-1770,” J Royal Medical Service 2005,  p. 64)

During battle, it wasn't usually bullets or cannon balls that caused most of the carnage, either.

“By far the greatest cause of death or mutilation in a firefight between the ships of the period were flying splinters. Naval surgeons found that close fought actions produced less casualties than actions conducted between opposing ships at a distance. In close fought actions, the velocity of cannon balls was so great that in penetrating the side of a ship a clean aperture was produced with few splinters. But a spent ball, traveling from a distance usually produced a jagged aperture with numerous deadly splinters by which more men were killed or wounded than by the ball itself.” (Tony Harrison, “Nelson and his Navy – Surgery in the Royal Navy,” The Historical Maritime Society Website)

Far more seamen died from disease than ever died in battle, though. Much is contained in the various naval records about disease - usually referred to as fluxes or fevers - from the period but not many statistics. Reliable record counts don't appear until about the mid 17th century, but the treatment and understanding of diseases changed little from the 15th through the early 18th centuries, so the following data is probably indicative of mortality by disease among seamen.

“The House of Commons reported in 1762 that of 185,000 men in the sea services during the late war (against the French and Spanish), over 130,000 perished by disease and two-thirds of that number died of scurvy.” (Zachary B. Friedenberg, Medicine Under Sail, p. 53)

“…James Lind, the first physician at Haslar [hospital], in which he summarized the cases admitted during his first two years, 1758-1760:

Fevers  2,174

Scurvy  1,146

Consumptions 360

Rheumatisms 350

Fluxes  245

          ____

Total  4,275

(Dr. Kathleen Harland, “Naval Medical Care 1620-1770 Saving the Seamen: Naval medical care in the Pre-Nelson era, 1620-1770,” J Royal Medical Service 2005, p. 77)

For actual deaths occurring at sea during the GAoP, the most prominent killers seemed to be scurvy, followed by yellow fever, malaria and dysentery. In fact, I have not come across a single incident of death by lead poising yet. Although they may not have known to account for it that way. :lol:

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I put in my real name and got:

Ravished by mercenaries. At least it wasn't child birth.

No surprise there..... ;)

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Mine said:

Died during Vulcan Mindmeld.

I am not sure I was on the right page? :lol:

-Greydog

:lol:

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Fancy that?!?

I was ravished by mercenaries!

Lucky gal that I am! :lol:

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