Rats

Uniform colors?

258 posts in this topic

There's actually a lengthy discussion on this called Uniform Colors? although it doesn't focus specifically on officers. I can merge this thread with that one if you like. Or not. Your call.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Mission. You can please. It would make sense

just more paintings


And I almost forget him

Sir Cloudesley Shovell, 1650-1707 picture circa 1702-1705

The coat here is nearly identical to those used by Vice-Admiral Sir John Leake, Admiral Sir Chaloner Ogle, Vice-Admiral Sir Stafford Fairborne and Captain Robert Harland

large.jpg

Here is one red and blue officer 1730-40

large.jpg

Blue and red seemed to be a trend at least in 1725-1740s See also http://collections.rmg.co.uk/collections/objects/14398.html and http://collections.rmg.co.uk/collections/objects/14328.html and Fitzroy Henry Lee (below in the earlier post)

But for one blue officer there seems to be at least one or two brown and red ones

like here (similar coat but with different color)

large.jpg

Edited by Swashbuckler 1700

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

So someone posted this on Facebook yesterday... To me it looks primary source and from the period, but I could find no artist, reference, or date associated with it. Regardless it is a fabulous rendition of the breakdown of a Soldier's uniform (particularly a French uniform), CS Grant's book lists the Regiment De LA Couronne's colour's as being "Grey/White" (French Gris?) with Blue linings and turnbacks, but with white buttons (tin?), white breeches (maybe the same white/grey), and white lace on the hat.

Anyone know the source of this photo? Is it a primary resource?

gallery_3724_612_40649.jpg

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

So someone posted this on Facebook yesterday... To me it looks primary source and from the period, but I could find no artist, reference, or date associated with it. Regardless it is a fabulous rendition of the breakdown of a Soldier's uniform (particularly a French uniform), CS Grant's book lists the Regiment De LA Couronne's colour's as being "Grey/White" (French Gris?) with Blue linings and turnbacks, but with white buttons (tin?), white breeches (maybe the same white/grey), and white lace on the hat.

Anyone know the source of this photo? Is it a primary resource?

gallery_3724_612_40649.jpg

Here is a little about that picture

Made by Jacques-Antoine Delaistre (1690-1765) circa 1721

http://www.photo.rmn.fr/c/htm/CSearchZ.aspx?o=&Total=304&FP=51192502&E=2K1KTSJLISF91&SID=2K1KTSJLISF91&New=T&Pic=11&SubE=2C6NU0PI4DOX

Edited by Swashbuckler 1700

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

An example where there was soldiers aboard naval ship in pirate hunt:

http://historyreconsidered.net/Brittish_Military_Presence_in_America.html (I have noticed this before but now I have more to say)

Military Operations in the Caribbean and identifiable British units involved, 1660-1720

"1717 Cpt. Hume of the Scarborough sinks Martel’s ship at St Croix
Jones/Alexander’s Sea Service Foot (38th)"
General History of Pirates says:
In the Month of November, 1716, General Hamilton, Commander in chief of all the Leeward Carribee Islands, sent a Sloop Express to Captain Hume, at Barbadoes, Commander of his Majesty's Ship, Scarborough, of 30 Guns, and 140 Men, to acquaint him, that two Pyrate Sloops of 12 Guns each, molested the Colonies, having plun ered several Vessels. The Scarborough had bury'd twenty Men, and had near forty Sick, and therefore was but in ill State to go to Sea: However, Captain Hume left his sick Men behind, and sailed to the other Islands, for a supply of Men, taking 20 Soldiers from Antegoa; at Nevis, he took 10, and 10 at St. Christophers, and then sailed to the Island of Anguilla, where he learned, that some Time before, 2 such Sloops had been at Spanish-Town, otherwise called, one of the Virgin Islands: Accordingly, the next Day, the Scarborough came to Spanish-Town, but could hear no News of the Sloops, only, that they had been there about Christmas, (it being then the 15th of January.)
Later Hume attacked Martel's ship (Though accordingly to later edition than 1724 GHP it might have been some pirate named Kennedy (pirates anyway)
Interesting... What was Jones/Alexander’s Sea Service Foot (38th) in 1717?
Edited by Swashbuckler 1700

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

So I recently saw the below book come up on a miniature wargaming forum.... It is a pair of volumes (although Volume 2 is in 2 books, so it is 3 books) about Colonial Soldiers of Britain.

http://www.drenthpublishing.nl/colonialsoldiers/colonialsoldiers.html

I haven't had time to read them yet, but at a quick flip through, it is a treasure trove of information about structure, number of and rank of officers, enrollments lists (specially of officers), and other information about soldiers of the 1650-1714 period (although I saw many references in the book that dated as late as 1717). I have not yet found any good material culture information (colours of uniforms, materials, equipage etc.), but I am still very happy with this purchase. As far as I can tell, ordering straight from the publisher in the Netherlands is the only way to acquire these books (at the moment). But saying that, I ordered these about 2 weeks ago, and considering they shipped from the Netherlands, receiving these books in that short a span is pretty good timing.

One thing I did find on my initial browse of the books.... Is some solid information about marines in the North American colonies. I have previously been pretty strong in my opinion of the complete lack of evidence to British Marines being deployed to North America or the Caribbean during the War of Spanish Succession/Queen Anne's War period... And it looks like I was wrong. That said, it seems they only existed in very small numbers (as in a company here or there, attached to a regiment of Foote) and all accounts of Marines I have found so far, are in the northerly New England area, and in the areas of what is now Eastern Canada. The ONLY reference I have found to Marines in the Caribbean was mention of a company in Barbadoes in the King William's War period (1689-1697), and the author specifically states the Marines in this instance may just be sailors (as in sailors dressed as sailors) armed and given a designation of Marines. I will update if I find more information regarding marines.... But I think it is notable enough to mention that contrary to my former assertions, they did exist in small numbers in limited contexts.

Oh, and this does mean I will be resurrecting this project, and planning to make my second attempt at a Queen Anne's War soldier of an Independent Company of Foote over the coming months (most likely over this coming winter).

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

So, I am finally getting my start on remaking my Independent Company of Foote of the Queen Anne Era uniform...

And while I feel my past research has been fairly solid... I have done some further poking around.

I stumbled across the below entry from this link -> http://www.british-history.ac.uk/cal-treasury-books/vol25/pp316-331

If you scroll down to the second entry dated to June 21, you will find what I take to be the equipage order for an entire regiment. The regiment is attribute in the order to one Brigadier-General John Hill.... (a name I plan to investigate further, but a quick google search ties that name to the "Quebec Expedition" 1711). But there is some great information regarding to the amount, type of, and costs of the equipage for an army.

 

Not a full equipage list, but the below resupply list for cartouche boxes and other supplies for the company (of Foot) at Newfoundland dated to March 1700. Again scroll down to entry for March 13

http://www.british-history.ac.uk/cal-treasury-books/vol15/pp52-59

Also of great interest... a list of equipage for the Virginia colony, explicitly slated for the militia... Look for the first entry for Aug 20, dated to 1702. -> http://www.british-history.ac.uk/cal-treasury-books/vol17/pp16-31

Continueing to edit this post rather than post a million new entries... I found this item dated to 1720 (a little post Queen Anne's war, but still very much GAoP) scroll down to the first entry for Oct 16, reference to the use of Hammocks at Fort Nicholson (a wood stockade used in the Albany NY region during Queen Anne's war), and interesting enough, a specific mention as to "leather knapsacks" as I have often wondered when the transition from leather packs to canvas occured, and this shows that leather was still in use in 1720 America.

http://www.british-history.ac.uk/cal-state-papers/colonial/america-west-indies/vol32/pp165-187

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!


Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.


Sign In Now