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Found 7 results

  1. HMS London - sank 1665 - Artifacts

    Found the following on another forum I follow regarding the HMS London mentioned by William Brand back in March....... Posted by William Brand on 07 March 2014 - 12:11 PM in Captain Twill March 7 - On this day in 1665, the second rate 'HMS London' accidentally exploded in the Thames Estuary, killing 300 crewmen. Lots of more information in these links regarding the continuing conservation and recovery of artifacts from this time capsule of a British Man of War at the beginning of the GAOP. They even have SHOES! Hopefully much more to come. http://www.southendstandard.co.uk/news/echo/11223263.17th_century_Southend_shipwreck_to_give_up_its_secrets_with_new_English_Heritage_excavation/?ref=nt http://www.theguardian.com/science/2014/may/16/divers-emergency-thames-shipwreck-climate-change-london?CMP=twt_gu
  2. Just a note, HMS London that was mentioned in the 'this day in history thread' sank March 7, 1665. I posted information on it's artifacts being recovered over in the Shipyard section. One of the links shows a recovered shoe, for those of you with a shoe fixation. ;-)
  3. Top View

    From the album 1706 Admiralty Slop Contract Shoes by Sarah Juniper

    Note that the tonge is not absolutely huge like I've seen on some shoes and that the buckles are smaller ones that are the corret size and shape for the late seventeenth and early eighteenth centuries.
  4. Sole View

    From the album 1706 Admiralty Slop Contract Shoes by Sarah Juniper

    Bottom/sole view of the shoe. Notice that the shoes are straight lasted.
  5. Side View

    From the album 1706 Admiralty Slop Contract Shoes by Sarah Juniper

    The most interesting part of the uppers construction that I've seen is that the upper part of the shoe (the part that has the latchet for the buckle) isn't sown on top of the other leather like I've seen on other pairs of shoes like this, but actually are joined together at the same level and do not overlap at all.
  6. Heel View

    From the album 1706 Admiralty Slop Contract Shoes by Sarah Juniper

    The heel uses hard wood pegs. The shape of the pegs is based on archaeological shoes discovered on the La Belle shipwreck of 1685.
  7. Butt Stitch View

    From the album 1706 Admiralty Slop Contract Shoes by Sarah Juniper

    It was common practice for period shoes to utilize a round closing on the rear of the shoe (which many reenactors call "butt stich", which is actually a reenactorism). The stitch is that vertical line in the rear of the shoe.