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Found 3 results

  1. How to fly your colors?

    Having made my crew a larger flag for use at our events, I've come across a small dilemma. You see, the smaller flag was easily hung from a nearby tree branch or tent pole, but this larger flag (about 4'X6') is another matter. I've seen portable, telescoping flagpoles (for tailgates and the like), but the sturdy ones cost upwards of $300, which is more than I can spend. My current plan is to try three 5' sections of thick PVC or metal conduit (painted to look like wood, of course) connected by two 4-way joints. Rope will be run through the horizontal arms of the joints and staked down to the ground, creating a sort of rigging to stabilize the pole once it's in the ground. I was wondering if anyone could find any immediate fault with this plan, and wanted to see what all you creative folk have come up with for flying your colors.
  2. How to fly your colors?

    Having made my crew a larger flag for use at our events, I've come across a small dilemma. You see, the smaller flag was easily hung from a nearby tree branch or tent pole, but this larger flag (about 4'X6') is another matter. I've seen portable, telescoping flagpoles (for tailgates and the like), but the sturdy ones cost upwards of $300, which is more than I can spend. My current plan is to try three 5' sections of thick PVC or metal conduit (painted to look like wood, of course) connected by two 4-way joints. Rope will be run through the horizontal arms of the joints and staked down to the ground, creating a sort of rigging to stabilize the pole once it's in the ground. I was wondering if anyone could find any immediate fault with this plan, and wanted to see what all you creative folk have come up with for flying your colors.
  3. http://www.warhistoryonline.com/war-articles/ahoy-me-hearty-jolly-roger-flag-flown-atop-second-world-war-submarine-resurfaces-four-decades-after-it-went-missing.html?utm_source=rss&utm_medium=rss&utm_campaign=ahoy-me-hearty-jolly-roger-flag-flown-atop-second-world-war-submarine-resurfaces-four-decades-after-it-went-missing Gordon Brown, 66, of Gosport, Hants, found the flag, which belonged to the HMS Tantalus in his sister’s attic The flag had been given to his father Jack, a crew member on the submarine, but lost when he died 40 years ago A Jolly Roger flag flown atop a World War Two submarine has resurfaced – after going missing for 40 years. The flag was last flown on HMS Tantalus at the end of the war in 1945 and was given to the boat’s youngest submariner, telegraphist Jack Brown, at the end of its service. But the Jolly Roger went missing following Jack’s death four decades ago and has only just been found again by his delighted son Gordon in his sister’s attic. He now wants to see the flag flying again. Mr Brown, 66, from Gosport, Hampshire, said: ‘I was so pleased to have found it again, especially in such good condition. ‘I thought it had been lost but I’d been nagging my sister to look for it and thankfully it turned up in her attic. ‘Someone offered my £1,000 for it but I will never sell it. ‘I want to see it flying again as it would be the first time since 1945 and then I will give it to a museum perhaps.’ The history of HMS Tantalus is told by the symbols on the flag, with four bars representing the torpedoing of four ships and two daggers denoting the submarine’s two ‘cloak and dagger’ operations.