William Brand

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Everything posted by William Brand

  1. Utah Pirate Invasion

    The Golden Age of Piracy spanned a small rush of years between 1690 and 1730. During this period, notorious crews pillaged the world's seas and coastlines, taking what they wanted and leaving reputations of death and glory in their wakes. Join us as we celebrate these historic, ofttimes mythic seafarers over two days brimming with presentations, trials, music, contests and immersive pirate history. Come for a day or camp for the weekend (August 4th through the 5th) at Fort Buenaventura. Learn why so many share a love for the mystery and romance of the Golden Age. https://www.facebook.com/events/312939285864135/
  2. Sea of Thieves

    How is it?
  3. The Phone-a-Pirate Program

    Revived after nearly 8 years. Niiiice.
  4. The Phone-a-Pirate Program

    We should start something really fun and bizarre called the Phone-a-Pirate Program, where we randomly pass out our phone numbers to pirates that we have always wanted to talk to and call them. Here are the rules. Give out your phone number. Get or make a call to a pirate you have never spoken with. Carry on a conversation no less than one minute and no more than three. Tell us all about it. Yes, as I told Dorian earlier this evening in chat, I have eaten the lion's share of cheap, oreo cookie knockoffs and I haven't had enough sleep. I shouldn't even be allowed on here in this condition.
  5. Welcome aboard!

    Welcome aboard, Master Vincentio.
  6. Welcome aboard!

    Welcome to the Pyracy Pub. This is the definitive pirate community for discussions and topics covering reenactment crews, history, ships, food, drink, music, events, writing, craftsmanship, costuming, trade goods, and miscellaneous odds and ends outside the hobby. If you have an interest in pirates on one or all subjects, this is your one stop shop for life before the mast. We come from all walks of life and each of us has a different reason for loving the pirate trade, so don't be afraid to explain what brings you here. Introduce yourself and ask as many questions as you want. We pride ourselves on knowing a thing or two about pirates, and if we don't have an answer, we love a good discussion and the hunt for proverbial buried treasures. You can introduce yourself here or in a new thread. It's traditional to offer a symbolic drink and a little information about yourself. If you belong to a specific crew, please let us know where you all stem from and how others can join your group. For example... My name is William Pace. I live and work as a graphic designer and photographer out of Logan, Utah. Yes, I'm a thousand miles from the sea. Yes, I recognize the contradiction of my hobby versus my location in the high desert. Yes, it doesn't matter, because I love maritime history. I've been on the 'Pub' since June of 2004. I attend only a handful of events across the U.S., but I consider myself lucky to know my share of pirates on and off of pyracy.com. Some of my closest, life long friends come from here.
  7. Tsunami Kate

    Today's special is...
  8. Tsunami Kate

    I finally became a Cap'n on this 'ere island of Pyracy, so I spent the night in celebratin' ashore with wine, women and song. I drank 'til I couldn't stand and then I drank sittin'. Then I drank lying down. I don't remember what I did after that. Strange. Still... ...imagine me surprise when I awoke the next day to find the deed to a frigate clutched in me fingers! I unrolled the paper to read and re-read the name. It seems that I was new owner of a Spanish frigate which had been oddly named "Katherine the Great". A Spanish ship named for Russian royalty? I wondered how had I even come to own such a vessel. I found upon inquiry, that I had won her in a game of chance sometime during the night, though it was hard to consider it a win when I finally located her berth. She lay in the trees, a full 200 feet from the tide line. She was upright but listing 5 degrees to larboard with her starboard side facing out to sea and her stern almost due west. Her sails had been stripped for other ships long before my arrival and more than a little timber had been taken as well. She had little riggin' left and her color showed that she had endured at least one season of neglect since that fateful wave had brought her hard ashore. I was stunned. I stood transfixed, both in horror and delight. Here was a ship of excellent make too far from the sea to ever know it again. Here was a vessel of strong timbers that had most unexpectedly arrived in a grove of pecan trees and date palms. Here was a most sad and glorious site mixed together. At first, I did not know what to do. Then, I clambered aboard to survey her depths. Little or no furnishings remained except those built into her original design. Only a few doors were missing and she seemed deceptively new in places, but poorly neglected just the same. The galley remained much as it had been, with some evidence of fire remaining from her inland journey. I numbered the two stoves appreciably and noted the well made cupboards and larder. One could feed a fair number with such a kitchen, but what of that? I reminded meself that she were landlocked and should remain so without an undertaking that I meself could never afford. My remaining rummaging revealed more of the same. A good ship that might never sail again. I stood at the wheel for the better part of an hour. I then took to pacing her length for another hour and a half. When the sun was near it's zenith it occurred to me that she might be put to good use. She might be home to a crew of a sort. She might know the devotions of many a sailor again. She might be home to those of us that find ourselves landlocked and in need of the sea... ...so I went to work. Today I open the doors to me first piratical establishment. I've sewn up her wounds and staved off her decay and neglect. Sixteen barrels of good oil and not a few casks of nails, wooden pegs and iron pins have put her right again. I've polished brass, glass and beam. I've scraped, reshaped and verily resurrected what would have been lost if not for drunken chance. She be landlocked surely, but she be a fine ship nonetheless, and until I can drag her back to sea, I shall fill this unfortunate interval in her life with music, mirth and merry-makin'! So come aboard and enjoy a pint. Sit down a spell and spin some smoke rings and yarns. To name this new establishment, I have borrowed on her life from before and the circumstances that brought her here... ...I call her Tsunami Kate. To slake and satiate all who enter in.
  9. Tsunami Kate

  10. First Time Traveling to Key West

    You must go to 'Blue Heaven' for breakfast. Fantastic breakfast fare. You must also go to Cafe Sole for dinner. Ask for 'the perfect dinner'. It's not on the menu, but you won't regret it.
  11. Welcome aboard!

    And tell us where you're from and who you crew with.
  12. 18th Century Puddings

    Here are some excellent notes on 18th century puddings... https://savoringthepast.net/2013/10/03/please-bring-back-the-puddings/ http://www.townsends.us/blog/tag/boiled-pudding/
  13. Woodes Rogers Correspondence

    Google books has the same link and I can't find an epublication anywhere else. Google books has 'A Cruising Voyage Around the World', but that's all I have... https://books.google.com/books?id=J1xCAAAAcAAJ&printsec=frontcover&dq=woodes+rogers&hl=en&sa=X&ved=0ahUKEwir04XTwunZAhXiq1QKHYgxAnwQ6AEIKTAA#v=onepage&q=woodes rogers&f=false
  14. Upcoming Acts of Pyracy

    I'm starting an all purpose thread about upcoming, current and recently attended events to help our members find events that are going on all around the world. If you see an ad for an event anywhere, just drop a link here and we'll discuss the details! For example, the Sheppey Pirates are holding an event the first week of August with an open air cinema, water fight and live music. Sea Dog Night and Gypsey Carnival is July 14th - 18th in Lebanon, Oregon. The Battleship New Jersey Pirate Invasion is on July 9th.
  15. The Pyracy Pub is Closing!

    Ahoy, all pirates everywhere! With a heart both proud of our legacy and heavy at our loss, I must announce that Pyracy.com is closing the doors of the 'Pub' at the start of the new year. The Pub (as it exists now in website form) no longer draws in the pirate hoards it once did, and so we will be moving the Pub to more 'social' seas and we ask that anyone wishing to save photos, stories, discussions and any other thing contained on the website, please do so before the end of the year. Then we will commit the website to the deep.
  16. How to sew a Ditty-bag

    So many people have mentioned you of late that I'm sending out a shout.
  17. The Pyracy Pub is Closing!

    I believe your story remains the most visited thread on the Pub, so thanks for the longevity of the project.
  18. Pirate Flag (a making of)

    My wife Tracy hand sewed our flag using linen thread and linen cross bones on a wool bunting. It's an amazing flag and she worked tirelessly to make it happen.
  19. The Pyracy Pub is Closing!

    Aye, Silver. Just how shall we send her off...? Perhaps one last posting event here on the Pub. We invite everyone and all and we share all our favorite experiences and raise a glass! I'll mull it over and we'll pick a day in January.
  20. The Dutch East India Company and other companies of the wide world have used emblems on official documents or to mark property, but which logs were used and when? I'm finding conflicting information regrading the economical powerhouses and what logos, insignias and emblems were used and during which years they were employed. I'm also curious about the emblem used throughout PoTC 2 and its authenticity. Any company emblem information would be appreciated, as we may be using them at PIP to mark 'acquired' goods and sundries. This would also include woodcuts, engravings and all matter of art found on letters of marque and other offical papers.
  21. Pyracy Pub Wares

    A collectible, embroidered patch is now being offered with a two fold purpose. First, because patches are cool and should be available to anyone that has loved the Pub and would have something to celebrate it all the time, and second, the funds will be used to maintain the Pub as a forum and archive. These will be 4.25" x 2.75" with iron-on backing and a merrowed border. Suitable for jackets, hats, duffle bags, backpacks, and about anything else one might put patches to. Please help support a run (and perhaps an overrun for future funding) by listing how many you'd like. The patches will be $10 for 1 or 3 for $25. Prices include domestic shipping in the U.S. (please add five dollars outside the U.S.). Once we have enough to cover an order, I'll call upon the funds, have them made and ship them right out to everyone supporting the run. INTEREST: Name, quantity
  22. On this day in history...

    September 18 - On this day in 1687, the Irish made a Declaration promising a pardon to pirates who surrender themselves to Sir Robert Holmes.
  23. On this day in history...

    NOVEMBER 21, 1724 On this day in 1724, the pirate ship 'Revenge' attacked the British ship 'Sarah'. Most of the crew was set adrift, though some deemed useful were given the option of joining John Gow's crew. Over the next few months, John Gow attacked several other ships. Also on this day in 1996, Intersal Inc., a private research firm, discovered the wreck believed to be the 'Queen Anne’s Revenge'. It was located by Intersal's director of operations, Mike Daniel, who used historical research provided by Intersal's president, Phil Masters and archaeologist David Moore. The vessel is in the Atlantic Ocean in shallow water offshore from Fort Macon State Park (34°41′44″N 76°41′20″W), Atlantic BEach, North Carolina. Several of the cannons and more than 16,000 artifacts have been recovered.
  24. On this day in history...

    August 1 - On this day in 1700, Culliford was arrested, and taken to the Marshalsea prison. He was tried for piracy of the Great Mohammed in 1698 and his pardon was ruled invalid. He was saved from hanging, because he was needed in Samuel Burgess' trial. Following the trial, Culliford disappeared from record, and rumor has it that he next served on a naval ship after which he disappears from the records like another famous pirate Henry Every. Also on this day in 1708, Woodes Rogers’ expedition to capture a Manila galleon departed from Britain. And on this day in 1721, Bartholomew Roberts captured two large ships at Point Cestos, now River Cess in Liberia. One of these was the frigate Onslow, transporting soldiers bound for Cape Coast (Cabo Corso) Castle. A number of the soldiers wished to join the pirates and were eventually accepted, but as landlubbers were given only a quarter share. The Onslow was converted to become the fourth Royal Fortune. And also on this day in 1722, George Shelvocke returned from his round-the-world, privateering adventure.
  25. On this day in history...

    July 19 - On this day in 1545, the Tudor warship, Mary Rose, sunk in Portsmouth Harbor at Hampshire, England. Also on this day in 1702, Philemon Ewer, the English shipbuilder is born. He is responsible for the rebuild of the first ship built in North America back in 1696. He also built the HMS Salisbury, which served as the location for the famous experiments on scurvy in 1747, by James Lind. And on this day in 1723, Charles Harris and 25 pirates were hanged in Newport, Rhode Island. Joseph Libbey, who was abducted the previous year along with Philip Ashton, was among them. All were all former members of Edward Low’s crew.